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7 Essential Books on Optimism

7 Essential Books on Optimism
by Maria Popova What the love of honey has to do with ancient wisdom, our capacity for hope, and the future of technology. Every once in a while, we all get burned out. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince, one of our must-read children’s books with philosophy for grown-ups, is among the most poetic and hopeful reflections on human existence ever penned. Here is my secret. Published in 1943, translated into 180 languages since and adapted to just about every medium, Exupéry’s famous novella is one of the best-selling books of all time. Martin Seligman is a Brain Pickings regular — known for his research on learned helplessness and revered as the father of positive psychology, his Authentic Happiness is one of the 7 most essential books on the art and science of happiness, and his Flourish made our 2011 Summer Reading List. As you read this book, you will see that there is an epidemic of depression among young adults and among children in the United States today. Full review here. Related:  Entertainmentbrainpickingslife coaching

Creative Cartography: 7 Must-Read Books about Maps by Maria Popova From tattoos to Thomas More’s Utopia, or what Moby Dick has to do with the nature of time. We’re obsessed with maps — a fundamental sensemaking mechanism for the world, arguably the earliest form of standardized information design, and a relentless source of visual creativity. Today, we turn to seven fantastic books that explore the art and science of cartography from seven fascinating angles. Map As Art, The: Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography is the definitive overview of today’s bravest, boldest creative cartography, featuring 360 colorful creations by well-known artists and emerging visual experimenteurs alike, including Brain Pickings favorites Maira Kalman, Paula Scher and Olaful Eliasson. Matthew Cusick, 'Fiona’s Wave,' 2005 Cusick's oversized collages are painted with fragments of vintage atlases and school geography books from the golden era of cartography, 1872-1945. Qin Ga, 'Site 22: Mao Zedong Temple,' 2005 We reviewed it in full here. Donating = Loving

Big thinkers answer little kids' innocent and profound questions about life, the best biographies, memoirs, and history books of 2013, and more Hey you! If you missed last week's edition – Anne Lamott on writing and how perfectionism kills creativity, the best illustrations from 150 years of Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales, cultivating a suicide-proof culture, and more – you can catch up here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting with a modest donation. Does My Goldfish Know Who I Am? In 2012, I wrote about a lovely book titled Big Questions from Little People & Simple Answers from Great Minds, in which some of today's greatest scientists, writers, and philosophers answer kids' most urgent questions, deceptively simple yet profound. The questions range from what the purpose of science is to why onions make us cry to whether spiders can speak to why we blink when we sneeze. It’s normal to cry when you feel upset and until the age of twelve boys cry just as often as girls. (For a deeper dive into the biological mystery of crying, see the science of sobbing and emotional tearing.)

Built to Last: The Illustrated Secrets of Mankind's Greatest Structures by Maria Popova What gargoyles and mosques have to do with King Edward I and the secrets of Ancient Rome. Castles. Cathedrals. A reference model for the ribs of the vaulting on the roof truss Laying out the drawing of the roof trusses A quick reference model for the roof trusses An early sketch of the flying buttresses and one gargoyle Sketch for the kitchen scene while making dinner fit for a king Macaulay modeling for the drawing of King Edward I. Whether the three building types in this book were built to last or simply to impress, they were certainly constructed with determination and care. Combining rigorous research, poetic illustration and the captivating human stories behind these architectural marvels, Built to Last is equal parts illuminating and inspirational, brimming with a kind of visceral curiosity that makes Macaulay’s timeless drawings spring to life. Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. Share on Tumblr

The Mindset Maven | Find my purpose | Goals and goal setting | Forgiveness and healing | Self esteem confidence | PJ McClure – How to find happiness and success in life — Find my purpose | Goals and goal setting | Forgiveness and healing | Self esteem con Top 10 Deadliest Airline Disasters Technology Airplane accidents somehow attract the public’s attention with their drama and destruction. No car crash could ever seem so fascinating, terrifying or deadly, as many of them as happens every day. This is a list of the ten deadliest airplane accidents, or at least disasters most likely caused by accident. Excluded are Pan Am Flight 103 (270 fatalities, 0 survivors) and Air India Flight 182 (329 fatalities, 0 survivors), both caused by bombs, and the World Trade Center disaster (2753 fatalities shared between two planes), due to hijacking. For those of you with a fear of flying, it is worth noting that seven of these ten items (bonus excluded) occurred in the ’70s and ’80s, and two of the three more recent accidents occurred in countries that people would think twice about visiting. Korean Airlines Flight 007 Location: Near Moneron Island, Soviet Union Fatalities: 269 Survivors: 0 American Airlines Flight 191 Iran Air Flight 655 Location: Persian Gulf Fatalities: 290 Survivors: 0

