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Doodling in Math: Spirals, Fibonacci, and Being a Plant [1 of 3]

Doodling in Math: Spirals, Fibonacci, and Being a Plant [1 of 3]
Related:  Mathematics

Michelle Jenneke 'Creeper' Is Everyone On The Internet Right Now While the innocence of 19-year-old Australian hurdler Michelle Jenneke's warm-up routine is debatable, there's no two ways about the slow-motion re-cut of it that went viral last week. Yes, her milkshake brought all the boys to the Web. And now that collective leer has its own avatar: the Creeper. Digitom Productions posted a spoof in which a lad (that's Canadian for "bro," right?) Like millions of other people -- members of the sports blogosphere definitely included -- he's shameless, gross and totally predictable. But that's why it's funny, isn't it? The spoof, which contains some key moments from Jenneke's now famous IAAF World Junior Championships women's 100-meter hurdle heat, has been viewed more than 1.1 million times since it debuted on YouTube on July 21. Judging by the rest of the Digitom's YouTube offerings, this kind of thing is basically their wheelhouse.

Another Look at Prime Numbers Primes are numeric celebrities: they're used in movies, security codes, puzzles, and are even the subject of forlorn looks from university professors. But mathematicians delight in finding the first 20 billion primes, rather than giving simple examples of why primes are useful and how they relate to what we know. Somebody else can discover the "largest prime" -- today let's share intuitive insights about why primes rock: Primes are building blocks of all numbers. So what are prime numbers again? A basic tenet of math is that any number can be written as the multiplication of primes. And primes are numbers that can't be divided further, like 3, 5, 7, or 23. Well, 1 is special and isn't considered prime, since things get crazy because 1 = 1 * 1 * 1... and so on. Rewriting a number into primes is called prime decomposition, math speak for "find the factors". Well, not really. Analogy: Prime Numbers and Chemical Formulas Prime numbers are like atoms. Water = H20 = two hydrogens and one oxygen

untitled Data Visualization of Pi's digits ▲ 2013 day ▲ 2014 day ▲ 2015 day ▲ 2014 approx day ▲ Circular art This section contains various art work based on , and that I created over the years. day art and approximation day art is kept separate. All of the posters are listed in the posters section. Circular and spiral art based on the digits of , and . Read about how they were made and browse through the posters. Some of the art shown here has been featured in a Numberphile video. Fri 10-07-2015 The Jurassic World Creation Lab webpage shows you how one might create a dinosaur from a sample of DNA. ▲ We can't get dinosaur genomics right, but we can get it less wrong. With enough time, you'll grow your own brand new dinosaur. What went wrong? ▲ Corn World: Teeth on the Cob. Thu 11-06-2015 I was commissioned by Scientific American to create an information graphic based on Figure 9 in the landmark Nature Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes paper. ▲ Network diagram redesign of the heatmap for a select set of traits.

Johnny Carson Upload Subscription preferences Loading... Working... Johnny Carson Johnny Carson's Official YouTube Channel 45,722 views 4 months ago Johnny Carson's Official YouTube Channel is at Read more Full Episodes of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson Play "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" has released full episodes of the show on Johnny Carson's official YouTube channel, for the first time. Celebrities Playlist on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show Celebrity guest appearances on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" between 1962 and 1992 including Jim Carrey, Steve Martin, Arnold Schwarzenegger, EllenDegeneres, Robin Williams, Jonathan Winters, Whoopi Goldberg, Kirstie Alley, Eddie Murphy, Jimmy Stewart, Jane Fonda, Michael J. Comedians on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" Uploads Play Impressions on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show Impressions of Elvis Presley, Poltergeist, Foreign Man, and more on the Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Popular uploads

The Prime Pages (prime number research, records and resources) Muslim rule and compass: the magic of Islamic geometric design | Science To paraphrase Monty Python, what has Islam ever done for us? You know, apart from the algebra, the trigonometry, the optics, the astronomy and the many other scientific advances and inventions of the Islamic Golden Age. Well, if you like art and interiors, there’s always the stunning patterns that grace mosques, madrasas and palaces around the world. Islamic craftsmen and artists – who were prohibited from making representations of people in holy sites – developed an instantly recognizable aesthetic based on repeated geometrical shapes. The mathematical elegance of these designs is that no matter how elaborate they are, they are always based on grids constructed using only a ruler and a pair of compasses. Islamic design is based on Greek geometry, which teaches us that starting with very basic assumptions, we can build up a remarkable number of proofs about shapes. Dust off your old geometry set, and let’s see how. The template has a circle in a square, divided into 12 equal sections.

Zipf, Power-law, Pareto - a ranking tutorial Lada A. Adamic Information Dynamics Lab Information Dynamics Lab, HP Labs Palo Alto, CA 94304 A line appears on a log-log plot. All three terms are used to describe phenomena where large events are rare, but small ones quite common. Zipf's law usually refers to the 'size' y of an occurrence of an event relative to it's rank r. Pareto was interested in the distribution of income. What is usually called a power law distribution tells us not how many people had an income greater than x, but the number of people whose income is exactly x. Although the literature surrounding both the Zipf and Pareto distributions is vast, there are very few direct connections made between Zipf and Pareto, and when they exist, it is by way of a vague reference [1] or an overly complicated mathematical analysis[2,3]. Figure 1a below shows the distribution of AOL users' visits to various sites on a December day in 1997. Let y = number of sites that were visited by x users. Acknowledgements References 1. 2. 3. 4.

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