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Understanding by Design

Understanding by Design
Passive versus imperative linking As we know, links are the best part of non-linearity. “Writers worry about whether links will distract users. To discuss this concern, we need to begin by distinguishing between imperative links that command the reader to click and passive links that merely make finding ancillary material easier.” (Mark Baker ~ Every page is one) Interaction design for the internet of things

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Junk Charts Via Twitter, Bart S (@BartSchuijt) sent me to this TechCrunch article, which contains several uninspiring charts. The most disturbing one is this: There is a classic Tufte class here: only five numbers and yet the chart is so confusing. And yes, they reversed the axis. Lower means higher "app abandonment" and higher means lower "app abandonment". The co-existence of the data labels, gridlines, and axis labels increases processing time without adding information. IAN Symbol Libraries (Free Vector Symbols and Icons) - Integration and Application Network The IAN symbol libraries currently contain 2925 custom made vector symbols designed specifically for enhancing science communication products with diagrammatic representations of complex processes. Our aim is to develop a global symbol language for scientists, resource managers, community groups, and environmentalists worldwide. Currently downloaded by 92233 users in 243 countries and 50 U.S. states.

Digital Photography - Stanford CS 178 - Digital Photography Spring Quarter, 2011 Marc Levoy Handout #2 Here is the current version of the course schedule. It is also available online at and will be continuously updated as changes are made. Jack van Wijk Jack (Jarke J.) van Wijk [pronunciation] is full professor in visualization at the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). He received a MSc degree in industrial design engineering in 1982 and a PhD degree in computer science in 1986, both from Delft University of Technology, both with honors. After a short period in the software industry, he has worked for ten years at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. He joined Eindhoven University of Technology in 1998, where he became a full professor of visualization in 2001.

feltron Mapping Neighborhoods in Boston, San Francisco and New York. Hand-drawn animation of 43 years of the Sun’s weather. (via kottke) William Stone Branching Drawings (identified by wowgreat) Matthew Ericson – ericson.net The winners of the 34th Edition of the Best of News Design contest were released today, so I’ve updated my interactive crosstab of SND winners that lets you see at a glance which publications won awards in which categories. One particularly interesting thing to me: There were only 19 awards give in the information graphics categories — 17 for individual works and 2 for portfolios. That’s down from 97 just three years ago. I’d be curious to know how much of the decline comes from fewer print graphics being produced in general in newspapers — and probably also fewer entries in the contest — and how much is from a different, and much tougher, set of judges than in past years. Just pushed out an update to the Adobe Illustrator MultiExporter script that lets you specify if you want to export PNGs and JPGs at a different scale factor so that you can generate versions of the images at double resolution for iPhone retina displays. I’ve posted the slides from my presentation as a PDF.

Traffic & Road Sign Test - part 1 Test your knowledge on the meanings of traffic and road signs. Part 1 of 5, consisting of 30 multiple choice questions. Grading is in real time after you submit the results and a detailed answer sheet is provided. Driving is a privilege, you are responsible for knowing what all traffic control signs mean. Understanding their meanings will make you a safer driver. Disclaimer - Much of this information was compiled from the Federal Highway Administration's website.

Colin Ware Colin Ware is the Director of the Data Visualization Research Lab which is part of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. He is cross appointed between the Departments of Ocean Engineering and Computer Science. Ware specializes in advanced data visualization and has a special interest in applications of visualization to Ocean Mapping. He combines interests in both basic and applied research and he has advanced degrees in both computer science (MMath, Waterloo) and in the psychology of perception (PhD,Toronto). 37 tools It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone.

Latest As I mentioned in my previous post, our collaboration with the Sabeti Lab is aimed at creating new visual exploration tools to help researchers, doctors, and clinicians discover patterns and associations in large health and epidemiological datasets. These tools will be the first step in a hypothesis-generation process, combining intuition from expert users with visualization techniques and automated algorithms, allowing users to quickly test hypothesis that are “suggested” by the data itself. Researchers and doctors have a deep familiarity with their data and often can tell immediately when a new pattern is potentially interesting or simply the result of noise. Visualization techniques will help articulate their knowledge to a wider audience.

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