7 Must-Read Books on the Art & Science of Happiness by Maria Popova From Plato to Buddha, or what imperfection has to do with the neuroscience of the good life. If you, like me, are fascinated by the human quest to understand the underpinnings of happiness but break out in hives at the mere mention of self-help books, you’re in luck: I’ve sifted through my personal library, a decade’s worth of obsessive reading, to surface seven essential books on the art and science of happiness, rooted in solid science, contemporary philosophy and cross-disciplinary insight. From psychology and neuroscience to sociology and cultural anthropology to behavioral economics, these essential reads illuminate the most fundamental aspiration of all human existence: How to avoid suffering and foster lasting well-being. The question of what makes us happy is likely as old as human cognition itself and has occupied the minds of philosophers, prophets and scientists for millennia. Human rationality depends critically on sophisticated emotionality. Donating = Loving

21 Most Beautiful Nature Photos On Stumbleupon These are the 21 most beautiful nature photos on Stumbleupon. Stumbleupon is big society where you can spend all your day and all you life with smile on your face. On that site you can find lots of things, like photos, animals, home stuff and many more, nature photos like these one below. These nature photos are really beautiful and very amazing and that is the proof just how much our Earth is beautiful place. Ordering the Heavens: A Visual History of Mapping the Universe by Maria Popova From Copernicus to Ancient Korea, or what the Chinese concept of change has to do with Aztec astrology. The love of maps is a running theme here at Brain Pickings, from these 7 must-read books on creative cartography to, most recently, BBC’s fantastic documentary on important medieval maps. Humanity’s long history of visual sensemaking is as much a source of timeless inspiration as a living record of how our collective understanding of the universe and our place in it evolved. It seems like the farther from the known mapmakers’ imaginations traveled, the more fascinating their maps became. The Emperor's Astronomy Petrus Apianus. The 'Emperor's Astronomy'(dedicated to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V) elegantly depicts the cosmos and heavens according to the 1400-year-old Ptolemaic system, which maintained that the sun revolved around the earth. Popular Sixteenth-Century Scientific Work Petrus Apianus and Gemma Frisius. A Heliocentric Cosmos Nicolaus Copernicus.

Julie Mitchell's CoachNotes Nerd Paradise Posted on: 10 Cado 7:0 - 5.27.29 So you've procrastinated again. You told yourself you wouldn't do this 2 months ago when your professor assigned you this. But you procrastinated anyway. Shame on you. Pick a Topic The more "legally-oriented" your topic is, the better. Make a list ...of every possible outcome that this issue could cause in...the near future...the far future...of every person that this topic affects....of any instances where this topic has come in the news....what you would do about this topic if you had the chance/power/enough-sugar...any little detail you can think ofThe important thing about this is to think of ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING, no matter how silly or far-fetched. Reorder everything Put your most obvious argument first. Then put weird off the wall stuff, regardless of importance. Put the strongest argument for your case next. Now list the incidents that will help argue for your point. It's best to keep all this in the form of an outline. Spaces Now print it out. Write

(Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Culture in 10 Books by Maria Popova What the limits of the universe have to do with the history of jazz and the secret of happiness. Last week, I was reorganizing my library and realized that some of my favorite books are ones that introduced me to subjects I either admired but knew little about or was unaware of altogether. The kinds of reads that profoundly enrich one’s lens on the world. So I thought I’d put together a modest reading list of essential primers for, well, everything. Okay, maybe not everything — I’m keenly aware of how laughable that proposition is — but a fair amount to offer a basis for the kind of cross-disciplinary understanding of culture that I believe is crucial to contributing to the world in a meaningful way. Images courtesy of insect54 The idea of a ragtime ballet or opera must have seemed an oxymoron to those on both sides of the great racial divide that characterized turn-of-the-century American society. Popular films are a special kind of drama. Share on Tumblr

movies and tv shows you should watch before you die - a list by Chris1660 Spomenik: Retrofuturistic Monuments of the Eastern Bloc by Maria Popova The ghosts of communism, or what alien architecture has to do with societal memory and Serbia’s mountains. Having grown up in the former Eastern Bloc, I vividly remember the bizarre and beautiful monuments commissioned by the communist leaders of the 1960s and 70s, which remained as retrofuturistic remnants after the fall of communism, like the undying ghosts of an era most sought to forget but would always remember. These are the subject of Spomenik — a peculiar book by contemporary Belgian photographer Jan Kempenaers, who took a laborious trek across former Yugoslavia and The Balkans to photograph the strikingly beautiful yet odd structures tucked away in the region’s mountains. Kempenaers did not set out as a documentary photographer, but first and foremost as an artist seeking to create a new image. Podgaric Kruševo Kozara Petrova Gora Kosmaj Kadinjaca Niš Tjentište Korenica Jasenovac Ilirska Bistrica via MetaFilter | Images via Crack Two Share on Tumblr

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