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40 Fascinating Lectures for Linguistics Geeks

40 Fascinating Lectures for Linguistics Geeks
Grey Matters: Understanding Language: Presented by University of California at San Diego’s Dr. Jeffrey Elman, this hour-long talk delves deeply into the cognitive components behind language and language acquisition. Specifically, why humans are the only animals capable of speech.Jesse Sheidlower: The F-Word: The editor-at-large of the Oxford English Dictionary itself offers up a humorous and thoroughly provocative look at one of the most inflammatory words the language possesses. His amazing insight and expertise shed light on the alchemy of offense and how one mere syllable can still pack a megaton punch.Murray Gell-Mann on the ancestor of language: Although this Nobel Prize winner is better known for his physics and discovery of quarks, he still enjoys exploring other topics, and used some TED time to share his linguistics research.

http://www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2011/05/40-fascinating-lectures-for-linguistics-geeks/

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Aliens DO Exist, Says Top Secret FBI Memo Found By UFO Researchers Aliens do exist, according to a top secret FBI memo found by researchers into UFOs. Investigators at the Hakui Centre for UFO Research in Tokyo, Japan, claim they have discovered a document that proves there is extra-terrestrial life. The FBI memo contains details about flying saucers being piloted by three feet tall aliens. The Bureau is said to be concerned about the findings at the research centre, fearing the discovery could lead to members of the public gaining access to thousands of documents. The FBI memo reportedly reads: “An investigator for the Air Force states that three so-called flying saucers had been recovered in New Mexico.

Water Animal Guide Quick find... Filter By: type diet region continent all CLIL4teachers / FrontPage PLEASE NOTE: You can download resources from the wiki without requesting access. Please request access (see link on the right) if you would like to leave comments or upload your own materials. To be given access, you need to include a short message to explain your interest in CLIL. Thank you. Welcome to the website for teachers interested in Content and Language Integrated Learning ​Mysterious 'X-Files' noises captured 22 miles above Earth's surface — RT News Published time: May 05, 2015 15:10 Reuters/Terry Virts/NASA For the first time in 50 years, mysterious 'X-Files' sounds have been recorded from the edge of space.

20 New Lines from The Epic of Gilgamesh Discovered in Iraq, Adding New Details to the Story The Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the oldest narratives in the world, got a surprise update last month when the Sulaymaniyah Museum in the Kurdistan region of Iraq announced that it had discovered 20 new lines of the Babylonian-Era poem of gods, mortals, and monsters. Since the poem has existed in fragments since the 18th century BC, there has always been the possibility that more would turn up. And yet the version we’re familiar with — the one discovered in 1853 in Nineveh — hasn’t changed very much over recent decades. The text remained fairly fixed — that is, until the fall of Baghdad in 2003 and the intense looting that followed yielded something new. Since that time, the History Blog notes: the [Sulaymaniyah] museum has a matter of policy paid smugglers to keep artifacts from leaving the country, no questions asked.

Foreign Subtitles Improve Speech Perception Do you speak English as a second language well, but still have trouble understanding movies with unfamiliar accents, such as Brad Pitt's southern accent in Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds? In a new study, published in the open-access journal PLoS One, Holger Mitterer (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics) and James McQueen (MPI and Radboud University Nijmegen) show how you can improve your second-language listening ability by watching the movie with subtitles -- as long as these subtitles are in the same language as the film. Subtitles in one's native language, the default in some European countries, may actually be counter-productive to learning to understand foreign speech. Mitterer and McQueen show that listeners can tune in to an unfamiliar regional accent in a foreign language.

Songshan-A Conservation Window in China By Margaret Southern With millions of visitors pouring into China for the 2008 Olympic Games, a nature reserve just 55 miles from Beijing presented an opportunity for tourists to experience the region’s spectacular biodiversity up close. Nestled in the depths of the Yangshan Mountains, 11,500-acre Songshan National Nature Reserve is home to hundreds of plant and animal species, including four nationally protected animals: the golden eagle, imperial eagle, golden leopard and black stork. But the reserve lacks the necessary facilities to accommodate increased ecotourism and does not have the resources to help limit unregulated public access, which has already damaged sensitive areas in the reserve. That’s why the Chinese government has asked The Nature Conservancy to help transform Songshan — and 50 other nature reserves across the country — into a world-class nature reserves that safeguard their rich habitat and promote sustainable ecotourism. Ecotourism Can Be Sustainable

