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The Digital Shift - On Libraries and New Media, powered by Library Journal and School Library Journal

The Digital Shift - On Libraries and New Media, powered by Library Journal and School Library Journal
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Digital Is The Unquiet Librarian University of Bergen Library The University of Bergen, including the University Library, has launched a new website with a new design. The "old" web pages will still be available for a limited period, but they will not be updated any more. Welcome to the library! Main objective of the library The main objective of the University library is to collect and make available information in order to contribute to improving the quality of the research, teaching and dissemination of knowledge that takes place at the University of Bergen. The University Library offers * Books, journals, pictures, maps, and manuscripts * Access to electronic resources: information databases, e-books, e-journals, etc. * Assistance in finding relevant information * Courses/instruction in how to use the library's collections and services * Learning resource centres with workstations with computers and AV equipment, and with network for connecting your own PC. More about the library

Empowering Learners: Skip to main content ALA User Menu A Division of the American Library Association You are at: ALA.org » AASL » Learning Standards & Program Guidelines » Empowering Learners: Share this page: Share on Facebook Share on Google+ Share on Pinterest Print Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs School library programs continue to undergo momentous changes that have heightened the importance of technology and evidence-based learning. Empowering Learners advances school library programs to meet the needs of the changing school library environment and is guided by the Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action. An exemplary school library meets all of the guidelines areas in this broad, general outline. Ordering Order online at the ALA store or call call 1-866-SHOP ALA (1-866-746-7252) or 1-312-944-6780. *This publication complements the Standards for the 21st-Century Learner and Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action .

Libraries are trusted spaces, but this doesn't mean they have to stay the same | Guardian Professional | The Guardian Libraries are treasured by local people, and any changes to the service can be highly controversial. However, councils face tough financial challenges, forcing a fundamental look at all services. To make changes in a way that is sustainable requires careful planning, and while each council's story is different there are some important points to share. Councils should take a hard look at the existing service, map out the full extent of what the library service provides and shouldn't assume everyone knows. It is up the local authority involved to develop a deep understanding of who in the community needs the service and what, if any, options they might have. Also, library users like everyone else are now consuming written information in different ways. Councils should use the Equalities' Act 2010's requirements as well as the Public Libraries Duty to guide them through any changes to their library service. • Approaching other councils to explore the service as a joint venture.

Boston Public Library K12 Digital Citizenship - For teachers Workshop about instruction about digital citizenship: Workshop (heavy on case law): Standards: CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS WITH HIGHLIGHTED DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP STANDARDS (yellow highlights are direct standards; green highlights are related standards): The model School Library standards are linked to the Common Core standards: and are highlighted in terms of digital literacy: Websites for Teachers (also see the Resources page of this wiki): Teacher websites about digital citizenship: I Have A [Library Technology] Dream | Finding Heroes Last Friday I facilitated a workshop hosted by Catalyst where the topic of the day was: if you had no budgetary or political restraints, what would the library technology suite of your dreams look like? What would it do for you and your community, now and in the future? The participants dreamed big, bold and beautiful leaving with a whole raft of possibilities some of which can be found in the storified tweets. Technology is of course pretty useless without confident and capable people to harness the opportunities it offers. I have a dream of what could be if we encouraged confident and capable people to develop and share library technology I have a dream that one day all community members will have a level of literacy that enables them to create and learn not simply survive. I have a dream that one day we will relinquish the idealistic inclination to become experts in everything and instead partner with skilled community members to create knowledge and learning opportunities. Like this:

NSWPLA | NSW Public Libraries Association K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum All students need digital citizenship skills to participate fully in their communities and make smart choices online and in life. Our award-winning K–12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum: Addresses top concerns for schools.Prepares students with critical 21st-century skills.Supports educators with training and recognition.Engages the whole community through family outreach. All students need digital citizenship skills to participate fully in their communities and make smart choices online and in life. Our award-winning K–12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum: Addresses top concerns for schools.Prepares students with critical 21st-century skills.Supports educators with training and recognition.Engages the whole community through family outreach.

Snapchat For Your Library | Librarian Enumerations Snapchat has been getting a lot of buzz as of late (Facebook offered to purchase it for $3 billion, but was turned down). It is currently valued at about $4 billion, and I think it will be the social media application of 2014 (here’s an interesting story of why teens use Snapchat by npr). What is Snapchat? Snapchat is a photo chat application developed by Stanford University student Evan Spiegel. What makes it different from Google chat, FB messaging, etc is the fact that the “snaps” (photos/videos/text) that you send are only viewable between 1-10 seconds, and then deleted permanently. It is known as the “next wave of private social sharing” (USA Today). Who Uses Snapchat? All Things D’s Liz Gannes reports that Snapchat is used by kids between the ages of “13-25 years old, with a growing contingent that’s aged 40 and over.” How Can Libraries Use Snapchat? Taking direction from the brands listed in Mashable’s article here are a few ideas I have: **Update: **2nd Update: **3rd Update **4th Update

World Public Library TheInnovativeEducator - TIE's Tech Assessments I have put together just a few tech assessments that you may find helpful. If you have any additional assessments please post to the discussion tab here or if you want to comment on some of these assessments please comment here.Tech Literacy Assessment - What Should You Measure? from Ed Week's Digital DirectionsIntegrating Technology in Multiple Intelligences - Ideas for Integrating Technology into Learning to Address Multiple IntelligencesSpecial Report on Authentic Assessment - From EdutopiaAssessment Articles - From EdutopiaSchool Visit Report: This document can be used to look at a school through the lens of a leader, coach, teacher, online support, and tech support. Atomic Learning Website: The Atomic Learning Framework identifies 25 “essential digital literacy elements. BOCES Tech Literacy Assessment Evidence of Quality Teaching with Tech Interactive Inc. Key Stage 3 ICT Assessment Tasks Learning Point Associates

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming It’s important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members’ interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I’m going to tell you that libraries are important. And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I’m an author, often an author of fiction. So I’m biased as a writer. And I’m here giving this talk tonight, under the auspices of the Reading Agency: a charity whose mission is to give everyone an equal chance in life by helping people become confident and enthusiastic readers. And it’s that change, and that act of reading that I’m here to talk about tonight. I was once in New York, and I listened to a talk about the building of private prisons – a huge growth industry in America. It’s not one to one: you can’t say that a literate society has no criminality. And I think some of those correlations, the simplest, come from something very simple. Fiction has two uses. It’s tosh.

The Digital Shift is the new home for all technology-related stories and features published by Library Journal and School Library Journal. They cover everything to keep librarians informed as they help ease patrons’ and students’ immersion in an increasingly digital world by providing the latest in online tools and resources that will help patrons and students work and learn most efficiently. by evaldes Mar 29

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