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NOTCOT

NOTCOT
*NOTCOT in playful - 04.16.14 - 0 Notes Vertty: Geometric Beach Towels Growing up and living by the beach, my cars are never without a beach towel and flip flops. You never know when the mood might strike you! So i’ve been super intrigued by these Vertty Beach Towels since they surfaced on NOTCOT.org. Vertty just sent over a bright orange one today ~ and first impressions: awesome packaging, lightweight (1.5 lbs) , and love the unusual geometric shape with popping colors!

http://www.notcot.com/

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How to be a stylish designer.  You don’t know how to dress. Fashion has no meaning to you, other than buying a pair of jeans every two years or so. You don’t get the point of wearing anything otther than black. And there you are, a designer. Which means, you SHOULD be well-dressed, stylish, arty, whatever adjectives that fit your fancy.

ATELIER FIFTY FIVE African Design -En [Image credit: Truth Coffee Interior – Haldane Martin] The Steampunk aesthetic of science fiction with a dose of fantasy, and inspired by 19th-century Victorian industrial steam-powered machinery combined technology is proving an increasingly popular lifestyle culture, applied to everything from fashion to interiors. One such interior is that of Truth Coffee, a Cape Town-based café, coffee shop and dive bar whose fantastical interior transports you to the industrial workhouses of the Victorian era. Founded on an ethos of serving proper, fresh home-roasted coffee the team behind Truth Coffee sought a look and feel that would designer embody their philosophy, and collaborated with South African interior design and furniture brand Haldane Martin to achieve their vision. The result was turning their three-storey ageing warehouse into a Steampunk themed interior.

MODEL-MORPHOSIS - T Magazine Blog The photographer Greg Kessler captures behind-the-scenes beauty transformations during Spring 2015 Fashion Week in Paris. Here, the model Taya Ermoshkina before (left) and after (right) makeup by Pat McGrath and hair by Guido Palau. See more Model-Morphosis features Blog — Metalworks by Maxus The first-mover in the space belongs to the media publishers, most of them offering a condensed version of their app on the watch. The New York Times has introduced “one-sentence stories”, going as far as calling them a “new form of storytelling to help readers catch up in seconds.”[3] Others like The Economist leveraged the voice technology feature to read out its stories when users tap on a story from its Apple Watch app – in a British-accented voice! Jason Kint, CEO of Digital Content Next, a trade group for publishers that includes Conde Nast and the Times, said Apple Watch creates an opportunity for well-known media brands. "Everywhere and every minute, people are starving for access to reliable information, entertainment and news," he said. "Business models will follow." From a brand perspective, Melvin Wilson, a consultant with IPG Mediabrands sees the Apple Watch as a vehicle for sharing offers, coupons and loyalty rewards.

Photo Inspiration Who doesn’t love baby photography, One of the most challenging and time consuming type of photography. It is easily one of the hardest kinds just because of the sheer amount of unexpected drama with the kids. It is also one of the most popular kind of photography too. You see baby photography all around. This gives you an idea... read more The Sexperience 1000 Welcome to The Sexperience 1000, an interactive journey through the sexual experiences and preferences of one thousand British individuals. What’s the favourite sexual position of iPhone users in the North? Do country music lovers over 55 prefer to do it in the dark? Explore the 20 questions of our survey and discover what the great British public get up to between the sheets… Filter Filter by region, age, etc. and compare to yourself.

The Flight From Conversation At home, families sit together, texting and reading e-mail. At work executives text during board meetings. We text (and shop and go on Facebook) during classes and when we’re on dates. My students tell me about an important new skill: it involves maintaining eye contact with someone while you text someone else; it’s hard, but it can be done. Over the past 15 years, I’ve studied technologies of mobile connection and talked to hundreds of people of all ages and circumstances about their plugged-in lives. I’ve learned that the little devices most of us carry around are so powerful that they change not only what we do, but also who we are. Smart, dumb, candybar, flip, and brick: a visual history of mobile phones For most of their history, mobile phones have been shrinking. Small meant portable; it even, in the not too distant past, was a sort of status symbol. Remember Motorola’s runaway hit, the ultra-thin Razr? But something funny happened on the smartphone’s way to success. Even as the phones themselves became thinner and lighter, their screens started to grow.

Pretentious Is Not A Sexual Orientation ‘Sapiosexual’ has to be one of the stupidest sexual ‘identities’ to come along in years. New words with the suffix “-sexual” are like catnip for trendy straight people. In the late ’90s and early aughts, we collectively endured the “metrosexual,” a completely unnecessary term for a man who shaves and dares to have a few pastels in his wardrobe. And in the past year, we have watched the rise and fall of the “lumbersexual,” a completely unnecessary term for a man who doesn’t shave and wears flannel. Enter the “sapiosexual,” which Urban Dictionary defines as “one who finds intelligence the most sexually attractive feature.”

The Theory Generation If you studied the liberal arts in an American college anytime after 1980, you were likely exposed to what is universally called Theory. Perhaps you still possess some recognizable talismans: that copy of The Foucault Reader, with the master’s bald head and piercing eyes emblematic of pure intellection; A Thousand Plateaus with its Escher-lite line-drawing promising the thrills of disorientation; the stark, sickly-gray spine of Adorno’s Negative Dialectics; a stack of little Semiotext(e) volumes bought over time from the now-defunct video rental place. Maybe they still carry a faint whiff of rebellion or awakening, or (at least) late-adolescent disaffection. Maybe they evoke shame (for having lost touch with them, or having never really read them); maybe they evoke disdain (for their preciousness, or their inability to solve tedious adult dilemmas); maybe they’re mute. But chances are that, of those studies, they are what remain. “What on earth have you got in that backpack?”

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