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Computer-Based Math: How to Fix Math Education

Online Python Tutor - Learn programming by visualizing code execution A Really, Really Cool Website For Students Who Think They Hate Math The best resource for a student that thinks they hate math is a great teacher. But what about the best resource for that teacher? Beyond an active imagination, ability to relate to students, and an incredibly strong content knowledge themselves, it may not get much better than Numberphile . While the site is simple a crudely interactive graphic with links to videos, it has, in one fell swoop, creatively curated some of the most compelling and engaging “problems” in mathematics. Fantastic resource for bell ringers, test questions, math project-based learning ideas, or as a model for students to curate their own curiosities about the incredible–and poorly marketed–world of mathematics. It’s also, incidentally, a YouTube channel as well, from which we’ve taken a sample video below.

Program in Mathematics Education - PRIME - Michigan State University — MSU Program in Math Education World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) 10 Unusual Ways to Explore Math I confess. I never really liked math. I played the school game well so I received pretty good grades, but after I passed the test (even after receiving an A in most cases), those rules, theorems and facts didn’t stick around for very long. The problem was everything was drilled into me, or as I like to think now, drilled out of me. I’m so excited that now, as an adult, I have the time and opportunity to get to know math all over again with my kids. Over the next few weeks, I’m going to take subjects traditionally taught in schools, one subject each week, and show you how they can be looked at in unusual ways. Here’s a list of ten unusual ways to look at math. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Do you have any ideas about how math is connected in unusual ways to your world? Did you like this post? Photo Credit: fdecomite

Top 10 Programming Languages to Learn in 2014 Updated on May 5, 2014 Having spent more than 5 years in software development and the computer programming arena, one of the most common questions I am asked is: This is a question that is asked by beginners, as well as experts. As with many important questions, the answer is not simple. There are many factors that should be taken into account while deciding a programming language to learn. Technology evolves in matter of weeks and by the time you become expert in a particular software technology, it can already be considered obsolete. In addition to that, another interesting aspect of programming that I noticed is that not only programmers and software engineers are interested in learning new programming languages, but people from totally different walks of life are also into it. Now back to the top 10. 1. I vividly remember that the first programming language course that I had in my university was of C language. 2. 3. Java was developed by James Gosling, in 1990 at Sun Microsystems. 5.

Mathletics – what’s it all about? | nhowie As a newly appointed Mathletics Lead Educator I thought I’d jot down a few points about why I thought we use this system. Mathletics (from 3P Learning) is an online Mathematics programme that we have used at BIS since 2006 with all out KS1-Ks3 (Years R-9/K-8). There are two sides to it for a student. The first is the curriculum side, which can be tied to UK/US/AUS and other curricula for a student in any year/grade (so the majority could be doing tasks related to the year you are teaching, though a teacher can individually set a students to a different year if this is necessary). Curriculum use of Mathletics The other is a more fun-based educational side, the “Live Mathletics” in which students compete against others in a timed (1 minute) answer as many questions as you can (though 3 strikes and you are out). Live Mathletics In my ICT lesson we had been working on a topic that we’d just completed, following 3 weeks of work and still had 15 minutes of the lesson left.

student designs Dan Meyer Image by DavidErickson via Flickr There are some really great blogs out there written by maths teachers who really care about their practice. I enjoy reading their posts as they share their insight and ideas and think about how it could improve my own teaching. There is wheat and there is chaff out there. To save you time in separating the two, I have compiled this list of the best blogs I have found so far: f(t) Written by the highly witty and entertaining Kate Nowak, I love this blog for lots of reasons. I find her blog a useful way of ‘keeping the big picture in mind’ rather than becoming obsessed with the details all the time. Keeping Math Simple One of the best blogs I have found discussing pedagogy in maths teaching. “This blog isn’t about making math easy because it isn’t. There are regular blogs about using Geogebra effectively in teaching maths. Typical of the quality and thought provoking posts on this blog is “Teaching algebraic thinking without the x’s“. Math for Primates dy/dan

Code Avengers: learn to code games, apps and websites Math for Teaching Mohawke's Best of the Best Free and Open Source Software Collection: Mac OS X and Windows software Collection Mohawke's Best of the Best Free and Open Source Software Collection from Dark Artistry :: Windows :: Macintosh :: Internet :: Operating Systems :: Games :: Web-Sites :: OSSWIN CD :: For search features you can simply use the search feature in your browser; Ctrl+F or Apple+F - Firefox, or use table toolsIf you need these pages translated check out FoxLingo(This page contains no ads or cookies, but does require a javascript enabled browser for sorting.) Access

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