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Cheap, Healthy, Good - RECIPE INDEX

Cheap, Healthy, Good - RECIPE INDEX
Related:  Food blogs & resources (+ ingredients)

Kitchen Hack: One-Minute Bread - StumbleUpon Oven-fresh bread is one of life’s simple joys. Ciabatta, a crisp-crusted Italian bread with hints of sourdough and loads of crannies longing for butter, is one of the easiest breads to make at home. Why are we talking about baking bread on Lifehack? Because kitchen hacks aren’t just impressive, they often have very tasty results! In this instance, I’m going to show you how to make ciabatta with less than one minute of prep time. How is that possible? You may have heard of “no-knead” bread before. I wanted something very, very simple that delivered great results in 60 seconds of prep time or less. For your ciabatta you’ll need: 4 cups of all-purpose flour (do NOT pack the flour into the measuring cup)2 cups of warm water1 teaspoon of salt1/4 teaspoon of granulated yeast (or equivalent) For the gorgeous readers needing metric equivalents of this recipe, Toon left a comment with the following conversion: Have everything handy? 1. 2. Add flour and salt to your bowl of yeasty water. 3. 4. 5.

The Salty Cod Fluffy Pancakes | Blogger For Hire This pancake recipe is the result of mixing and matching different recipes from many different sources. It is the result of trying and failing so many times, that I almost declared pancakes as the one breakfast recipe I couldn’t master. But I persisted, and this recipe is perfect – as perfect as a pancakes recipe can be, because making pancakes does involve frying, and frying is something that each of us needs to play with. It changes depending on your type of stove (gas or electric), on how hot the skillet is, and on how evenly hot you manage to keep it while frying multiple batches. But the instructions here are as close as it gets to “perfect,” and the result? This recipe makes 16-18 pancakes. Fluffy Pancakes Makes 16-18 pancakes. Dry Ingredients 2 cups all purpose flour 1/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1.5 tablespoons baking powder (make sure it’s fresh) Directions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Serve with warm maple syrup and berries. (Just in case) –> More Pancake Recipes: Similar Posts:

Vegetative Uncertainty » mangolandia Humans! In India when speaking of our dead, the people say “she left the body” rather than “she died”. That is, there is a deep clarity — for me our subconscious patterns of speech reveal deeply the structure of how we think — about what death is, or as it has sometimes occurred to me, “the unreality of death”. Krishna and Jesus are both pretty into this idea – “For the soul there is neither birth nor death at any time. “He who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal.” I’ll let you figure out the who’s whom, but the point is that many tribes and cultures have come up with elaborate rituals around the Leaving of the Body. In Mexico, Dia de Los Muertos is celebrated every year, on November 1st and 2nd, to pray for and remember our dead. Now it’s all beginning to come together. You’ve got to do this thing. I think it’s important for those of us still in the body. * filling (salt) * rice * sauce * goodies avocado finely diced onions cilantro

homemade pop tarts I never had a Pop-Tart until college. I realize that for some people this may cause a shocked reaction on par with my husband’s the time I told him I’ve never watched Goonies before (or Jacob’s, upon discovering the internet). Obviously I grew up under a rock, right? I understand that if I had toasted it, my experience might have been better. I can’t believe I waited so long to make these. Most recipes I have come across use a pie dough for the pastry but I was really stuck on getting a crust that was a little more sturdy — one with an egg. One year ago: Black Bread Homemade Pop Tarts Adapted from King Arthur Flour Pastry 2 cups (8 1/2 ounces) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into pats 1 large egg 2 tablespoons (1 ounce) milk 1 additional large egg (to brush on pastry) Jam Filling 3/4 cup (8 ounces) jam 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon cold water Make the dough: Whisk together the flour, sugar, and salt.

Scott's Pizza Chronicles: Why I Love the International Pizza Expo A typical scene at Pizza Expo. [Photographs: Scott Wiener] The response is common when I tell someone I'm heading to Las Vegas for the International Pizza Expo. "What is the International Pizza Expo???" I'm not surprised this event isn't common knowledge, especially since there's little mention of it in the media (including this very website). I attended my first pizza trade show in September 2006, the last time the National Association of Pizzeria Operators (NAPO) held one in Atlantic City. Being an international event, pizzas like this Japanese one are entered into culinary competition. Before I get to the good stuff, let me clear out some of the negatives that come with Pizza Expo. Once you're inside the convention center, the outside world is inconsequential. As much as I love free pizza, that's far from being the main attraction at Pizza Expo. This product helps you carry stacks of pizza boxes. Jonathan Goldsmith playing with dough on the show floor.

Two bits of good news | The Tummy Train You guys!!!!!!! I did it. I made macarons !!!!! With feet!!!!! Now on a typical day, seeing this much exclamation points would make me cringe, but not today. In hindsight I kind of wish I had spent significantly less time worrying about whether I would fail or not and used that time to actually attempt macarons. Now I have to credit another little critter here for incessantly pestering encouraging me to get up and make these cute little cookies: my brother Jason , who countered my every ridiculous excuse and insecurity with equally ridiculous statements that in the end made much more sense than my fears. Now Jason’s acts of brotherly valour come few and far between, but I’m quite certain this one won’t go forgotten by me. After we popped the first tray of cookies into the oven, Jason went off to shoot for his blog and I was left on my lonesome to watch my macarons bake. 5 minutes went past. “THERE’S FEET! I am not at all saying that I am a “natural” at macaron-making. 1. 10. 1. 3. 4. 5.