Maurya Empire The Maurya Empire was a geographically extensive Iron Age historical power in ancient India, ruled by the Maurya dynasty from 322–185 BCE. Originating from the kingdom of Magadha in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (modern Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh) in the eastern side of the Indian subcontinent, the empire had its capital city at Pataliputra (modern Patna).[1][2] The Empire was founded in 322 BCE by Chandragupta Maurya, who had overthrown the Nanda Dynasty and rapidly expanded his power westwards across central and western India, taking advantage of the disruptions of local powers in the wake of the withdrawal westward by Alexander's Hellenic armies. By 316 BCE the empire had fully occupied Northwestern India, defeating and conquering the satraps left by Alexander.[3] Chandragupta then defeated the invasion led by Seleucus I, a Macedonian general from Alexander's army, gaining additional territory west of the Indus River.[4] History[edit] Chandragupta Maurya and Chanakya[edit] Bindusara[edit]

Amondawa tribe lacks abstract idea of time, study says 20 May 2011Last updated at 02:04 By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News The Amondawa were first "discovered" by anthropologists in 1986 An Amazonian tribe has no abstract concept of time, say researchers. The Amondawa lacks the linguistic structures that relate time and space - as in our idea of, for example, "working through the night". The study, in Language and Cognition, shows that while the Amondawa recognise events occuring in time, it does not exist as a separate concept. The idea is a controversial one, and further study will bear out if it is also true among other Amazon languages.

Medieval Towns of ROMANIA - Transylvania - Official Travel and Tourism Information Central Romania encompasses what is popularly known as Transylvania – a place that immediately brings to mind the legend of Count Dracula. While the legend is certainly intriguing and a genuine tourist attraction, the region has much more to offer. Some of Europe’s best-preserved medieval towns, most notably Sighisoara, Brasov and Sibiu, are located here. Visitors can marvel at Transylvania’s unique architectural treasures, such as castles, fortified churches and centuries-old houses, while exploring sites where more than 900 years ago Saxon craftsmen and merchants established powerful and rich citadels. During the middle of the 12th century Saxons came to the area from the Luxembourg, Lorraine, Moselle, Rhine and Wallonia regions of northwestern Europe.

Vedic period The Vedic period (or Vedic age) was a period in history during which the Vedas, the oldest scriptures of Hinduism, were composed. The time span of the period is uncertain. Philological and linguistic evidence indicates that the Rigveda, the oldest of the Vedas, was composed roughly between 1700 and 1100 BCE, also referred to as the early Vedic period.[1] The end of the period is commonly estimated to have occurred about 500 BCE, and 150 BCE has been suggested as a terminus ante quem for all Vedic Sanskrit literature. Transmission of texts in the Vedic period was by oral tradition alone,[3] and a literary tradition set in only in post-Vedic times. Despite the difficulties in dating the period, the Vedas can safely be assumed to be several thousands of years old.

Year 7 using The Hobbit article to describe people By Britta Sue’s Yr 7 have been writing using The Hobbit article and thoroughly enjoying it too! The article is all about physical description, introducing body features and matching adjectives. There is a reading text and a gap fill activity where students complete model sentences of how to describe a person. They then answer questions on the reading material before building sentences with their personal information (download the article below the cut). Sue’s Yr 7 students have worked through the activities and then engaged in an extended writing activity.

University and Historic Precinct of Alcalá de Henares University and Historic Precinct of Alcalá de Henares Founded by Cardinal Jiménez de Cisneros in the early 16th century, Alcalá de Henares was the world's first planned university city. It was the original model for the Civitas Dei (City of God), the ideal urban community which Spanish missionaries brought to the Americas. It also served as a model for universities in Europe and elsewhere.

Indus Valley Civilization The major sites of the Indus Valley Civilization imposed over modern borders The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) was a Bronze Age civilization (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) extending from what today is northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and northwest India (see map). Along with Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, it was one of three early civilizations of the Old World, and the most widespread among them, covering an area of 1.25 million km2.[3] It flourished in the basins of the Indus River, one of the major rivers of Asia, and the now dried up Sarasvati River,[4][5] which once coursed through northwest India and eastern Pakistan together with its tributaries flowed along a channel, presently identified as that of the Ghaggar-Hakra River on the basis of various scientific studies.[7][8][9]

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