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Study Smarter, Not Harder

Study Smarter, Not Harder
Good students don't just study harder, they study smarter. A study published this week identifies some habits of successful college students. I'll describe the new study shortly, but first: How should students study ? A growing body of cognitive psychology research emphasizes the value of two principles: Principle one is space your studying out over time . If you study something and then study it again right away, it's fresh in your mind the second time. Principle two is test yourself . Ironically, students often rate spacing and testing as counterproductive. According to the study that came out this week , the good ones do. In summary, low performers were especially likely to base their study decisions on impending deadlines rather than planning, and they were also more likely to engage in late-night studying. Why spacing wasn't significantly related to GPA isn't clear. It's always important to remember that correlation doesn't equal causation.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/everybody-is-stupid-except-you/201201/study-smarter-not-harder

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Bjork Learning and Forgetting Lab - Research Applying Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Educational Practice The primary goal of this research, which is funded by the James S. McDonnell foundation, is to promote learning and memory performance within educational contexts through the investigation of principles in cognitive psychology. Studies address issues of transfer-appropriate and material-appropriate processing between encoding and retrieval. Applying tests in order to enhance learning and determining the desirable amount and timing of feedback regarding an individual's memory performance are methods that are currently under investigation.

Reading Strategies - Learning Skills from MindTools Reading Efficiently by Reading Intelligently Get the most from your reading. © iStockphoto/mammamaart Whether they're project documents, trade journals, blogs, business books or ebooks, most of us read regularly as part of our jobs, and to develop our skills and knowledge. But do you ever read what should be a useful document, yet fail to gain any helpful information from it? Or, do you have to re-read something several times to get a full understanding of the content? Smarts: Four things worth learning about learning {*style:<b>Read. Recall. Write. We're Only Human...: The Science of Cramming I went to a very nerdy college. This school was so nerdy that the “mascot” was an engineer, and at football games students would chant: “Tangent, secant, cosine, sine. Three point one four one five nine. Go Engineers!” I'm not kidding. So how is it possible that today I do not even know what a secant is?

Why Forgetting Is Key To Remembering Forgetting isn’t usually thought of in relation to learning, but as it turns out, it might play a role. Herman Ebbinghaus, a German experimental psychologist from the late 19th and early 20th century, was (seemingly) curious about the way people remembered. (And thus forgot.) What made our good man Herman unique though was in his method of study–or rather his focus group. That is, himself. Introduction to accelerated learning: 3. Review and recall Learning cannot take place without memory, and we expect our students to be able to process, synthesise and recall a vast amount of information every day. There are, however, some simple strategies that we can employ to help them to do this. Firstly consider the natural concentration span. A rough guide is that concentration span in minutes is equivalent to chronological age in years, +/− 2 minutes.

Simple Ways To Study Better Knowledge is the essence of smart thinking. No matter how much raw intelligence you have, you are not going to succeed at solving complex problems without knowing a lot. That's why we spend the first 20 (or more) years of our lives in school. Robert Bjork and fellow PT blogger Nate Kornell have explored some of the study habits of college students in a 2007 paper in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review . Research on memory provides a number of important suggestions about the most effective ways to study.

Making It Stick: Memorable Strategies to Enhance Learning By: Regina G. Richards Think about how you remember something: When you want to remember a phone number, do you repeat it to yourself several times until you get the whole number dialed? 10 Tips to Study Smart and Save Time I recently got my marks back from University. My grade point average was a 4.2 out of a possible 4.5, resting between an A and a perfect A+. In itself, this isn’t an incredible achievement. But I managed to do this while spending only a fraction of the time studying than many of the people I knew. Is it just natural talent?

Study skills Study skills or study strategies are approaches applied to learning. They are generally critical to success in school,[1] considered essential for acquiring good grades, and useful for learning throughout one's life. There are an array of study skills, which may tackle the process of organizing and taking in new information, retaining information, or dealing with assessments. They include mnemonics, which aid the retention of lists of information, effective reading, and concentration techniques,[2] as well as efficient notetaking.[3][dead link] While often left up to the student and their support network, study skills are increasingly taught in High School and at the University level.

Why Students Cheat on Tests On Wednesday, June 13, Nayeem ­Ahsan walked into a fourth-floor classroom at Stuyvesant High School with some two dozen other students to take a physics test—one of a number of Regents Exams that many New York State high-school juniors are required to take. Small and skinny with thick black hair and a bright, shy smile, Nayeem is 16. Like many ­teenage boys, he seems to straddle two worlds: One moment you see a man, ­another a boy. The son of Bangladeshi immigrants, Nayeem was born in Flushing Hospital and raised in Jackson Heights, a 35-­minute subway ride to Stuyvesant in lower Manhattan.

5 Education Hacks - How To Refuel Your Brain Without Any Excuses ← LMLRN How To Get A Degree Education, Learn A New Language, Teach Your Children Calculus, and Read Thousands of Books for Free Long gone are the days of Encarta Thesaurus and the Encyclopedia Britannica. Wikipedia has all but obliterated the need for a hard copy of any information. The Internet has changed the face of education and the new generation are going through school with an unprecedented amount of information at their fingertips.

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