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How To Become A Hacker

How To Become A Hacker
Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". Back in 1996 I noticed that there didn't seem to be any other FAQs or web documents that addressed this vital question, so I started this one. A lot of hackers now consider it definitive, and I suppose that means it is. Still, I don't claim to be the exclusive authority on this topic; if you don't like what you read here, write your own. If you are reading a snapshot of this document offline, the current version lives at Note: there is a list of Frequently Asked Questions at the end of this document. Numerous translations of this document are available: ArabicBelorussianChinese, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, FrenchGerman, GreekItalianHebrew, Japanese, Lithuanian, Norwegian, PersianPortuguese (Brazilian), RomanianSpanish, Turkish, and Swedish. 1.

http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html

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Hacker (programmer subculture) A team of hackers competing in the CTF competition at DEF CON 17 A hacker is an adherent of the subculture that originally emerged in academia in the 1960s, around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC)[1] and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.[2] A hacker is someone who loves to program or who enjoys playful cleverness, or a combination of the two.[3] The act of engaging in activities (such as programming or other media[4]) in a spirit of playfulness and exploration is termed hacking. Richard Stallman explains about hackers who program:

8 Things You Won't Believe Can Be Hacked If movies are to be believed, hackers are mostly kept busy fighting the man with CGI animations of smiley faces, or else dwelling in the darkest corners of their mothers' basements and doing purely nerdy stuff that never affects the real world. But neither assumption is true: Hacking does not look like a rad skateboarder busting a kickflip over an onyx tower, and hackers do gain access to things that can affect your daily life ... and sometimes, even end it. #8. Explode Your Genitals We think we have a pretty good idea of what hackers are capable of: stealing your personal information, crashing your computer, Rollerblading like a sonofabitch and making out with Angelina Jolie (back when she was hot, before her alien DNA kicked in and she started looking like a hawk-monster).

80+ Best Free Hacking Tutorials Learning to become hacker is not as easy as learning to become a software developer. I realized this when I started looking for learning resources for simple hacking people do. Even to start doing the simplest hack on own, a hacker requires to have in depth knowledge of multiple topics. Some people recommend minimum knowledge of few programming languages like C, Python, HTML with Unix operating system concepts and networking knowledge is required to start learning hacking techniques. Though knowing a lot of things is required, it is not really enough for you to be a competent and successful hacker.

DS Fanboy's (semi) ultimate homebrew guide by Alisha Karabinus on May 20th 2008 11:00AM Where there's a system, there's a community of hobbyist programmers willing to tear it down, build it back up, and make it better, and they've been doing it to the DS from nearly the moment the handheld hit shelves. As the necessary hardware has grown cheaper, easier to use, and more widely available (when not sold out), the DS homebrew community in turn has grown stronger, producing some applications that are so good, they rival (or better!) similar commercial products.

Hacking for Beginners One of the best things about computers is how dynamic they are. There is so much information about computers and it changes constantly. As a hacker, you are at the leading edge of changes to technology. This makes it a very exciting and interesting field of study and can even lead to some awesome job opportunities as a computer security expert.

Hacks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology A hack in progress in Lobby 7. Although the practice is unsanctioned by the university, and students have sometimes been arraigned on trespassing charges for hacking,[18][19][20] hacks have substantial significance to MIT's history and student culture. Student bloggers working for the MIT Admissions Office have often written about MIT hacks, including those occurring during Campus Preview Weekend (CPW), an event welcoming admitted prospective freshman students.[21] Alumni bloggers on the MIT Alumni Association website also report and document some of the more memorable hacks.[22] Since the mid-1970s, the student-written guide How To Get Around MIT (HowToGAMIT) has included a chapter on hacking, and discusses history, hacker groups, ethics, safety tips, and risks of the activity.[23] Cultural aspects[edit] Residents of MIT's Simmons Hall collaborated to make a smiley face on the building's facade, December 8, 2002. Famous hacks[edit]

How to surf anonymously without a trace Skip to comments. How to surf anonymously without a trace ComputerWorld ^ | 12 March 2007 | Preston Gralla Posted on Tue Mar 13 14:29:37 2007 by ShadowAce The punchline to an old cartoon is "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog," but these days, that's no longer true. It's easier than ever for the government, Web sites and private businesses to track exactly what you do online, know where you've visited, and build up comprehensive profiles about your likes, dislikes and private habits. Hacker ethic While some tenets of hacker ethic were described in other texts like Computer Lib/Dream Machines (1974) by Ted Nelson, Levy appears to have been the first to document both the philosophy and the founders of the philosophy. Levy explains that MIT housed an early IBM 704 computer inside the Electronic Accounting Machinery (EAM) room in 1959. This room became the staging grounds for early hackers, as MIT students from the Tech Model Railroad Club sneaked inside the EAM room after hours to attempt programming the 30-ton, 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) computer.

Top 15 Security/Hacking Tools & Utilities 1. Nmap I think everyone has heard of this one, recently evolved into the 4.x series. Nmap (“Network Mapper”) is a free open source utility for network exploration or security auditing. It was designed to rapidly scan large networks, although it works fine against single hosts. How to Crack the Account Password on Any Operating System This guest post was written by Blair Mathis from LaptopLogic.com – your premier source for the latest laptop software news and best laptop accessories. Computer passwords are like locks on doors – they keep honest people honest. If someone wishes to gain access to your laptop or computer, a simple login password will not stop them.

The Best Hacking Tutorial Sites - Learn Legal Hacking written by: Daniel Robson•edited by: Aaron R.•updated: 2/13/2011 Whether it's to understand potential attack vectors or simply for the fun of it, learning the basics of hacking is something that a lot of people aspire to. Untraceable Computer Techniques So I can imagine a time when (if it is not already happening) that posts to the internet such as this will be actively traced to the source computer and the poster put under scrutiny at the least or jailed at the most. First off there are not any sure proof untraceable techniques that the average man can employ, but there are somethings that we can do to make it harder for those who would want to track activity. What are some techniques that one might use to go online to continue to gather information in regards to survival preparedness, government actions and or communicating with others? Computer Registration - All computers are serial numbered and it is easy enough to also track the MAC addresses of the Network Interface Cards within the laptop or etc. Most people buy a laptop with their credit card so it does not take a rocket scientist to figure out who has what laptop.

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