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John Cartan - 20 Strange and Wonderful Books

John Cartan - 20 Strange and Wonderful Books
20. The Tolkien Reader by J. R. The works of J.R.R. As I grow older, it's his short stories I particularly value. Tolkien wrote this story to demonstrate his belief that fairy tales are for adults. Related:  horror / dystopiabook lists

Infographic of the Day: How Segregated is Your City? Recently, cartographer Bill Rankin produced an astounding map of Chicago, which managed to show the city's areas of racial integration. Eric Fischer saw those maps, and took it upon himself to create similar ones for the top 40 cities in the United States. Fisher used a straight forward method borrowed from Rankin: Using U.S. Census data from 2000, he created a map where one dot equals 25 people. The dots are then color-coded based on race: White is pink; Black is blue; Hispanic is orange, and Asian is green. The results for various cities are fascinating: Just like every city is different, every city is integrated (or segregated) in different ways. Washington, D.C., for example, has a stark east/west divide between white and black: Detroit, meanwhile, is marked by the infamous Eight Mile beltway, which serves a precise boundary for the city's black and white populations. However, other cities present better pictures of racial integration. L.A., meanwhile, is sort of the opposite.

The 10 Most Disturbing Books Of All Time In my younger days if I heard a book or movie was disturbing or hard to handle I generally took that as a challenge. Most books generally turned out to not be too bad, but occasionally I’d come across something that would leave me with a sick feeling in my stomach for weeks. I’ve largely outgrown this “genre” of late, but here are my picks for the ten most disturbing books of all time. Any one of these books is capable of leaving you feeling a little depressed at the least, and permanently scarred at the worst. I’d say enjoy, but that doesn’t really seem appropriate … 10. Blindness is a book with a truly horrifying scenario at it’s heart: what if everyone in the world were to lose their sight to disease in a short period of time? 9. Anti drug crusaders should stop airing goofy commercials that nobody takes seriously and start pushing to have Requiem For A Dream made required reading for every high schooler in the country. 8. Naked Lunc is another ode to drug addiction. 7. 6. Bleak. 5.

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years In compiling the books on this list, the editors at SuperScholar have tried to provide a window into the culture of the last 50 years. Ideally, if you read every book on this list, you will know how we got to where we are today. Not all the books on this list are “great.” The criterion for inclusion was not greatness but INFLUENCE. All the books on this list have been enormously influential. The books we chose required some hard choices. We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45.

74 Books to Read if You Love the Hunger Games If you haven't read the Hunger Games you really should! They're pretty awesome. Check them out: If you're already a fan of the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins... You should add these books to your to be read pile! (The recommendations are in no particular order.) Matched Trilogy by Ally Condie In a world where Officials pick your perfect mate, what happens when you’ve two choices? Maze Runner Trilogy by James Dashner A boy wakes up in a Glade with other boys knowing only his name, not how he got there, or how to escape the enclosed walls. Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry A young boy is given the job to retain the Community’s memories and to advise them using that knowledge, but he doesn’t like what he sees when he knows the past. Books of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau A city of light amidst the darkness begins to go black and survival means finding a way out by going through the unknown. Uglies Quartet by Scott Westerfeld Selection Trilogy by Kiera Cass UPDATE: Novellas added to series: The Prince , The Guard

Strangest Books Ever Written Lofoten – Arctic Circle Anomaly The archipelago of Lofoten in Norway is north of the Arctic Circle. Yet throughout the year it has temperatures which belie its position. This is because of the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. It makes Lofoten an unexpected delight – its early settlers must have thought they had stumbled across an arctic paradise. Prepare to have your breath taken away. What they found there was a sea teeming with life and the largest deep water coral reef in the word. The settlers gave one of the islands (now known as Vestvågøya) the name Lofoten which is Norse for the foot of the lynx. The first settlers must have arrived here centuries before but the archipelago, because of its climate, has been the center of huge cod fisheries for over a millennia. People were drawn to the area mostly because of the sea life. As time went on Lofoten became the name for the whole chain of islands. The place is so far north that here you can experience the midnight sun.

Books that will induce a mindfuck Here is the list of books that will officially induce mindfucks, sorted alphabetically by author. Those authors in bold have been recommended by one or more people as being generally mindfucking - any books listed under their names are particularly odd. You're welcome to /msg me to make an addition to this list. And finally, although he's way down at the bottom, my personal recommendation is definitely Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States, as it turns the ultimate mindfuck: inverting the world-view of our entire culture, and it is non-fiction.

