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Kitchen 101: Fruits, Vegetables & Herbs

Kitchen 101: Fruits, Vegetables & Herbs
Kitchen 101: Fruits, Vegetables & Herbs I’d be remiss if I simply focused on imparting technical knowledge in the Kitchen 101 series here at Chasing Delicious. I’d be downright neglectful if I didn’t talk about ingredients, particularly the biggest misconception about produce today: that it is naturally available year-round. Time spent in transit or storage is not the only inflated aspect of buying produce out of season. The biggest problem with buying out of season produce, and the focus of this article, is the lack of freshness and sacrifice in flavor and nutrients. My favorite part about abiding by an ingredient’s natural availability is what I like to call the Thanksgiving effect. That being said, there are many factors that effects a particular ingredients season. While these charts will provide you with a general understanding of what is in season when, there are three additional steps you can take to ensure you are eating in season produce that is at its freshest. Related:  kitchen

How to Make Proper Barbecue Chicken | The Paupered Chef There's a lot of misconception when it comes to "barbecue." The problem is the word itself. It's used as a synonym for grilling, refers to the grill itself, or to the meat being grilled; it also has a sauce named after it; and sometimes it's just the word for the party itself held outdoors in somebody's backyard. What, actually, is "barbecue"? American purists see things a little differently. To them, "barbecue" is a wonderful Southern tradition of slow-cooking with indirect heat and woodsmoke to transform cuts of meat, often inexpensive ones, into succulent, unbelievably delicious results. Which brings us to barbecue chicken, a staple of the summer grill. The sad fact is that often times the answer is no. The problem, and the result, is charred all over the place, a crapshoot for succulence, often dry and sad. I believe good barbecue chicken is low and slow followed by fast and hot; that's the easiest way to achieve fantastic results. (makes 2 cups) Now, the chicken.

Kitchen 101: Cooking Methods Kitchen 101: Cooking Methods Buy the Cooking Methods Posters at The Sweet Tooth Paper Goods Company! Enter “LIFEHACKER” into the promo code box and get 10% off the Mixing Methods Poster! Slow and gentle, rough and fast, hot and wet. Some methods refer to where the heat is applied and others refer to the tool used to create heat. As for baking, you may be wondering just how many cooking methods are actually used in making pastries. Dry-Heat Cooking Methods The first of the two major categories in cooking methods is the Dry-Heat collection of methods. Baking Ninety percent of the recipes in this blog will call you to bake it at some point. Did you know? Baking refers to the cooking method that requires cooking in an enclosed space with dry heat. Tip: When using a convection oven, you can adjust the recipe by reducing the baking time by 25% or reducing the temperature by 25 degrees. Roasting Tip: When cooking large or tough cuts of meat, use a low temperature for a long cooking time. Barbecue

12 Substitutions for Baking Ingredients All set to bake and realize you're out of sugar or another essential ingredient? Here's a handy cheat sheet with 12 common baking subtitutions By Sue Gilbert M.S. Nutritionist - February 15, 2012 •Baking powder For each teaspoon use 1 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar. •Brown sugar For 1 cup: use 1 cup granulated sugar plus 2 tablespoons molasses or dark corn syrup. •Buttermilk For 1 cup: use 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar plus enough milk to make 1 cup and let stand five minutes, or use 1 cup yogurt. •ChocolateFor 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate: use 3 tablespoons cocoa + 1 tablespoon butter. •Heavy cream For 1 cup: use 2/3 cup milk and 1/3 cup butter. •EggsFor one large egg: use 1/4 cup cholesterol-free egg product (keep some in the freezer for emergencies like this). •Egg yolkFor one yolk: use 2 tablespoons cholesterol-free egg product. •FlourFor 1 cup all-purpose flour: use 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cake flour. •Honey For 1 cup: use 3/4 cup sugar + 1/4 cup liquid.

