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Structured Procrastination

Structured Procrastination
Author practices jumping rope with seaweed while work awaits. ``. . . anyone can do any amount of work, provided it isn't the work he is supposed to be doing at that moment." -- Robert Benchley, in Chips off the Old Benchley, 1949 I have been intending to write this essay for months. Why am I finally doing it? Because I finally found some uncommitted time? Wrong.

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I Heart Intelligence Sapiosexuality: Why Some of Us are Attracted Purely by Intelligence (backed by science, of course) A sapiosexual is defined as: “One who finds intelligence the most sexually attractive feature,” and they are way more common than you’d think. Intelligence truly is sexy, and there is a scientific basis to why. According to Diana Rabb, a Ph.D. in transpersonal psychology: “The brain is the largest sex organ. Those who admit to being sapiosexual will say that they are turned on by the brain and tend to be teased or excited by the insights of another person. As foreplay, the sapiosexual person may crave philosophical, political or psychological discussions because this turns [him or her] on.”

The Common Pattern To Procrastination ​​“Think of all the years passed by in which you said to yourself “I’ll do it tomorrow,” and how the gods have again and again granted you periods of grace of which you have not availed yourself. It is time to realize that you are a member of the Universe, that you are born of Nature itself, and to know that a limit has been set to your time.” — Marcus Aurelius If you procrastinate, you’re in good company. To-Do Lists and The Structured Procrastinator Many procrastinators use to-do lists. And indeed they can be useful. But what exactly are to-do lists for? The structured procrastinator will have in his mind, or perhaps written down somewhere, a priority list; the things he needs to do, at some time or other. The seemingly important tasks will be at the top, motivating him to do tasks further down the list as a way of procrastinating.

Start Thinking NOW About How You Will Rock 2011! It’s a little scary for me to think that there are a mere 3 weeks left in 2010. One question: Where did the year go? January 1st seems to sneak up on us every year, and every year we madly try to figure out what our resolutions will be and what we’re going to accomplish in the coming year. Wouldn’t it be nice to just hit the ground running? How to draw “To DO” lists as a PhD Student As a PhD student half way through the hustle and bustle of postgraduate matters, I can tell I have been through a steep learning curve. I have been constantly exploring and shifting my working habits to find a better way of dealing with the reading, writing and researching demands. Yes, you might have guessed already that I’m a bit of the procrastinating type (at times). But unfortunately, this is not all, as I can also be the workaholic when I get all the inspiration in the world flowing into my brain. These are happy times, then I can write effortlessly and I have time to accomplish all my goals. It’s an interesting one, mostly because doing a PhD is a process, writing is a process, reading is a process, researching is a process.

Gaslighting The term owes its origin to the play Gas Light and its film adaptations, after which it was coined popularly. The term has been used in clinical and research literature.[3][4] Etymology[edit] Clinical examples[edit] Sociopaths frequently use gaslighting tactics. Sociopaths consistently transgress social mores, break laws, and exploit others, but typically, are also charming and convincing liars who consistently deny wrongdoing.

Self-Imposed Deadlines Don't Stop Procrastination. Here's What Might. Mark Twain advised people never to put off until tomorrow what they can put off until the day after, and a lot of us listen. Estimates suggest that 15% to 20% of all people are chronic procrastinators, and that share goes up for situational delay: As one example, four in five people put off retirement savings despite knowing better. Then there are the innumerable office procrastinators, many identifiable by the mere fact that they're reading this article.

Marginalia, the Anti-Library, and Other Ways to Master the Lost Art of Reading Warren Buffett is undoubtedly considered one of the greatest investors of all times. His empire, Berkshire Hathaway, is worth $355 billion, an increase of 1,826,163 percent since 1964 when Buffett took over. He owns (or owns big chunks) of some of the biggest brands in the world including GEICO, Dairy Queen, NetJets, half of Heinz, and significant holdings in companies such as American Express, IBM, and Wells Fargo. But Buffett’s very best investment—responsible for literally billions of dollars in profits over the years—was very cheap. Because it was a book. That’s right, a book.

Minimal ZTD: The Simplest System Possible Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. Recently I posted my new twist on the excellent GTD system, Zen To Done (ZTD): The Ultimate Simple Productivity System. However, reader Mark Siegal said that the system seems to complex. Gaslighting: Psychological Manipulation to the Extreme There are different unofficial terms for psychological attacks and abuse that people may suffer. Gang stalking has already been introduced in one of my earlier articles as a group of people in a community who target an individual with the end goal of breaking that individual down in a covert operation (mainly psychological, causing the person to think he or she is going crazy in some cases). This can be real or possibly a delusion of the individual, especially if that person has schizophrenia. Gaslighting is another form of psychological abuse, and there are actually more online and text resources than for gang stalking.

4 Habits Of Punctual People Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late. A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don't value others' time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor. "Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking," she says.

6 Apps That Block Online Distractions So You Can Get Work Done Perhaps sensing a shift in the zeitgeist, The New York Times has run no less than three stories over the past week about unplugging from the Internet. In the most widely read, Pico Iyer's "The Joy of Quiet," the author posits the idea that solitude is the new luxury. Getting away from your PC, your phone and your iPad, Iyer argues, will allow you to get absorbed in a book, a conversation or a piece of music and bring you joy. Develop Routines At Home If you’re trying to do anything productively a system, and at some stage a routine, should be set. This is important for everything working from home or elsewhere. When you’re home all day and don’t have routines in place your day may become a shamble with nothing getting done properly. Likewise, if you return home after work to a list of jobs and no order or routine, it may be difficult to even get started. Unclutterer has some examples for different job routines around the house that will make life easier. Deep Cleaning — The best way that I’ve found to tackle cleaning is to give each room a day of the week (Monday is living room, Tuesday is family room, Wednesday is bedroom, Thursday is bathrooms, Friday is kitchen, etc.).

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