Great Books Lists: Lists of Classics, Eastern and Western As seen in A Guide to Oriental Classics, Whole Earth magazine, Winter 2002. (A revised version of the article is available at author Kevin Kelly's Cool Tools site.) This page: Introduction | Western Canon | Eastern and World Canons | Contemporary Canon | Other Lists of Great Books | My Reading Lists | Indexes to these Great Books Lists Introduction Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) What are the Great Books? Western Canon Eastern and World Canons Approaches to the Asian Classics. Contemporary Canon Other Lists of Great Books Other Lists of Great Books - An annotated bibliography of some other sources of Great Books lists, both in books and on the Web My Reading Lists My Reading Lists (Ancient Near East, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, China, Middle Ages) Indexes to these Great Books Lists

Top Fantasy Books and Series : Sword Blog You are here: Home / Fantasy / Top Fantasy Books and Series Top Fantasy Books and Series-List of best 10 fantasy book series. Fantasy sagas i love the most. Tolkien, Glen Cook, Steven Erikson, R. E. My Top 10 Fantasy book Sagas 1. Lord of the Rings-Top fantasy books Legendary fantasy series. Lord of the Rings books: The Fellowship of the Ring The Two Towers The Return of the King2. The Black Company Excellent dark fantasy about Black Company, an elite legion pf mercenaries who fighting for money and fame. The Black Company books: The Books of the North The Black Company Shadows Linger The White Rose Black company story continues in The Books of South and in The Books of the Glittering Stone. 3. Malazan Book of Fallen Awesome fantasy epic saga focused on wars in Malazan empire. Malazan saga books: Gardens of the Moon Deadhouse Gates Memories of Ice House of Chains Midnight Tides The Bonehunters Reaper’s Gale Toll the Hounds Dust of Dreams The Crippled God 4. The Witcher 5. A Song of Ice and Fire

Post-Apocalyptic Fiction in Movies and Television: From the Landscape of Fiction The science fiction movie Logan's Run is an important expression of our society's central myth. It depicts a future humanity sealed off from the world in a high-tech city that is modeled after a mall and a giant singles complex, and governed by a dictator-computer. Among other things, the movie is about our fear that we are being infantilized by technology and turned into a society of techno-narcissists who substitute a fake life of superficial pleasures for an authentic existence. It depicts those in power as manipulating us into regressing into this artificial world of trivial pursuits because it is in their interest to do so. In addition to depicting contemporary society, the movie offers a disguised and explicit depictions of the family, the mind, the act of birth, and stories from the Old and New Testament and from pagan mythology. This essay will probably be of interest primarily to hardcore fans and theoreticians.

12.08.2010 - Our brains are wired so we can better hear ourselves speak, new study shows Like the mute button on the TV remote control, our brains filter out unwanted noise so we can focus on what we’re listening to. But when it comes to following our own speech, a new brain study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that instead of one homogenous mute button, we have a network of volume settings that can selectively silence and amplify the sounds we make and hear. Activity in the auditory cortex when we speak and listen is amplified in some regions of the brain and muted in others. In this image, the black line represents muting activity when we speak. (Courtesy of Adeen Flinker) Neuroscientists from UC Berkeley, UCSF and Johns Hopkins University tracked the electrical signals emitted from the brains of hospitalized epilepsy patients. Their findings, published today (Dec. 8, 2010) in the Journal of Neuroscience, offer new clues about how we hear ourselves above the noise of our surroundings and monitor what we say.

10 Novels That Will Disturb Even the Coldest of Hearts [Editor's note: While your Flavorwire editors take a much-needed holiday break, we're revisiting some of our most popular features of the year. This post was originally published May 18, 2011.] Jezebel-writer Anna North’s debut novel, America Pacifica, is out today. “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor In this short story, a family gets in a car accident and encounters a godless trio led by an escaped convict known as “the Misfit.” A Unified List of the Best 100 Novels « neilb This list was generated by merging 10 different ‘top 100′ lists from the UK, US, Australia and Canada, to see if the cream floated to the top. The lists are a mixture of public popularity and literary merit. Interestingly, only one book appeared on every list: it’s in first place here. Note that I merged lists from English-speaking countries, so there is undoubtedly a bias towards books originally written in English. Where possible, book titles are linked through to the Project Gutenberg free ebook. When the BBC ran The Big Read, I set myself a goal of reading all of the Big Read Top 100. An online search for other lists quickly revealed that certain books appear near the top of most lists (Great Expectations, for example), others vary widely (for example Ulysses), and some books only appear on one list (national favourites, such as Tim Winton’s excellent Cloudstreet, from Australia). The only editing of the list I’ve done is to collapse series down to a single entry, where appropriate.

The 50 Books Everyone Needs to Read, 1963-2013 The thing about reading is this: it takes a long time. There are innumerable books in the world, and many more good ones than can be read by any mortal in a lifetime. It’s hard to choose — especially if you’re a slow reader. So, to go along with the list of the best albums from 1963-2013, here you will find a single must-read book from each of the last 50 years. 1963 — The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath Sylvia Plath’s only novel manages to be both elegant and filled with raw, seething emotion – no small feat, and not the least of the reasons the reading world is still obsessed with her. Also recommended: Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak; The Group, Mary McCarthy; V., Thomas Pynchon; Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut; The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan

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