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Bethany actually» Blog Archive » Make your own vanilla extract

Bethany actually» Blog Archive » Make your own vanilla extract
Wouldn’t you be happy to get this as a Christmas gift? I read Catherine Newman’s post about making homemade vanilla as Christmas gifts and thought, Brilliant! I’m gonna do that this year! So we did. I bought a dozen 4-ounce clear Boston round glass bottles and 20 organic Tahitian vanilla beans (I actually received 23 beans). Troy went to BevMo and picked up a couple of liters of vodka. [UPDATE 12 October 2011: The company I originally bought vanilla beans from seems to be on hiatus. I also gathered my two lovely and capable assistants, Annalie and my mom Debbie. For each bottle of vanilla, you’ll need 2-3 beans and 1/2 cup of vodka. First, we used the scissors to cut each vanilla bean in half lengthwise and then again crosswise. We stuffed all the bean pieces into the bottles, seven or eight pieces per bottle. We got vanilla-bean flecks and sticky juice on our fingers, but it washed off easily and as a bonus made our hands smell yummy. Lather. Related:  Recetas

Cream Puffs In Venice DIY Tile Coasters I have a very bad habit of filling up water glasses and leaving them all around the house, kind of like that little girl from the movie, Signs. I also have a bad habit of never using coasters. I guess it's a sign that I am becoming adult when that pesky water ring left behind starts to get me. That, or my OCD compulsion to clean when in the procrastination kind of mood. Let's go with becoming adult though, makes me sound more domestic. Here is a simple tutorial for DIY tile coasters at my prefered price range, cheap. Supplies are pretty minimal. A "sheet" of moasic tile. First, cut the tile to match the dimensions of the pieces of wood. Now the fun (and messy) part. Take your sponge and ring it out so not sopping wet. Oooh, how shiny and pretty! Take those cork or felt pads and apply to each corner of the square. And voila!

Honeyed Pears in Puff Pastry Poaching fruit is one of my favorite things to do when cold weather arrives. It's so warming to stand over a boiling pot of fragrant spices and lose yourself in thought. When I made these, I couldn't help but daydream as I stirred; if I were a pear... That sounds a little silly, but that's what I'd want... if I were a pear. The idea for these came from the Pepperidge Farm website. On a personal note, our Christmas tree is already up courtesy of Mr. Since poaching is a relatively easy task, I'll skip to some helpful tips for wrapping the pears in puff pastry. The poaching liquid has a high concentration of sugar, so your pears will be sticky. When you reach the top, tuck in the end piece of pastry behind the last spiral. 4 small pears 1 sheet of ready made puff pastry dough, thawed 4 cups water 2 cups sugar 1 cup honey 1/2 lemon 1 vanilla bean, seeded with hull reserved 3 sticks of cinnamon 6-8 whole cloves Peel pears and core from the bottom. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Pumpkin Bars with Cream Cheese Frosting Cider mills, apples, cinnamon, doughnuts, sweaters, jeans, boots, leaves, football, tailgate parties, pies, soups, stews, chili...those are what come to mind when I think of fall. The air turns nice and crisp and I am immediately reminded of fall in Michigan, with all of the beautiful leaves and the perfect weather to leave the house wearing jeans, a sweater, cute boots and a scarf. My all-time favorite outfit. Another item that always comes to mind when I think of fall always puts a huge smile on my face. As soon as the first of October arrives, I immediately take out my fall decor from the storage closet and begin placing these beautiful little gems all around the house. I have quite the collection already and I'm always picking up more whenever I go to the store. I love pumpkins. Do you know what else I love about pumpkins? Pumpkin Bars with Cream Cheese Frosting Ingredients: Bars * Recipe slightly adapted from Paula Deen

Super easy, homemade bread | The Wanna be Country Girl This is it! This is the only white bread recipe you’ll ever need. It’s that good. I can’t take the credit though, I got this recipe from a fellow member on a website named www.backyardchickens.com her name is Gumpsgirl and I say a thank you ever time I make this bread. Here we go. first put 2 cup almost hot water in a bowl, add 4 teaspoons yeast (I like rapid rise, I’m not patient) next add 1 tablespoon of sugar. give it a good stir. Here’s where the fun begins. add your 1/4 cup oil (I use olive because it makes me feel all chefy) Yes, that is a word….I think….I’m not sure…..I don’t care, I’m using it anyway! next sprinkle in the salt ( I like Kosher salt, and I’m not going to tell you why…….just kidding! hold your nose and pour that funky yeast mix in turn on the mixer and stand back let it mix on low until the dough comes away from the sides of the bowl and all ingredients are incorporated I’m not patient and if given half the chance I will be lazy. turn the dough onto a floured surface This

smitten kitchen DIY Braided Bead Bracelet It’s been awhile since our last bracelet DIY. I don’t know about you, but our wrists have been begging for another colorful addition for months now. So after playing with some materials that were already on hand, we’ve created a tutorial for a braided bead bracelet, which is a not so distant cousin of the hex nut and wrap bracelet. Because honestly, you can never have too many . . . You’ll need: Cut the waxed linen cord into a 26″ and 19″ piece. Tie a knot about half an inch down from the loops. Start braiding the strands. Push the bead against the base of the braid, and cross the left strand over the middle. Keep a finger at the base of the braid, holding the beads in their place and keeping the braid tight. Finish the bracelet with another inch of braided cord, measuring it against the wrist. Thread on a two hole button – two strands through one hole and one strand through another. Trim the end. Your bracelet is finished! (all images by HonestlyWTF)

Homemade Chocolate-Hazelnut Spread Recipe (Better Than Nutella) » Su Good Sweets If someone offered you portable chocolate that could instantly be spread on bread, fruit, crackers and pastries, how could you refuse? Thus began my love affair with Nutella, a European spread made of hazelnut butter and cocoa. During my days at NYU, I was at a make-your-own sandwich bar when I first tried Nutella with French bread. What a revelation! The chocolate oozed out of the nooks and crannies, while the spread’s smoothness contrasted the bread’s crust. I then saw that bagels were an excellent vehicle for Nutella. Fascinated by this new condiment, I bought myself a jar and finished it in one week. According to Ferrero’s website, Nutella was created in the 1940s in the midst of a chocolate shortage. According to Mort Rosenblum’s Chocolate: A Bittersweet Saga of Dark and Light, a 13-ounce jar of Nutella contains 50 (2/3 cup) hazelnuts, 1 1/2 cups skim milk, “enough cocoa to make it brown, and a lot of sugar.” If you love this original recipe and repost it, please credit this site.

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