Recipes - Restaurant Girl: Best Food Blog & Restaurant Guide Wild Mushroom Stew Stew is a generally a great go-to for home cooks during winter —simply throw bits of meat from the freezer and odds and ends from the fridge into an oversized pot, and forget about them for hours at a time. But the best thing about this stew is that it will actually appeal to vegetarians (and non-vegetarians!) Read More Baked Butternut Squash Arancini What’s not to love about the addictive Italian bar snack, Arancini? Cheesy Cherry Lambic Fondue It’s New York Beer Week, which gives us a fantastic excuse to ingest suds as often as possible over the next seven days. “Go for the Gold” Russian Beet Borscht We’re all about rooting for the home team during the Olympics, but something about the celebrations in Sochi really have us craving Russian food. Chocolate Red Wine Torte Red wine and chocolate tend to play a starring role in most Valentine’s Day celebrations, and not just because they’re so totally yummy. Lunar New Year Long Life Noodles Caramel Apple Donuts

www.kingarthurflour Love brownies. Love their shiny, flaky top that shatters into micro-thin shards that shower onto your fingers as you eat. Love their dark, gooey center. Their “chocolate nirvana” flavor. Sometimes can’t deal with the bake, wait to cool, cutting into squares messiness and fuss of brownies. Every time I make these cookies (which, truth be told, is quite often), I think of a former colleague, Ana, who left King Arthur last year in order to be a full-time mom to her 2-year-old twins. The test kitchen bakers loved Ana. Ana still visits occasionally, 2-year-olds in tow. And when she does, she’ll invariably nose out any chocolate, and treat us to her classic reaction: “Perfect! These cookies are basically brownies: flat, round, 2 ½” brownies. First task: Combine the chocolate and butter. Melt in the microwave till softened… …then stir till smooth. Stir the chocolate into eggs and sugar, which you’ve beaten together. Refrigerate the batter for an hour; it’ll stiffen up nicely. Buy vs.

La Happy Food : les aliments anti-blues de l’hiver ! En pleine morosité hivernale, certains aliments contribueraient à améliorer notre sensation de bien-être et auraient le pouvoir de nous redonner le sourire et un peu de vitalité. Limitons les vertus thérapeutiques, bien que prouvées du chocolat mais peu recommandables pour notre silhouette, et notons sur notre liste de courses les aliments 100% naturel qui doperont notre moral sous la grisaille ambiante ! Le thé vert thé vert Idéal pour assurer son hydratation quotidienne (pour rappel, nous devons boire 1,5L d’eau par jour), le thé vert réduirait également les symptômes d’un état déprimé ou dépressif ! Epinards, laitue et brocolis épinards Ils sont excellents et très important pour le fonctionnement du cerveau car riches en vitamine B9 (également appelée acide folique). Le saumon, le hareng, le maquereau, les sardines saumon Les myrtilles, framboises, fraises et baies fruits rouges Bien que difficiles à trouver en cette période de l’année, ces fruits rouges auraient un fort pouvoir calmant.

Cinnamon Roll Pancakes Updated 9/22/11 to Add: If you’re coming here to sample these delicious Cinnamon Roll Pancakes, you just might like the latest recipe that I’ve posted for Pumpkin Cinnamon Roll Pancakes too. And Gingerbread- Cinnamon Roll Pancakes too. Enjoy! Here’s a short video sharing how to make these delicious pancakes: If you’ve ever thought you needed a reason to eat pancakes, today is the day: National Pancake Day! How do you like your pancakes? But recently I started dreaming about mixing cinnamon rolls and pancakes together… and this is what I came up with- my new favorite pancake: Cinnamon Roll Pancakes. I have a wonderfully fluffy pancake batter that I like to use (recipe below) so I swirled a bit of cinnamon roll filling into the pancake. And they cooked up just like a pancake- fluffy, but with craters of crusty, sugary cinnamon swirled within. You might find three of these stacked in a fancy breakfast restaurant, but I’m gonna tell you that one pancake is all you need. Oh yeah. Ingredients:

Ingredients for American Baking in Paris Although we can’t expect things to be like ‘back home’, many of us do miss certain things that we are used to in American recipes. While French has wonderful ingredients, for bakers, it can be a challenge to adapt to new ingredients or ones that behave differently than what we’re used to. Here’s a list of commonly used baking ingredients and where you can find them, or what you can use in their place. Happy baking! Buttermilk, Heavy Cream, and Sour Cream Many grocery stores and cheese shops sell lait ribot, fermented milk from Brittany. For sour cream, full-fat (20%) fromage blanc is the closest substitute for baking. Heavy cream is called crème liquide, crème fluide, or crème entière in French. Monoprix carries their own brand of heavy cream in small plastic bottles, and Elle & Vire is one brand that sells UHT cream in paper cartons, as well as crème entière épaisse, which comes in a pouch and is quite thick, but works well in most applications that call for heavy cream. Brown Sugar Flour

French For Foodies | Recipes, French culinary secrets and cooking adventures by an Aussie in Paris Mizuna Mizuna (ミズナ(水菜), "water greens"), qian jing shui cai,[1] kyona,[2] Japanese mustard greens,[3][4] or spider mustard,[3] is a cultivated crop plant from the species Brassica rapa var. niposinica a dark green, serrated leafed plant. Description and use[edit] The taste of 'mizuna' has been described as a "piquant, mild peppery flavor...slightly spicy, but less so than arugula A seller of packaged seeds in the United Kingdom describes 'mizuna' as: A vigorous grower producing numerous stalks bearing dark green, deeply cut and fringed leaves. According to the BBC: Not only is it good to eat, it's also quite decorative, with glossy, serrated, dark green leaves and narrow white stalks, looking good in flower beds and as edging. An online recipe site says: ...this vegetable averages 14" to 16" in height with leaves that are green and yellow, smooth in texture and somewhat feathery in shape. Varieties[edit] Cultivation[edit] 'Mizuna' has been cultivated in Japan since ancient times. References[edit]

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