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A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking

A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking
My approach to staff development (and teaching) borrows from the thinking of Donald Finkel who believed that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.” He goes on to write, … to reflectively experience is to make connections within the details of the work of the problem, to see it through the lens of abstraction or theory, to generate one’s own questions about it, to take more active and conscious control over understanding. ~ From Teaching With Your Mouth Shut Over the last few years I’ve led many teachers and administrators on classroom walkthroughs designed to foster a collegial conversation about teaching and learning. The walkthroughs served as roving Socratic seminars and a catalyst for reflection. But reflection can be a challenging endeavor. In an effort to help schools become more reflective learning environments, I’ve developed this “Taxonomy of Reflection.” – modeled on Bloom’s approach. 1. Take my Prezi tour of the Taxonomy Trackback URL

http://www.peterpappas.com/2010/01/taxonomy-reflection-critical-thinking-students-teachers-principals.html

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Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection Too often, conversations about digital portfolios center on the tools: how to save, share, and publish student work. Mastering the technical component of digital portfolios is critical, and students do need an opportunity to showcase their work to a broader audience. However, when we let the process of curate > reflect > publish serve as the sole focal point, digital portfolios become summative in nature and are viewed as an add-on at the end of a unit, project, or activity. For digital portfolios to be truly valuable to both teachers and students, they need to provide insight into not only what students created, but also how and why.

A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation by Terry Heick When researching student motivation and gamification late last year, I came across the most comprehensive gamification framework I’ve ever seen. Developed by gamification expert Yu-kai Chou, it was an ambitious effort that distinguished black hat gamification (which is “bad”–think Farmville and Candy Crush) from white hat gamification (which is “good”–think Minecraft or even an ACT score).

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning Poster Hey guys! Here is a free Bloom's Taxonomy Poster from Suzy Deasy. It's great to use to help remember the right questioning to ask your students during a lesson! Evolving the E-Learning Experience for the 21st Century What always stuns me are vendors who state they know what their learners want, but in reality have no clue, because they themselves do not see the technology and its usage among the masses. A greater number of people, worldwide are using SaaS then ever before, mobile products, tablets – especially the iPad – is growing at a feverish pace, people are using online storage, beyond just placing photos and media, and open source is continuing expansion. Each one of these features could be implemented into systems in six months or less. Each one is available today on the Internet for free and these types of products are gaining mass in the global market. Your end users make up that mass, and a statement I hear often is that people aren’t staying in the systems to fully benefit from it.

The Reflective Student: A Taxonomy of Reflection (Part II) reflective student Reflection can be a challenging endeavor. It's not something that's fostered in school - typically someone else tells you how you're doing! At best, students can narrate what they did, but have trouble thinking abstractly about their learning - patterns, connections and progress. In an effort to help schools become more reflective learning environments, I've developed this "Taxonomy of Reflection" - modeled on Bloom's approach. It's posted in four installments:

Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection A few weeks ago, I met with a group of educators to discuss their observations from a series of learning walks in classrooms. They found that though students could accurately tell them what they were doing, they struggled to articulate what they might be learning. In response, I suggested building reflection into the daily routine. Sensory Systems that Make up the Learning Hierarchy of a Strong Academic Foundation - Integrated Learning Strategies This article contains information regarding important sensory systems and the learning hierarchy that comes from developing each one. Affiliate links are included for your convenience. Whether a child is using his or her hands to write, ears to listen, eyes to read, or their entire body to play sports, they can execute and learn best when they are active and using all of their senses to the fullest. When a child’s brain directs the body to sequence and perform motor tasks this is called motor planning. The ability to motor plan relies on adequate functioning of all the sensory systems. In the learning sphere, a child must build on sensory input from many different sensory systems to fully unlock his or her learning potential.

Professional Learning That Matters 10 Keys to Making Professional Learning Meaningful By Samantha Cleaver Chances are, as you look at your calendar of scheduled professional learning days, you aren’t overcome with excitement. Traditionally, teacher professional learning has ranged from the good (the workshop that’s actually hands-on), to the bad (the never-ending PowerPoint presentation), to the ugly (remember that one presenter…). But, as the Common Core State Standards become the norm, the new standards and the expectations around problem solving and critical thinking are prompting a new look at teacher development. In the process, more districts and schools are thinking of ways to make professional learning meaningful and engaging.

Moving beyond self-directed learning: Network-directed learning This site has been created to foster discussion on how our thinking, learning, and organizational activities are impacted through technology and societal changes. Since the original publication of Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age, I've been approached by many people requesting additional thinking and discussion. Four tools are available to provide dialogue: Blog for my personal reflective thoughtsWiki for collaborative content creationDiscussion forums for discussion on issues impacted by a connectivist view of learningEmail list for discussions on technology, networks and learning Most resources on this site are intended for public viewing, but contributing to the wiki or discussion forums requires registration. Please create your account by clicking the "join" text on the top, right-hand corner. If you are interested in general learning and technology trends, please visit my elearnspace site.

Where is reflection in the learning process? Today, we finished the second week of an interpersonal communications course. The students in the course are first term college students, a few fresh out of high school. As is my common practice, I end my week of instruction with reflective questions for the students: What was your significant learning this past week?What principles for everyday life can you extract from our class activities? (Note: The activities are experiential).What did you learn or what was reinforced about yourself? Wanna Know If Students Are Learning? Ask Them These 4 Questions It can be a struggle to best help students understand what they are learning or for students to articulate their learning in meaningful ways. This was especially difficult for me starting out in on my teaching journey. Based on how I had been taught to be an educator the best ways to know if students are learning was to give them a test. If they failed, it was their fault and they needed to do better next time. It took me a long time to learn that in the process of learning the teacher and the student need to be partners.

Learning Principles - Enhancing Education The following list presents the basic principles that underlie effective learning. These principles are distilled from research from a variety of disciplines. Students’ prior knowledge can help or hinder learning.Students come into our courses with knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes gained in other courses and through daily life. As students bring this knowledge to bear in our classrooms, it influences how they filter and interpret what they are learning. If students’ prior knowledge is robust and accurate and activated at the appropriate time, it provides a strong foundation for building new knowledge.

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