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Technology, libraries, and schools

Technology, libraries, and schools

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What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like? At a time when public libraries are starting to offer everything from community gardening plots to opportunities to check out humans for conversations, some school libraries are similarly re-evaluating their roles and expanding their offerings. Case in point: Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Virginia. When librarian Joan Ackroyd arrived there four years ago, she found an environment very different from the “engaging, creative, fun” elementary and middle school libraries to which she was accustomed. “Its library was none of those things,” she recalls. “It was a traditional, quiet research space.” Ackroyd decided this wasn’t optimal. Two Very Good Book Search Engines for Teachers May 11, 2015 In today’s post we are sharing with you two good platforms where you can search for and find online free and premium books. As for Free Book Search tool listed below , this is a specific search engine designed to help you find free ebooks, audiobooks, and Kindle books. This tool is also integrated with Google Drive allowing you to conduct your book search right in your Drive.

Manifesto for 21st Century Teacher Librarians Editor’s Note: This article was originally published as a Tag Team Tech column on www.voyamagazine.com. It has been reprinted and reproduced numerous times and in many places. We are making it available here to ensure that all of our readers have seen it. Manifesto for 21st Century Teacher Librarians By Joyce Kasman Valenza Some Rules We Need to Break In Our Reading Classrooms We seem to be run by the rules of what came before us. We seem to be trying to uphold traditions that were started all in the spirit of becoming better reading teachers. And yet, I think it is time for us to break some rules, to become reading warriors, and to speak up and say no; this is not what reading will look like in our classroom. This is not the reading experience that my students will have, this is not what will make students fall in love with reading. So I present you with some rules that seem to perpetuate much of our reading instruction and encourage you to break them just like I have and so many others before me. Rule number 1: You must read X number of pages before you abandon a book.

School libraries face a bleak future as leaders try to balance the books I remember my school library: it had two floors with spiral staircases, individual study cubicles and a classroom on the upper floor. It was attached to the sixth form block, giving the students easy access to a study facility. One particular memory is of a Puffin Books sale – I could even tell you the books I bought (and still have). This was in the days before personal computing so the only source of information – apart from other people, TV or radio – was books. There was something tactile about walking up to a shelf, looking along the spines and selecting a book which you hoped would answer the question posed in your homework or choosing a work of fiction by reading the blurb on the back. Going Retro: Reading Apps for Real Books Reading Rainbow app YouTube clips. Texting.

White Ravens Each year the language specialists (Lektoren) at the International Youth Library (IYL), in Munich, Germany, select newly published books from around the world that they consider to be especially noteworthy. This list of books is compiled into the annual White Ravens Catalogue, which is introduced each year at the Bologna (Italy) Children's Book Fair. The White Ravens Online Catalogue, which includes all titles from 1993 through 2007, was created by ICDL researchers in collaboration with the IYL and is available on the ICDL web site with the permission of the International Youth Library.

Getting to E: The State of the School Ebook Market Illustration by Ken Orvidas. By fits and starts, school libraries are moving toward ebook adoption; the question is how fast. While publishers and distributors are evolving their offerings to appeal to students and educators, the transition to ebooks has its challenges, ranging from inadequate technology to some students’ preference for print books. Still, the movement is definitively toward e, as an anticipated $30-million deal for e-materials between Amazon and the New York City Department of Education shows. OverDrive, a leading distributor of ebooks to schools and libraries, saw its highest-ever single day of checkouts—more than 500,000 ebooks—in June, according to David Burleigh, the company’s director of marketing. Nationally, school librarians report that the mean portion of their materials budgets spent on ebooks is 7.2 percent; five years from now, it will be 12.4 percent, according to respondents to SLJ’s School Library Ebook Survey.

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