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Federation of American Scientists

Federation of American Scientists

https://fas.org/

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Earthquake prediction Earthquake prediction is a branch of the science of seismology concerned with the specification of the time, location, and magnitude of future earthquakes within stated confidence limits but with sufficient precision that a warning can be issued.[1][2] Of particular importance is the prediction of hazardous earthquakes likely to cause loss of life or damage to infrastructure. Earthquake prediction is sometimes distinguished from earthquake forecasting, which can be defined as the probabilistic assessment of general earthquake hazard, including the frequency and magnitude of damaging earthquakes in a given area over years or decades.[3] It can be further distinguished from earthquake warning systems, which upon detection of an earthquake, provide a real-time warning to regions that might be affected. Earthquake prediction and significance[edit] Prediction methods[edit]

School of Mathematics and Physics Pictures above: (1) Longtime custodian of the famous experiment, the late Professor John Mainstone. (2) Three webcams trained on the experiment 24/7. (3) The Pitch Drop Experiment. (4) Close up of the pitch drop. About the Pitch Drop Experiment While the School of Mathematics and Physics at The University of Queensland has an international reputation for cutting-edge research and innovative teaching in the disciplines of Mathematics, Physics and Statistics, it is also home to the famous Pitch Drop Experiment. Improbable Research - Longest Running Experiments by Marc Abrahams We are happy to report that three of the world’s longest-running scientific experiments are indeed still running. It has been a number of years since anyone checked on all three. With assistance from scientists in several nations, we have managed to do so. Background on these Experiments

Milgram's Obedience Experiments By Kendra Cherry Updated December 16, 2015. If a person in a position of authority ordered you to deliver a 400-volt electrical shock to another person, would you follow orders? Most people would answer this question with an adamant no, but Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a series of obedience experiments during the 1960s that led to some surprising results. These experiments offer a compelling and disturbing look at the power of authority and obedience. More recent investigations cast doubt on some of the implications of Milgram's findings and even question the results and procedures themselves.

Nanotubes and Buckyballs Home > Introduction > Nanotubes and Buckyballs Last Updated: Tuesday, 29-May-2012 06:53:42 PDT Go directly to Websites Nanotube: "Conceptually, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be considered to be formed by the rolling of a single layer of graphite (called a graphene layer) into a seamless cylinder. A multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can similarly be considered to be a coaxial assembly of cylinders of SWCNTs, like a Russian doll, one within another; the separation between tubes is about equal to that between the layers in natural graphite.

Pacific Sea Level Monitoring Project The Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM), operates under the Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac). It is a continuation of the 20-year South Pacific Sea Level and Climate Monitoring Project (SPSLCMP) The 14 Pacific Island countries participating in the project are the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. The primary goal of the project is to generate an accurate record of variance in long-term sea level for the Pacific region. The project also provides information about the processes, scale and implications of sea-level rise and variability of extreme events on South Pacific communities. It also makes sea-level data more readily available and usable to support management of coastal infrastructure and industries.

SOLAR IMPULSE - Solar Impulse 2 Whereas the prototype uses existing technologies, Solar Impulse HB-SIB requires the development of new materials and new construction methods. Solvay has invented electrolytes that allow the energy density of the batteries to be increased; Bayer MaterialScience is allowing the project to make use of its nanotechnologies; and Décision is using carbon fibers that are lighter in weight than any previously seen. The first wing spar section was delivered to Dübendorf in March 2012. However, during the final test of this central part, the structure of the wing spar succumbed to the load and broke. The initial shock soon turned out to be an opportunity: the flight around the world had to be postponed which opened the door for going to the United States and completing the epic journey across America.

Great Lakes Science Center Great Lakes Science Center is funded by the citizens of Cuyahoga County through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture, grants, funds, and corporate and individual gifts. The museum opened in July 1996. The center's exhibits support STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) with exhibits including the BioMedTech Gallery, advanced energy, science phenomena and space. UCL Hazard Centre Collecting Lava Samples on Kilauea, Hawaii Pyroclastic Flow at Montserrat Novarupta Dome, Katmai National Park, Alaska Communities at risk from coastal flooding and storm surge, Albay Province Deadly Shadow of Vesuvius by Peter Tyson In a word, yes. But that assertion, like saying we can predict the weather, bears significant caveats. Volcanologists can predict eruptions—if they have a thorough understanding of a volcano's eruptive history, if they can install the proper instrumentation on a volcano well in advance of an eruption, and if they can continuously monitor and adequately interpret data coming from that equipment. But even then, like their counterparts in meteorology, volcanologists can only offer probabilities that an event will occur; they can never be sure how severe a predicted eruption will be or, for that matter, whether it will even break the surface.

Projects: Self-Powered Camera We have designed a simple pixel circuit, where the pixel’s photodiode can be used to not only measure the incident light level, but also to convert the incident light into electrical energy. A sensor architecture is developed where, during each image capture cycle, the pixels are used first to record and read out the image and then used to harvest energy and charge the sensor’s power supply. We have conducted several experiments using off-the-shelf discrete components to validate the practical feasibility of our approach. We first developed a single pixel based on our design and used it to physically scan images of scenes. Next, we developed a fully self-powered camera that produces 30x40 images.

SCIENCE SHOWOFF curated by Prof Sophie Scott. March 17th, Star of Kings. TICKET LINK: Don’t worry. We’d never do a zombie-themed gig. ZOMBIES ARE SO OVER. But we still love the brain, and that’s why we’ve teamed up with long-term Showoff Science Advisor Prof Sophie Scott to pull together a whole night of chaotic science cabaret around the theme of the brain.

Science and Technology of WWII Science, Technology, and Warfare through the Ages On the face of it, few human activities would seem to be more different than war and science. War aims to kill people and destroy things, to bring one country’s military (or their whole society) under the control of another.

The Future of Leap Seconds Leap seconds are added to our clocks to compensate for the Earth's slowing rotation. However, some scientists propose abolishing leap seconds in the future, redefining the way we measure time. This issue will be put to a vote in 2015. Should Earth's Rotation Define Time?

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