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Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain - George Lakoff

Idea Framing, Metaphors, and Your Brain - George Lakoff
Related:  Brain Training and HabitsLinguistics

The Daily Routines Of Famous Creatives - Entertainment If imitation is sincerest form of flattery, replicating an individual's daily routine must sit somewhere further along the sinister end of the spectrum. Still, if it helps us strike on mimicking the creative capacities of these artists, writers and musicians, we're all for it. Compiled by the productivity-enhancing minds of Podio, this interactive infographic gives extensive details on the daily routines of 26 creative legends. Looking to write the next classic? Any budding musicians might find their most productive hours follow a similar pattern to Mozart, whose late night sessions gave birth to some of the most famous music ever penned - but then Beethoven was more of a midday worker. Do let us know if you find any of the routines fruitful. Click on the image to view the interactive version Click image to see the interactive version (via Podio). (Images: Rex; Shutterstock; Podio) Tags: entertainment, literature, music

Keith Chen: language that forecasts weather — and behavior By Keith Chen How are China, Estonia and Germany different from India, Greece and the UK? To an economist, one answer is obvious: savings rates. Germans save 10 percentage points more than the British do (as a fraction of GDP), while Estonians and Chinese save a whopping 20 percentage points more than Greeks and Indians. Economists think a lot about what drives people to save, but many of these international differences remain unexplained. In a recent paper of mine, I find that these countries differ not only in how much their residents save for the future, but also how their native speakers talk about the future. Keith Chen: Could your language affect your ability to save money? In late 2011, an idea struck me while reading several papers in psychology that link a person’s language with differences in how they think about space, color, and movement. In a nutshell, this is precisely what I found. Rain is likely this weekend. It will likely rain this weekend. What does this mean?

Maslow's hierarchy of needs Maslow's hierarchy of needs, represented as a pyramid with the more basic needs at the bottom[1] Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review.[2] Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow studied what he called exemplary people such as Albert Einstein, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Frederick Douglass rather than mentally ill or neurotic people, writing that "the study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy Hierarchy The most fundamental and basic four layers of the pyramid contain what Maslow called "deficiency needs" or "d-needs": esteem, friendship and love, security, and physical needs. Esteem

8 tips to make your life more surprising — from a “Surprisologist” A closeup of Tania Luna, with glow stick. Photo: James Duncan Davidson In today’s talk, Tania Luna shares her experience of immigrating to the United States from Ukraine as a little girl. Commit to the mindset and process of surprise. Luna believes we can all be surprisologists. Tania Luna leads a TED audience in a glowstick dance, during a talk given a year prior to the one posted today. 5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think Keith Chen (TED Talk: Could your language affect your ability to save money?) might be an economist, but he wants to talk about language. For instance, he points out, in Chinese, saying “this is my uncle” is not as straightforward as you might think. In Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. “All of this information is obligatory. This got Chen wondering: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages” like Chinese use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. But that’s only the beginning. Featured illustration via iStock.

7 Deadly Sins of Creativity Email Creativity is not just for artists and poets. Everybody has the potential to exercise their creative mind – to innovate new ways of accomplishing things that will ultimately make life easier and more gratifying. Creativity magnifies the effectiveness of our natural talents, generating elevated levels of success and happiness by helping us discover more efficient ways to do what we love to do. Happiness is not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort. - Franklin D. Roosevelt Acts of creativity can be found in every facet of life. Now, it’s to be expected that there will be ups and downs in our levels of creativity. 1. Knowledge and attention are absolute necessities. The first steps the brain takes when tackling a creative venture are actually governed by logic, not creativity. 2. Enthusiasm is the lifeblood of creativity. 3. 4. If you hope to exercise your creativity, you must get over your fear of failure. 5. 6. 7.

Daniel Everett: Endangered Languages Good evening, I am Laura Welcher from The Long Now Foundation. I am the director of the Rosetta Project. Some of you may know, this summer, we finished our first prototype Rosetta disk, after 8 years of work, and so now five copies of that disk are out there in the world, that is to the very long-term archive of the Rosetta Project as you know is a collection of the world’s languages. When we made that available over the past several years, we have had many, many request for a version that would not cost $25,000 and that we could distribute it very widely. So, I am very pleased to announce that we have now made a version that can be distributed very widely, and this is a digital fully browsable version of the disk which is available now on DVD and today we have made it available at the Rosetta Project website for anybody to go and interact with.

Artist Takes Every Drug Known to Man, Draws Self Portraits After Each Use This is all kinds of cool, and everything your mother told you not to do. Bryan Lewis Saunders is an artist from Washington D.C., not just any artist though. Saunders prefers to take a more unconventional approach to his artwork. Arguably his most interesting project, entitled DRUGS is described as follows: Below, you can view a collection of portraits Saunders drew while under the influence of various substances ranging from cocaine, to marijuana, to DMT. Abilify / Xanax / Ativan 90mg Abilify 1 sm Glass of “real” Absinth 10mg Adderall 10mg Ambien Bath Salts 15mg Buspar (snorted) 4 Butalbitals Butane Honey Oil 250mg Cephalexin 1/2 gram Cocaine Computer Duster (2 squirts) 2 bottles of Cough Syrup 1 “Bump” of Crystalmeth 4mg Dilaudid 1 shot of Dilaudid / 3 shots of Morphine 60mg Geodon Hash Huffing Gas Huffing Lighter Fluid 7.5mg Hydrocodone / 7.5mg Oxycodone / 3mg Xanax 3mg Klonopin 10mg Loritab Marijuana (Kine Bud) G13 Marijuana Morphine IV Psilocybin Mushrooms (2 caps onset) 2mg Nicotine Gum Nitrous Oxide 2mg Xanax

No Idea Left Behind: 25 Tools for Capturing Ideas Anywhere As a serial entrepreneur, I’m addicted to ideas. I feed off of ’em. And nothing makes me more upset than having a great idea… and losing it. Ideas never happen at opportune times, and having the proper idea capture tools can make sure that you’ll capture all your ideas for later processing. The problem with ideas is that they’re situational. In order to capture every single little idea that we have, we’ll need to take a multi-pronged approach to capturing the little bits of genius that we have throughout our day. I should note that we’re not talking about complex systems like mind mapping and other GTD systems. Analog Idea Capture Analog idea capturing is the oldest and one of the most useful forms of idea capture. Hipster PDA. Pocket Briefcase. Moleskine. Rite in the Rain notepad Rite in the Rain. Write boards. Sticky notes. Mac Software Mac users pride themselves on the amount and quality of organization and productivity apps. Quicksilver appending to text file. Quicksilver. OmniFocus.

The Art of Looking: What 11 Experts Teach Us about Seeing Our Familiar City Block with New Eyes by Maria Popova “Attention is an intentional, unapologetic discriminator. It asks what is relevant right now, and gears us up to notice only that.” “How we spend our days,” Annie Dillard wrote in her timelessly beautiful meditation on presence over productivity, “is, of course, how we spend our lives.” Horowitz begins by pointing our attention to the incompleteness of our experience of what we conveniently call “reality”: Right now, you are missing the vast majority of what is happening around you. This adaptive ignorance, she argues, is there for a reason — we celebrate it as “concentration” and welcome its way of easing our cognitive overload by allowing us to conserve our precious mental resources only for the stimuli of immediate and vital importance, and to dismiss or entirely miss all else. Minor clashes between my dog’s preferences as to where and how a walk should proceed and my own indicated that I was experiencing almost an entirely different block than my dog.

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