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8 math talks to blow your mind

8 math talks to blow your mind
Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways? Here, he tells of his travels around the continent in search of an answer. How big is infinity? There are more whole numbers than there are even numbers … right? Arthur Benjamin does “Mathemagic” A whole team of calculators is no match for Arthur Benjamin, as he does astounding mental math in the blink of an eye. Scott Rickard: The beautiful math behind the ugliest music What makes a piece of music beautiful?

http://blog.ted.com/2012/11/21/8-math-talks-to-blow-your-mind/

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You Can Easily Learn 100 TED Talks Lessons In 5 Minutes Which Most People Need 70 Hours For The other week I watched 70 hours of TED talks; short, 18-minute talks given by inspirational leaders in the fields of Technology,Entertainment, and Design (TED). I watched 296 talks in total, and I recently went through the list of what I watched, weeded out the crappy and boring talks, and created a list of the 100 best things I learned ! This article isn’t entirely about productivity, but I guarantee you’ll learn a thing or two. Here are 100 incredible things I learned watching 70 hours of TED talks last week!

How to embrace the near-win: Sarah Lewis at TED2014 Sarah Lewis. Photo: Bret Hartman “In that moment, my view of success and creativity changed,” says Lewis. What is Mathematics: Gödel's Theorem and Around. Incompleteness. By K. Podnieks what is mathematics, logic, mathematics, foundations, incompleteness theorem, mathematical, Gödel, Godel, book, Goedel, tutorial, textbook, methodology, philosophy, nature, theory, formal, axiom, theorem, incompleteness, online, web, free, download, teaching, learning, study, student, Podnieks, Karlis Personal page - click here. Visiting Gödel Places in Vienna, December 2012 K.Podnieks. Frege’s Puzzle from a Model-Based Point of View.

TOP 10 IMPOSSIBLE INVENTIONS THAT WORK « Revolutionizing Awareness Searl Effects Generator by Jeane Manning When Leonardo da Vinci sketched out an impossible invention, fifteenth-century scholars probably put him down. Forget it, Leon. If machines could fly, we’d know about it. How does Tupper’s self-referential formula work? [I write this post with a certain degree of embarrassment, because in the end it turns out (1) to be more simple than I anticipated, and (2) already done before, as I could have found if I had internet access when I did this. :-)] The so-called “Tupper’s self-referential formula” is the following, due to Jeff Tupper. Graph the set of all points such that in the regionwhere N is the following 544-digit integer: 48584506361897134235820959624942020445814005879832445494830930850619 34704708809928450644769865524364849997247024915119110411605739177407 85691975432657185544205721044573588368182982375413963433822519945219 16512843483329051311931999535024137587652392648746133949068701305622 95813219481113685339535565290850023875092856892694555974281546386510 73004910672305893358605254409666435126534936364395712556569593681518 43348576052669401612512669514215505395545191537854575257565907405401 57929001765967965480064427829131488548259914721248506352686630476300 The result is the following graph: .

Jeremy Howard: The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn What happens when we teach a computer how to learn? Technologist Jeremy Howard shares some surprising new developments in the fast-moving field of deep learning, a technique that can give computers the ability to learn Chinese, or to recognize objects in photos, or to help think through a medical diagnosis. (One deep learning tool, after watching hours of YouTube, taught itself the concept of “cats.”) Get caught up on a field that will change the way the computers around you behave … sooner than you probably think. This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxBrussels, an independent event.

12 pieces of advice for giving talks that have impact Courtney E. Martin hosts a session called “The 19th Minute,” and shared valuable insight on how to give a talk that has real impact. Photo: Marla Aufmuth/TED Sharing an idea isn’t like snapping your fingers — things don’t just instantly change. But as more people hear an idea over time, it can trickle into people’s thinking — and shifts, both subtle and extreme, can happen as a result. In a TEDWomen session called “The 19th Minute,” host Courtney E.

Another Look at Prime Numbers Primes are numeric celebrities: they're used in movies, security codes, puzzles, and are even the subject of forlorn looks from university professors. But mathematicians delight in finding the first 20 billion primes, rather than giving simple examples of why primes are useful and how they relate to what we know. Somebody else can discover the "largest prime" -- today let's share intuitive insights about why primes rock: Primes are building blocks of all numbers. Introduction to Global Energy Transmission Project aka Global Energy Transmission As of today, at least 40% of the world’s electric power still comes from coal, despite scientific and technical achievements that have been made so far. So, coal yet plays a very important role in modern life.

The Paradox of the Proof On August 31, 2012, Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki posted four papers on the Internet. The titles were inscrutable. The volume was daunting: 512 pages in total. The claim was audacious: he said he had proved the ABC Conjecture, a famed, beguilingly simple number theory problem that had stumped mathematicians for decades. Then Mochizuki walked away.

David Epstein: Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger? When you look at sporting achievements over the last decades, it seems like humans have gotten faster, better and stronger in nearly every way. Yet as David Epstein points out in this delightfully counter-intuitive talk, we might want to lay off the self-congratulation. Many factors are at play in shattering athletic records, and the development of our natural talents is just one of them. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page. 10 talks you won't be able to stop thinking about Now playing Here's a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven Pinker is gradually, brilliantly persuaded by philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein that reason is actually the key driver of human moral progress, even if its effect sometimes takes generations to unfold. The dialog was recorded live at TED, and animated, in incredible, often hilarious, detail by Cognitive.

Zipf, Power-law, Pareto - a ranking tutorial Lada A. Adamic Information Dynamics Lab Information Dynamics Lab, HP Labs Palo Alto, CA 94304 A line appears on a log-log plot. PowerPedia:Testatika From PESWiki Update, September 2012: I called the Methernitha commune about coming for a visit, and learned that 1) the inventor passed away a couple of years ago, 2) no one at the commune is continuing with the technology, 3) they don't know who has knowledge about how the system works. They didn't seem interested in propagating it in any way. -- Sterling D. Allan The Testatika is an electromagnetic/electrostatic generator based on the 1989 Pidgeon electrostatic machine which includes an inductance circuit, a capacitance circuit, and a thermionic rectification valve.

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