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What Makes a Leader?

What Makes a Leader?
It was Daniel Goleman who first brought the term “emotional intelligence” to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name, and it was Goleman who first applied the concept to business with his 1998 HBR article, reprinted here. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership—such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—are required for success, they are insufficient. Truly effective leaders are also distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. These qualities may sound “soft” and unbusinesslike, but Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results. Every businessperson knows a story about a highly intelligent, highly skilled executive who was promoted into a leadership position only to fail at the job. Evaluating Emotional Intelligence

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How To Tell If You're An Entrepreneur Pressed to describe the stereotypical entrepreneur, which words would you use? Passionate? Dedicated? Optimistic? Sure, those apply. But insecure and troublemaker are more accurate, according to 'treps who know a success when they see one. The 48 Laws of Power Background[edit] Greene initially formulated some of the ideas in The 48 Laws of Power while working as a writer in Hollywood and concluding that today's power elite shared similar traits with powerful figures throughout history.[5] In 1995, Greene worked as a writer at Fabrica, an art and media school, and met a book packager named Joost Elffers.[4][8] Greene pitched a book about power to Elffers and six months later, Elffers requested that Greene write a treatment.[4] Although Greene was unhappy in his current job, he was comfortable and saw the time needed to write a proper book proposal as too risky.[10] However, at the time Greene was rereading his favorite biography about Julius Caesar and took inspiration from Caesar's decision to cross the Rubicon River and fight Pompey, thus inciting the Great Roman Civil War.[10] Greene would follow Caesar's example and write the treatment, which later became The 48 Laws of Power.[10] He would note this as the turning point of his life.[10]

33 Ways To Fund Your Startup Business No matter what the economic situation, someone somewhere, eyes bright with potential, is looking to start a new business. Funds are often the biggest hurdle to what could otherwise be a lucrative opportunity. Here are some ways - traditional and/ or creative - to raise money for your startup business.

Jack Welch GE's 4 E and one P curve (StratoServe) This blog had discussed Jack Welch's 4E's and one P in an earlier post; given the interest among blog readers here is some more clarification about the concept. To evaluate managers GE started a system of differentiating managers on performance but were hard pressed to identify the characteristics that differentiated managers on the "Vitality" curve which is essentially a “grading” curve or graph for managers. The word "vitality" is confusing because it refers more to being vital or essential to the organization rather than being "vital" in the "having high energy" sense. In fact,"Energy" is one of the 4 E's but let's go over the 4 E's of GE leadership briefly: Energy: High personal energy of the manager is important.

4 Powerful Reasons to Meditate and How To Get Started Meditation is the art of silencing the mind. When the mind is silent, concentration is increased and we experience inner peace in the midst of worldly turmoil. This elusive inner peace is what attracts so many people to meditation and is a quality everyone can benefit from. How to Deliver a Great Presentation Like Steve Jobs 19 Jul 2012 If you like to learn some of the techniques and styles that make Steve Jobs such a great presenter, watch these excellent videos and slides by Carmine Gallo, author of ‘The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs.’ couch mode print story Steve Jobs is among the most polished presenters in the world. He doesn’t use any bullet points in his presentations, his keynote addresses are free of any jargon, there are very few words in the slides but they have photographs and headlines that are hard to forget.

businessinsider How do you know if you’re a fantastic boss? Employees who love you may be a good sign—but not if they love you because you’re way too lenient. Great results, like high sales or fast project turnaround, might indicate a fantastic boss as well—but not if you’re getting great results at the expense of a healthy culture or happy team members. Here are the 12 personality traits of outstanding bosses. Check ’em out, check ’em off, and (if necessary) change your ways. Infographic courtesy of Officevibe. Tutorials - StumbleUpon Ponzimonium After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ... Quarterly Earnings Report A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance.

How To Be Persuasive What Is Persuasion? Persuasion is the act of getting a sentient being other than yourself to adopt a particular belief or pursue a particular action. This tutorial will teach you how to excel at doing just that. Our examples will assume a variety of different specific circumstances, but the principles we present will be applicable in a myriad of situations. businessinsider Most people associate a weak leader with being docile, deferential, timid or meek. While that may have some merit, weak leaders can also be bombastic, egocentric, domineering, dictatorial and imperious. Even if you are successful at adding to the bottom line, bringing in new clients or developing new products and services, if people are not seeking you out or jockeying to be on your team, you are a weak leader.

Take typing lessons, test your typing speed and practice typing for free! This is, a web application that will help you teach touch typing. Touch typing is typing without using the sense of sight to find the keys. A person possessing touch typing skills will know their location on the keyboard through muscle memory.