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Angela Davis

Angela Davis
Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is an American political activist, scholar, and author. She emerged as a nationally prominent counterculture activist and radical in the 1960s, as a leader of the Communist Party USA, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement despite never being an official member of the party. Prisoner rights have been among her continuing interests; she is the founder of Critical Resistance, an organization working to abolish the prison-industrial complex. She is a retired professor with the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is the former director of the university's Feminist Studies department.[2] Her research interests are in feminism, African-American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons. Early life[edit] Davis attended Carrie A. Education[edit] Related:  Social change advocates

Thich Nhat Hanh Thích Nhất Hạnh (/ˈtɪk ˈnjʌt ˈhʌn/; Vietnamese: [tʰǐk ɲɜ̌t hɐ̂ʔɲ] ( ); born October 11, 1926) is a Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk, teacher, author, poet and peace activist. He lives in the Plum Village Monastery in the Dordogne region in the South of France,[1] travelling internationally to give retreats and talks. Nhất Hạnh has published more than 100 books, including more than 40 in English. Biography[edit] Buddha hall of the Từ Hiếu Temple Born as Nguyễn Xuân Bảo, Nhất Hạnh was born in the city of Quảng Ngãi in Central Vietnam in 1926. In 1956, he was named editor-in-chief of Vietnamese Buddhism, the periodical of the Unified Vietnam Buddhist Association (Giáo Hội Phật Giáo Việt Nam Thống Nhất). Nhat Hanh is now recognized as a Dharmacharya and as the spiritual head of the Từ Hiếu Temple and associated monasteries.[7][10] On May 1, 1966 at Từ Hiếu Temple, Thich Nhat Hanh received the "lamp transmission", making him a Dharmacharya or Dharma Teacher, from Master Chân Thật.[7] Approach[edit]

Stetson Kennedy William Stetson Kennedy (October 5, 1916 – August 27, 2011) was an American author and human rights activist. One of the pioneer folklore collectors during the first half of the 20th century, he is remembered for having infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in the 1940s, exposing its secrets to authorities and the outside world. His actions led to the 1947 revocation by the state of Georgia of the Klan's national corporate charter.[1] Kennedy wrote or co-wrote ten books. Biography and activities[edit] Kennedy was named for a member of his mother's family, the hatter John Batterson Stetson.[1] As a teenager, he began collecting folklore material while seeking "a dollar down and dollar a week" accounts for his father, a furniture merchant. In 1937, he left the University of Florida to join the WPA Florida Writers' Project, and at the age of 21, was put in charge of folklore, oral history, and ethnic studies. In 2007 St. Kennedy in 1991 Beluthahatchee Park[edit] It's preposterous.

Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh: only love can save us from climate change | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh, one of the world's leading spiritual teachers, is a man at great peace even as he predicts the possible collapse of civilisation within 100 years as a result of runaway climate change. The 86-year-old Vietnamese monk, who has hundreds of thousands of followers around the world, believes the reason most people are not responding to the threat of global warming, despite overwhelming scientific evidence, is that they are unable to save themselves from their own personal suffering, never mind worry about the plight of Mother Earth. Thay, as he is known, says it is possible to be at peace if you pierce through our false reality, which is based on the idea of life and death, to touch the ultimate dimension in Buddhist thinking, in which energy cannot be created or destroyed. Look beyond fear "Our perception of time may help," Thay told me in his modest home in Plum Village monastery near Bordeaux. Confront the truth "They want to get busy in order to forget.

Grace Lee Boggs Her life is the subject of American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, released in 2013. Biography[edit] When C.L.R. James and Raya Dunayevskaya split in the mid-1950s into Correspondence Publishing Committee led by James and News and Letters led by Dunayevskaya, Grace Lee Boggs and James Boggs supported Correspondence Publishing Committee which C.L.R. In 1962, the Boggses broke with C.L.R. She founded Detroit Summer, a multicultural intergenerational youth program, in 1992 and has also been the recipient of numerous awards. Bibliography[edit] Facing Reality (with C.L.R. References[edit] Paul Buhle, "An Asian-American Tale" Monthly Review (January 1999), pp. 47–50.Grace Lee Boggs, Living for Change: An Autobiography (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998).Martin Glaberman, "The Revolutionary Optimist: Remembering C.L.R. External links[edit] The Boggs Center Home Page Video[edit]

Engaged Buddhism Engaged Buddhism refers to Buddhists who are seeking ways to apply the insights from meditation practice and dharma teachings to situations of social, political, environmental, and economic suffering and injustice. Finding its roots in Vietnam through the Zen Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh, Engaged Buddhism has grown in popularity in the West.[1] Asian Origins[edit] This term has since been re-translated back into Chinese as "Left-wing Buddhism" (左翼佛教) to denote the liberal emphasis held by this type of Buddhism. The term has also been used as a translation for what is commonly understood in China and Taiwan as "Humanistic Buddhism" (人間佛教). Western Socially Engaged Buddhism[edit] In the West, like the East, Engaged Buddhism is a way of attempting to link authentic Buddhist meditation with social action.[6][7] The current Dalai Lama has voiced a need for Buddhists to be more involved in the social and political realm. See also[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit] External links[edit]

Ward Churchill Ward LeRoy Churchill (born October 2, 1947) is an American author and political activist. He was a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado Boulder from 1990 to 2007. The primary focus of his work is on the historical treatment of political dissenters and Native Americans by the United States government. His work features controversial and provocative views, written in a direct, often confrontational style.[1] In January 2005, Churchill's work attracted publicity because of the widespread circulation of a 2001 essay, "On the Justice of Roosting Chickens". In March 2005 the University of Colorado began investigating allegations that Churchill had engaged in research misconduct; it reported in June 2006 that he had done so.[3] Churchill was fired on July 24, 2007,[4] leading to a claim by some scholars that he was fired because of the "Little Eichmanns" comment.[5] Churchill filed a lawsuit against the University of Colorado for unlawful termination of employment.

