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MIT Technology Review

MIT Technology Review

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www.closertotruth Raymond "Ray" Kurzweil is an American author, inventor, futurist, and Director of Engineering at Google. Aside from futurology, he is involved in fields such as optical character recognition (OCR), text-to-speech synthesis, speech recognition technology, and electronic keyboard instruments. He is the author of several books on health, artificial intelligence (AI), transhumanism, the technological singularity, and futurism. Kurzweil is generally recognized as a public advocate for the futurist and transhumanist movements, due to his stances on life extension technologies, his efforts to forecast future advances in technology, and his interest in the concept of the technological singularity. At the same time, he has attracted significant criticism from scientists and thinkers.

Hamburg’s Plan to Eliminate Cars in 20 Years Hamburg's Plan to Eliminate Cars in 20 Years About 40% of the area of Hamburg, the second largest city in Germany, is made up of green areas, cemeteries, sports facilities, gardens, parks and squares. For the first time ever, the city has decided to unite them together via pedestrian and cycle routes. It's all part of the "Green Network Plan," which aims to eliminate the need for vehicles in Hamburg over the next 20 years. Bonnie Berger Bonnie Berger is Professor of Applied Mathematics, and on the faculty of the Computation and Biology group at the MIT-CSAIL. She is also an affiliate member of Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST), and MIT's Computer Science and Systems Biology initiative (CSBi). Bonnie Berger received the A.B. in computer science from Brandeis University, the S.M. and Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 1986 and 90. Berger's thesis won the George M. Sprowles Prize, under the supervision of Silvio Micali.

Best 20 Sites to Download eBooks 20 Sites to Download Free eBooks for your Digital Library With all the technology around these days, we don’t need a tree to make a book. Scholastic survey of 2014 shows that 61% of school kids in the USA read digital books vs. 25% in 2010. Print books, CDs, Blu-ray discs are going to the past. Now we can download eBooks onto our Kindles, iPads, iPod, phones, laptops… the list is endless. 40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable.

When will Singularity happen – and will it turn Earth into heaven or hell? Defined as the point where computers become more intelligent than humans and where human intelligence can be digitally stored, Singularity hasn't happened yet. First theorised by mathematician John von Neumann in the 1950s, the 'Singularitarian Immortalist' (and Director of Engineering at Google) Ray Kurzweil thinks that by 2045, machine intelligence will be infinitely more powerful than all human intelligence combined, and that technological development will be taken over by the machines. "There will be no distinction, post-Singularity, between human and machine or between physical and virtual reality," he writes in his book 'The Singularity Is Near'. But – 2045? Are we really that close?

Patricia Piccinini - Wikipedia Piccinini's concept of what human-animal hybrids might look like are part of a sculpture entitled The Young Family. Graham, sculpture, 2016. Piccinini's latest work for the TAC's public safety campaign 'Towards Zero' Shtetl-Optimized Also, on a completely unrelated topic, my friend Jonah Sinick has created a memorial YouTube video for the great mathematician Bill Thurston, who sadly passed away last week. Maybe I should cave in and set up a Twitter feed for this sort of thing...] [ Argh! For some bizarre reason, comments were turned off for this post. 100 Extensive University Libraries from Around the World that Anyone Can Access Universities house an enormous amount of information and their libraries are often the center of it all. You don't have to be affiliated with any university to take advantage of some of what they have to offer. From digital archives, to religious studies, to national libraries, these university libraries from around the world have plenty of information for you. Digital Libraries Capturing images of manuscripts, art, and artifacts, digital libraries are an excellent way of both preserving the past and sharing it with everyone. Harvard University Library.

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