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Nutrition Education, Free - Fun Healthy Kids' Games, Healthy Family Living Website, Food Pyramid Education, Healthy Eating Wellness Tools, Children's Nutrition Information, Free Kids' Games

Nutrition Education, Free - Fun Healthy Kids' Games, Healthy Family Living Website, Food Pyramid Education, Healthy Eating Wellness Tools, Children's Nutrition Information, Free Kids' Games

Weather Games for Kids - The Weather Channel Kids Video Watch today's top stories and most popular videos. Looking to watch incredible tornadoes? We've got that too. Maps Check out our interactive maps, which provide you with features like past/future radar and customizable layers. Local Weather Trust us to help you plan the best day possible, with the most accurate weather forecast available. Sheppard Software: Fun free online learning games and activities for kids. BrianMac Sports Coach Motivational and Inspirational Quotes iPad Curriculum 17 Free Tools for Creating Screen Capture Images and Videos When you're trying to teach people how to do something new on their computers having screencast videos or annotated screen capture images can be invaluable to you and the people you're trying to help. Here are some free tools that you can use to create screen capture videos and images. Vessenger, producers of a group messaging system, offers a free program for capturing and annotating images on your computer screen. Using the print screen key on your PC or "command+shift+4" on your Mac are easy ways to create a screen capture. Monosnap is a new, free screen capture tool for Mac and Windows. Szoter is a free online tool for annotating images that are stored on your computer. Explain and Send is a free Chrome extension that I have just installed in my browser. Pixlr offers a large set of image creation and editing tools. Screenr is a very simple, easy-to-use tool for creating screencast videos. Screen Castle is a simple screencast creation tool that is completely web-based.

7 Habits Of Highly-Effective Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post has been updated with an updated visual from Sylvia Duckworth, who took our graphic from alwaysprepped.com (now getalma) post and created the above visual. It is also sporting a new title, as the “habits of” is a trademarked term. As such, the new graphic and phrasing appears below. You can also see Sylvia’s tutorial on sketchnotes here. In most ways, teachers that use technology in the classroom aren’t much different than those that don’t. Any teacher worth their salt assesses, and then revises planned instruction based on data from those assessments. They manage their classroom in a way that works for them, create a positive learning environment, and (great teachers especially) collaborate with a variety of stakeholders to make sure every humanly possible attempt is made to meet all students need. 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Free iPad Apps to Teach Current Events My students use their iPads as creators every day, whether they are recording their thoughts, using virtual tools or publishing authentic assessments. Content can be both created and consumed using an iPad, and my students take on both roles. There are abundant resources for content consumption, and these apps can be used to teach current events. Many schools are increasing their use of informational and multimedia texts in order to align their instruction to the Common Core Learning Standards. It's important to acknowledge that current events are more than just articles in a newspaper. There are a variety of free iPad apps that students and teachers can use to access high-interest texts and video clips that will connect your classroom to the world. Watchup This app is in my top ten for personal use, and it has a clear place in your classroom. SnagFilms There are lots of ways to introduce current events into your classroom, and documentary films can be a powerful tool. NBC Nightly News

4 Stages: The Integration Of Technology In Learning The 4 Stages Of The Integration Of Technology In Learning by Terry Heick For professional development around this idea or others you read about on TeachThought, contact us. Technology can be used in the learning process in a variety of ways. Some are supplementary, serving the original design of the classroom and usually automate some previously by-human task or process–grading multiple choice assessments, searching for a source of information, or sharing messages and other data across large groups. But fully integrated and embedded in the learning process, technology can be transformative–and disruptive. Scaffolding the learning of anything unfamiliar–somehow–is a way of supporting the learner and setting them up for long-term independent success. Should elementary school be stage 1, middle school stage 2, and so on? Should all learners begin a school year at stage 1 and move as far as they can towards stage 4? Can a planned learning experience be evaluated using this framework in mind?

The Evolution of Classroom Technology Classrooms have come a long way. There’s been an exponential growth in educational technology advancement over the past few years. From overhead projectors to iPads, it’s important to understand not only what’s coming next but also where it all started. We’ve certainly come a long way but some things seem hauntingly similar to many years ago. For example, Thomas Edison said in 1925 that “books will soon be obsolete in schools. Also in 1925, there were “schools of the air” that delivered lessons to millions of students simultaneously. Here’s a brief look at the evolution of classroom technology. c. 1650 – The Horn-Book Wooden paddles with printed lessons were popular in the colonial era. c. 1850 – 1870 – Ferule This is a pointer and also a corporal punishment device. 1870 – Magic Lantern The precursor to a slide projector, the ‘magic lantern’ projected images printed on glass plates and showed them in darkened rooms to students. c. 1890 – School Slate c. 1890 – Chalkboard c. 1900 – Pencil B.

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