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Neoformix - Discovering and Illustrating Patterns in Data

Neoformix - Discovering and Illustrating Patterns in Data

http://neoformix.com/

Related:  Data Viz Trends

chartsnthings 19 Sketches of Quarterback Timelines On Sunday Eli Manning started his 150th consecutive game for the Giants, the highest active streak in the NFL and the third-longest streak in NFL history. (One of the other two people above him is his brother, Peyton.) The graphics department published an interactive graphic that put Eli’s streak in the context of about 2,000 streaks from about 500 pro quarterbacks. The graphic lets you explore the qbs and search for any quarterback or explore a team to go down memory lane for your team. It’s not particularly important news, but the data provided by pro-football-reference is incredibly detailed and the concept lended itself to a variety of sketches.

Tutorials How to Edit R Charts in Adobe Illustrator A detailed guide for R users who want to polish their charts in the popular graphic design app for readability and aesthetics. How to Make an Animated Map in R, Part 4 Bio – Marius Watz Marius Watz (NO) is an artist working with visual abstraction through generative software processes. His work focuses on the synthesis of form as the product of parametric behaviors. He is known for hard-edged geometrical forms and vivid colors, with outputs ranging from pure software works to public projections and physical objects produced with digital fabrication technology.

37 Data-ish Blogs You Should Know About You might not know it, but there are actually a ton of data and visualization blogs out there. I'm a bit of a feed addict subscribing to just about anything with a chart or a mention of statistics on it (and naturally have to do some feed-cleaning every now and then). In a follow up to my short list last year, here are the data-ish blogs, some old and some new, that continue to post interesting stuff. Data and Statistics By the Numbers - Column from The New York Times visual Op-ed columnist, Charles Blow, who also used to be NYT's graphics director.Data Mining - Matthew Hurst, scientist at Microsoft's MSN, also the co-creator of BlogPulse.Statistical Modeling - We might disagree on certain things, but Andrew's blog is one of the few active pure statistics blogs.The Numbers Guy - Data-minded reporting from Carl Bialik of the Wall Street Journal.Basketball Geek - Like statistical analysis and basketball? Statistical/Analytical Visualization

feltron Mapping Neighborhoods in Boston, San Francisco and New York. Hand-drawn animation of 43 years of the Sun’s weather. (via kottke) William Stone Branching Drawings (identified by wowgreat) Geometric choropleths 1895 vs 1978 Tools on Datavisualization A Carefully Selected List of Recommended Tools 07 May 2012 Tools Flash, JavaScript, Processing, R When I meet with people and talk about our work, I get asked a lot what technology we use to create interactive and dynamic data visualizations. To help you get started, we have put together a selection of the tools we use the most and that we enjoy working with. Read more Pathline: Connecting Designers With Scientists

Maps with R (I) This is the first post of a short series to show some code I have learnt to produce maps with R. Some time ago I found this infographic from The New York Times (via this page) and I wondered how a multivariate choropleth map could be produced with R. Here is the code I have arranged to show the results of the last Spanish general elections in a similar fashion. Some packages are needed: Let’s start with the data, which is available here (thanks to Emilio Torres, who “massaged” the original dataset, available from here). Each region of the map will represent the percentage of votes obtained by the predominant political option. Latest As I mentioned in my previous post, our collaboration with the Sabeti Lab is aimed at creating new visual exploration tools to help researchers, doctors, and clinicians discover patterns and associations in large health and epidemiological datasets. These tools will be the first step in a hypothesis-generation process, combining intuition from expert users with visualization techniques and automated algorithms, allowing users to quickly test hypothesis that are “suggested” by the data itself. Researchers and doctors have a deep familiarity with their data and often can tell immediately when a new pattern is potentially interesting or simply the result of noise. Visualization techniques will help articulate their knowledge to a wider audience.

Fast Thinking and Slow Thinking Visualisation Last week I attended the Association of American Geographers Annual Conference and heard a talk by Robert Groves, Director of the US Census Bureau. Aside the impressiveness of the bureau’s work I was struck by how Groves conceived of visualisations as requiring either fast thinking or slow thinking. Fast thinking data visualisations offer a clear message without the need for the viewer to spend more than a few seconds exploring them.

A History of Data Visualisation Compiled by Carte figurative des pertes successives en hommes de l'Armée Française dans la campagne de Russie 1812-1813 by Charles Joseph Minard Of all the attempts to convey the futility of Napoleon's attempt to invade Russia and the utter destruction of his Grande Armee in the last months of 1812, no written work or painting presents such a compelling picture as does Minard's graphic. Charles Joseph Minard's Napoleon map, along with several dozen others that he published during his lifetime, set the standard for excellence in graphically depicting flows of people and goods in space, yet his role in the development of modern thematic mapping techniques is all too often overlooked. Communication of Cartographic Information by A Kolacny Seen in Montello, David. (2002).

Visualizing Facebook Friends: Eye Candy in R Earlier this week I published a data visualization on the Facebook Engineering blog which, to my surprise, has received a lot of media coverage I’ve received a lot comments about the image, many asking for more details on how I created it. When I tell people I used R, the reaction I get is roughly what I would expect if I told them I made it with Microsoft Paint and a bottle of Jägermeister. Matthew Ericson – ericson.net The winners of the 34th Edition of the Best of News Design contest were released today, so I’ve updated my interactive crosstab of SND winners that lets you see at a glance which publications won awards in which categories. One particularly interesting thing to me: There were only 19 awards give in the information graphics categories — 17 for individual works and 2 for portfolios. That’s down from 97 just three years ago. I’d be curious to know how much of the decline comes from fewer print graphics being produced in general in newspapers — and probably also fewer entries in the contest — and how much is from a different, and much tougher, set of judges than in past years. Just pushed out an update to the Adobe Illustrator MultiExporter script that lets you specify if you want to export PNGs and JPGs at a different scale factor so that you can generate versions of the images at double resolution for iPhone retina displays. I’ve posted the slides from my presentation as a PDF.

How and why you should do data journalism One of the big areas of focus for technology companies over the past year has been “big data” — in other words, the idea that there can be a lot of value in finding patterns in the massive quantities of user data and other information that a business generates. This has a corollary in journalism too: namely, the growing realization that there is a lot of value in finding patterns in news-related information. This weekend saw the launch of an e-book that could be a useful resource for anyone planning to explore that field: The Data Journalism Handbook. What makes data journalism different from regular journalism?

cartophile "The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print." [wikipedia] Including such places as:

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