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10 Book Series So Addictive, You Never Want Them to End

10 Book Series So Addictive, You Never Want Them to End
I've said this before on io9, but Julian May released a series of books years ago which I found extremely addicting. The Saga of Pliocene Exile, and The Galactic Milieu Series, which combines for 9 books of (as a recent meme says...) "More Awesome Than A Monkey In A Bacon Tuxedo Riding A Cyborg Unicorn With A Lightsaber For The Horn On The Tip Of A Space Shuttle Closing In On Mars, While Engulfed In Flames." I recently ruffled some feathers when I made a comment about female fantasy and science fiction authors not being my favorite authors, in general. I was hoping people understood that it really was meant in general, and not the rule, for me. Julian May, in my opinion, is one of the best authors on the planet.

http://io9.com/5972411/10-book-series-so-addictive-you-never-want-them-to-end

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7 Books That Will Change How You See The World If you’re a human and you have a brain, then you probably like using your brain. And if you like using your brain, then you love having those epiphany moments where your hair blows back and you go “Whoa” like Keanu Reeves in The Matrix when he learns Kung Fu from a USB drive in his neck. I know it’s not what the cool kids like to do, but I like to read non-fiction.

My Ideal Bookshelf: Famous Artists and Writers Select Their All-Time Favorite Books by Maria Popova Reverse-engineering identity through the love of books. In 2007, artist and illustrator Jane Mount began painting “portraits of people through the spines of their books” — those aspirational bookshelves we all hold in our heads (and, ideally, on our walls), full of all the books that helped us discover and rediscover who we are, what we stand for, and what we’d like to become. A kind of book spine poetry of identity. In 2010, she paired with Paris Review writer Thessaly La Force and the two asked more than a hundred of today’s most exciting creators — writers, artists, designers, critics, filmmakers, chefs, architects — what those favorite, timeless books were for them.

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth.

Elementary Particles A text summary of this presentation is shown below for easy reference Particles electron neutrino νe What Ockham really said In the arsenal of eternal skeptics there are few tools more dramatically and more commonly used than Ockham’s razor. It is triumphantly applied to resolve arguments about ghosts (more parsimoniously seen as misperceptions by distraught family members or the suggestible), UFOs (evidently hoaxes and mistaken observations of natural phenomena) and telepathy (a “delusion” of wishful thinking and poorly-constructed tests). Born in England, Franciscan monk William of Ockham (c. 1287–1347) is among the most prominent figures in the history of philosophy during the High Middle Ages. The Skeptics Dictionary quotes the Razor as Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate, or “plurality should not be posited without necessity," while Wikipedia defines Ockham's razor as follows: “Among competing hypotheses, the one that makes the fewest assumptions should be selected.”

johnnylists 1. How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff – A mind opening look at how statistics can be manipulated to dazzle and deceive you. 2. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks – Take a look at neurological diseases and how one man could mistake his wife for a hat and not even realize it. 3. A year of reading the world In 2012, the world came to London for the Olympics and I went out to meet it. I read my way around all the globe’s 196 independent countries – plus one extra territory chosen by blog visitors – sampling one book from every nation. I read a story from Swaziland, a novel from Nicaragua, a book from Brunei, a… well, you get the picture. It wasn’t easy — according to the Society of Authors, only 3 per cent of the books published in the UK each year are translations.

Phobos Entertainment's "100 Science Fiction Books You Just Have to Read" on Lists of Bests Take my word for it; all science fiction books are not created equal. All right, don’t take my word for it. You’ll figure it out when you plow through packed bookstore shelves. You’ll realize soon enough that not every writer pens a tale worth reading. So just how does one find stellar SF? Enlightenment: Is Science Ready to Take it Seriously? by Jeff WarrenPsychology Tomorrow Magazine I’m not given to making grand predictions, but in this case I can’t resist: the very real spiritual transformation at the heart of mysticism is about to explode into the secular mainstream, and the consequences may just revolutionize our scientific understanding of the mind. Yowzer! No doubt the reader’s New Age flapdoodle-detector is now shrieking.

Culture - Reading the world in 196 books I used to think of myself as a fairly cosmopolitan sort of person, but my bookshelves told a different story. Apart from a few Indian novels and the odd Australian and South African book, my literature collection consisted of British and American titles. Worse still, I hardly ever tackled anything in translation. My reading was confined to stories by English-speaking authors. So, at the start of 2012, I set myself the challenge of trying to read a book from every country (well, all 195 UN-recognised states plus former UN member Taiwan) in a year to find out what I was missing. With no idea how to go about this beyond a sneaking suspicion that I was unlikely to find publications from nearly 200 nations on the shelves of my local bookshop, I decided to ask the planet’s readers for help.

Top 100 Fiction A contemporary list, with an international flavour and a respect for the classics, The Best Books: Top 100 Novels of All Time list contains many of the great works of fiction you'd expect, but with a few surprises to add a little spice to the collection. Which books would you omit and which would you add to our list? Please let us know in the comments section below. 1. MOSS Robot Construction System I missed your Kickstarter and/or Pre-orders, can I still order a kit now? Sorry, not right now! Please see the answer for "How can I order MOSS?" below. How can I order MOSS? MOSS will be available for purchase very soon.

Clay Shirky Fifteen years ago, a research group called The Fraunhofer Institute announced a new digital format for compressing movie files. This wasn’t a terribly momentous invention, but it did have one interesting side effect: Fraunhofer also had to figure out how to compress the soundtrack. The result was the Motion Picture Experts Group Format 1, Audio Layer III , a format you know and love, though only by its acronym, MP3. The Red and the Black Le Rouge et le Noir (French pronunciation: ​[lə ʁuʒ e lə nwaʁ]; French for The Red and the Black) is a historical psychological novel in two volumes by Stendhal, published in 1830.[1] It chronicles the attempts of a provincial young man to rise socially beyond his modest upbringing through a combination of talent, hard work, deception, and hypocrisy—yet who ultimately allows his passions to betray him. The novel’s full title, Le Rouge et le Noir: Chronique du XIXe siècle (The Red and the Black: A Chronicle of the 19th Century),[2] indicates its two-fold literary purpose as both a psychological portrait of the romantic protagonist, Julien Sorel, and an analytic, sociological satire of the French social order under the Bourbon Restoration (1814–30). In English, Le Rouge et le Noir is variously translated as Red and Black, Scarlet and Black, and The Red and the Black, without the sub-title.[3] §Background[edit] §Plot[edit]

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