Cesar Chavez Cesar Chavez (born César Estrada Chávez, locally: [ˈsesaɾ esˈtɾaða ˈtʃaβes]; March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was an American farm worker, labor leader and civil rights activist, who, with Dolores Huerta, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (later the United Farm Workers union, UFW).[1] A Mexican American, Chavez became the best known Latino American civil rights activist, and was strongly promoted by the American labor movement, which was eager to enroll Hispanic members. His public-relations approach to unionism and aggressive but nonviolent tactics made the farm workers' struggle a moral cause with nationwide support. By the late 1970s, his tactics had forced growers to recognize the UFW as the bargaining agent for 50,000 field workers in California and Florida. However, by the mid-1980s membership in the UFW had dwindled to around 15,000.[2] Early life and education The Chavez family faced many hardships in California. Activism Worker's rights Animal rights Controversies

Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. Early life and education King was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia, to Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King.[1] King's legal name at birth was Michael King,[2]and his father was also born Michael King, but the elder King changed his and his son's names following a 1934 trip to Germany to attend the Fifth Baptist World Alliance Congress in Berlin. Doctoral studies Religion

José Mujica He has been described as "the world's 'poorest' president", due to his austere lifestyle and his donation of around 90 percent of his $12,000 (£7,500) monthly salary to charities that benefit poor people and small entrepreneurs.[1][2] Early life[edit] Guerrilla leader[edit] In the early 1960s, he joined the newly formed Tupamaros movement, an armed political group inspired by the Cuban revolution.[5] He participated in the 1969 brief takeover of Pando, a town close to Montevideo, and was later convicted by a military tribunal under the government of Jorge Pacheco Areco, who had suspended certain constitutional guarantees.[6][7] Mujica was captured by the authorities on four occasions, and he was among those political prisoners who escaped Punta Carretas Prison in 1971.[8] He was eventually re-apprehended in 1972, and was shot by the police six times. Minister of Agriculture[edit] Political positions[edit] Mujica's political ideology has evolved over the years from orthodox to pragmatist.

Mumia Abu-Jamal Mumia Abu-Jamal (born Wesley Cook[1] on April 24, 1954) is an American prisoner convicted for the 1981 murder of Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner.[2] His original sentence of death, handed down at his first trial in July 1982, was commuted to life imprisonment without parole in 2012.[3] Described as "perhaps the world's best known death-row inmate" by The New York Times,[4] supporters and detractors have disagreed on his guilt, whether he received a fair trial, and the appropriateness of the death penalty.[5][6][7] Born in Philadelphia, Abu-Jamal became involved in black nationalism in his youth, and was a member of the Black Panther Party until October 1970. Alongside his political activism, he became a radio journalist, eventually becoming president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. On December 9, 1981, Officer Faulkner was shot dead while conducting a traffic stop on Abu-Jamal's brother, William Cook. Early life and activism[edit] Daniel Faulkner

Deng Fei goes beyond journalism to right wrongs in China Investigative reporter Deng Fei won plaudits and nearly 3 million Chinese microblog followers with a string of articles on sensitive topics such as child trafficking, organ harvesting from death-penalty victims, and shoddy school construction. Skip to next paragraph Deng Fei (l.) began an influential blog that encourages readers to contribute to solutions. His latest cause: better nutrition for some 26 million rural schoolchildren. Peter Ford/The Christian Science Monitor Subscribe Today to the Monitor Click Here for your FREE 30 DAYS ofThe Christian Science MonitorWeekly Digital Edition Now he is parlaying his reputation into a groundbreaking project to turn his readers into active agents of social change in China. Last year Mr. "Journalists can do more than just write articles. Deng made his name over the past 10 years with articles published in Phoenix magazine in Hong Kong, where censorship is not the problem it is in mainland China. Then he took an unusual step for a journalist.

Malala Yousafzai Malala Yousafzai (Pashto: ملاله یوسفزۍ‎ [mə ˈlaː lə . ju səf ˈzəj];[2] Urdu: ملالہ یوسف زئی‎ Malālah Yūsafzay, born 12 July 1997)[3] is a Pakistani school pupil and education activist from the town of Mingora in the Swat District of Pakistan's northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. She is known for her activism for rights to education and for women, especially in the Swat Valley, where the Taliban had at times banned girls from attending school. In early 2009, at the age of 11–12, Yousafzai wrote a blog under a pseudonym for the BBC detailing her life under Taliban rule, their attempts to take control of the valley, and her views on promoting education for girls. On the morning of Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Malala boarded her school bus in the northwest Pakistani district of Swat. Early life Yousafzai started speaking about education rights as early as September 2008, when her father took her to Peshawar to speak at the local press club. BBC blogger Banned from school Refugee

Tank Man Coordinates: "Tank Man" temporarily stops the advance of a column of tanks on June 5, 1989, in Beijing, in what is widely considered one of the iconic images of the 20th century.[1][2][3] This photograph (one of four similar versions) was taken by Jeff Widener of the Associated Press. The Tank Man, or the Unknown Protester, is the nickname of an anonymous man who stood in front of a column of tanks on June 5, 1989, the morning after the Chinese military had suppressed the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 by force. The man achieved widespread international recognition due to the videotape and photographs taken of the incident. The incident[edit] The incident took place near Tiananmen on Chang'an Avenue, which runs east-west along the south end of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China on June 5, 1989, one day after the Chinese government's violent crackdown on the Tiananmen protests. Identity and fate[edit] International notability and censorship[edit] Photographic versions[edit] Notes[edit]

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