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Do You Really Want to Live Forever?

Do You Really Want to Live Forever?
Imagine you are offered a trustworthy opportunity for immortality in which your mind (perhaps also your body) will persist eternally. Let’s further stipulate that the offer includes perpetual youthful health and the ability to upgrade to any cognitive and physical technologies that become available in the future. There is one more stipulation: You could never decide later to die. Would you take it? Metaphysician and former British diplomat Stephen Cave thinks accepting such an offer would be a bad idea. Cave’s fascinating new book, Immortality, posits that civilization is a major side effect of humanity's attempts to live forever. Cave identifies four immortality narratives that drive civilizations over time which he calls; (1) Staying Alive, (2) Resurrection, (3) Soul, and (4) Legacy. Why not simply repair the damage caused by aging, thus defeating physical death? Resurrection is his next immortality narrative. The Transformation problem is harder. Counterfeit?

http://reason.com/archives/2012/05/29/do-you-want-to-live-forever

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