McDonalds Menu Items Around The World (Part 2, 32 pics) It’s an incredibly slow Food Network news day, so let’s pass the time until Sandra Lee does something stupid by gawking at McDonalds foods from around the world! Here’s a sampling of menu items that aren’t available in the United States: In Asia, you can pick up an icon sandwich, which is a chicken breast smothered with 2 different kinds of melted cheeses, bacon, and lettuce. This is the shaka-shaka chicken. Hong Kong just released a fried sweet potato pie in 2010. The Mega-Mac is HUGE. In Asia, you can also get a Diavlo chicken sandwich. Tomato seafood soup. The Carbonara chicken sandwich combines breakfast and lunch. In Japan, you can score a Double Mac Egg Burger. In Hong Kong and Tokyo, you can also get a double big mac on a pita. This is a salted lemon chicken sandwich, available in Japan. A fried bacon and potato pie! The “German Icon” is another variation of the icon sandwich. In Hong Kong, you can get a CBD: chicken bacon deluxe, served on a hearty roll. Tired of the McMuffin?

How to be a food snob - Food Advice There’s no more insufferable supper companion than a food snob: You know, one of those folks who sit around and complain that the sauce is too bright and the roux too bitter, or that the onions should have been allowed to sweat rather than brown. But hey, there’s something to be said for the power of their palates, their ability to pick up cues and vocalize what they’re tasting from the muddle of flavors in the mouth. (Even if, as I sometimes suspect, they just think they can.) I’m not talking about “super tasters” — those few who physically have more taste buds than the rest of us — but the eaters and cooks who always seem to know just what it is they’re eating. How do they do it? And more importantly, other than spending $60,000 on a culinary degree, could I train myself to do it, too? Breathe, Damn It! Our tongues are equipped to experience only salty, bitter, sour and sweet flavors, plus umami, a newish term we borrowed from the Japanese to define a savory tasting sensation.

bethany actually» Blog Archive » Make your own vanilla extract Wouldn’t you be happy to get this as a Christmas gift? I read Catherine Newman’s post about making homemade vanilla as Christmas gifts and thought, Brilliant! I’m gonna do that this year! So we did. I bought a dozen 4-ounce clear Boston round glass bottles and 20 organic Tahitian vanilla beans (I actually received 23 beans). Troy went to BevMo and picked up a couple of liters of vodka. [UPDATE 12 October 2011: The company I originally bought vanilla beans from seems to be on hiatus. I also gathered my two lovely and capable assistants, Annalie and my mom Debbie. For each bottle of vanilla, you’ll need 2-3 beans and 1/2 cup of vodka. First, we used the scissors to cut each vanilla bean in half lengthwise and then again crosswise. We stuffed all the bean pieces into the bottles, seven or eight pieces per bottle. We got vanilla-bean flecks and sticky juice on our fingers, but it washed off easily and as a bonus made our hands smell yummy. Lather.

100 Greatest Cooking Tips (of all time!) 1. Remember, y'all, it’s all about the prep. Take away the stress by doing the prep the night or day before. You'll look like a star.Paula Deen Paula’s Best Dishes 2. The smaller the item, the higher the baking temperature. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. How To Trick Delivery Sites Into Sending You Food For Fun, Profit And Misery DIY Sriracha a.k.a. Rooster Sauce Impress your Chili Head friends by busting out a bottle of this DIY Sriracha Chile Sauce! Sriracha as we know it today has been popularized by Huy Fong Foods and their big red "rooster" bottle (complete with a giant rooster logo and bright green cap, making it easy to identify in your fridge). But the sauce has a rich history and is named after a coastal city in central Thailand's Chonburi Province "Si Racha". This sauce has a great, addicting flavor -- hot, sweet and garlicky -- and just like the real "Rooster Sauce", it tastes awesome on just about anything. (recipe adapted from The Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens) Ingredients: **Gloves** 1 3/4 pounds Fresno Chili Peppers, Red Jalapenos or Red Serrano ( I used Fresno) 3 Thai Chili Peppers 2 tbsp Garlic Powder + additional as needed 2 tbsp Granulated Sugar + more as needed 1 tbsp light brown sugar 1 tbsp kosher salt 3 cloves garlic 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar + more as needed Water as needed Kitchen Equipment: 2lb Glass jar 1 bottle Funnel

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