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Allan's Blog

Allan's Blog
Fourni par Traduction DOWNLOAD THE LATEST VERSION: V4 published Mar 2015. This PDF Poster has links to 122 of the latest and most popular educational apps. Now these resources are available in 19 different languages. V4.0 was published in March 2015 but I knew I was onto something useful when I first put the Padagogy Wheel together in July 2012. So why the need for Version 2.0? We need to have transformation at the core of what we do: If it is all about the students, where do you start with curriculum and/or teaching design – surely it is with what do you want your graduates to look like? Technology integration into the fabric of learning and teaching: is where we should be heading with all we do as teachers. Finally, can you help with V3.0? Please join in the conversation with your ideas and comments using the comments area of this blog. The Padagogy Wheel by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Blended Learning "Blended learning" has become the term that captures the notion that student learn -- at least in part -- in an online environment, which is supervised by an adult. Blended learning is different than "casual learning," which is learning outside the school system that is unstructured and unsupervised. Students in "blended" environments take tests and are assessed on how much they have learned. But the key to the concept has to do with the "personalized" nature of learning: that technology makes it possible for students who either learn differently or have different interests to encounter material presented in a way that is engaging and meaningful to them. The trend of creating "blended" environments is on the uptick: In the year 2000, approximately 45,000 K-12 students took an online course. According to the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 75% of US school districts had one or more students enrolled in a blended learning course in 2010.

Bloomin' Apps This page gathers all of the Bloomin' Apps projects in one place.Each image has clickable hotspots and includes suggestions for iPad, Android, Google and online tools and applications to support each of the levels of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy.I have created a page to allow you to share your favorite online tool, iOS, or Android app with others. Cogs of the Cognitive Processes I began to think about the triangular shape of Bloom's Taxonomy and realized I thought of it a bit differently.Since the cognitive processes are meant to be used when necessary, and any learner goes in and out of the each level as they acquire new content and turn it into knowledge, I created a different type of image that showcased my thoughts about Bloom's more meaningfully.Here is my visual which showcases the interlocking nature of the cognitive processes or, simply, the "Cogs of the Cognitive Processes". IPAD APPS TO SUPPORT BLOOM'S REVISED TAXONOMYassembled by Kathy Schrock​ Bloom's and SAMR: My thoughts

untitled Monster List of iBook Tutorials There are numerous sites that are now offering Tutorials and how-to guides for creating ebooks in iBook Author. As teachers are now comfortable with the idea of creating their own e-textbooks more and more people are looking for resources to learn how to build touch enabled books that take full advantage of the iPad capabilities. Inserting video and high resolution photographs is one thing but how about inserting 3D manipulatives and models that are touch sensitive. Here is a list of some of the resources online. If you know of other good ones please add them in the comments section and we will update the list. Web Tutorials: Publishing with iBooks Author: This book is intended to get you up and writing in iBooks Author. Want to create your own interactive eBook for the iPad? Emerson College - Department of Journalism: This is a great little site with close to 40 small tutorials for learning to use iBooks Author. Videos: 1. 2.

Foucault and His Panopticon - power, knowledge, Jeremy Bentham, surveillance, smart mobs, protests, cooperation, philosopher Michel Foucault Above all else, Michel Foucault believed in the freedom of people. He also realized that as individuals, we react to situations in different ways. Along with other social theorists, Foucault believed that knowledge is always a form of power, but he took it a step further and told us that knowledge can be gained from power; producing it, not preventing it. Knowledge linked to power, not only assumes the authority of 'the truth' but has the power to make itself true. For him, power exists everywhere and comes from everywhere; it was a key concept because it acts as a type of relation between people, a complex form of strategy, with the ability to secretly shape another's behaviour. One of the techniques/regulatory modes of power/knowledge that Foucault cited was the Panopticon, an architectural design put forth by Jeremy Bentham in the mid-19th Century for prisons, insane asylums, schools, hospitals, and factories. Foucault's Panopticon Related Papers Bibliography

The iPad Pedagogy Wheel One question that often arises is how can I use this nice shiny iPad that you have given me to support teaching and learning? In a previous blog post I talked about assessment and the importance of deeper and higher thinking skills. I mentioned in that post that using Bloom’s Taxonomy is one way of getting teachers to think differently about the type of questions they are asking of their learners. When designing activities for learning, a taxonomy such as Bloom’s provides a framework that reminds of us how if we are to see learning taking place the types of thinking that needs to happen. What the Padagogy Wheel does is provide ideas to learners (and staff) the kinds of apps that can support the different kinds of thinking and learning across Blooms. As learners and teachers think about how they are going to undertake the activities they want to do, this wheel provides ideas of which apps on the iPad could be used to support them.

Smarter Learning John MacBeath Position/Status Emeritus Professor John MacBeath is Professor Emeritus at the University of Cambridge, Director of Leadership for Learning: the Cambridge Network and Projects Director for the Centre for Commonwealth Education. Until 2000 he was Director of the Quality in Education Centre at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. As well as his interest and research on leadership he worked for over a decade with schools, education authorities and national governments on school self-evaluation. Five books on self-evaluation have been addressed mainly to a teacher and senior management readership. He acted in a consultancy role to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), UNESCO and ILO (International Labour Organisation), the Bertelsmann Foundation, the Prince's Trust, the European Commission, the Scottish Executive, the Swiss Federal Government, the Varkey Group in Dubai (Emirates) and the Hong Kong Education Department.

G'day and greetings from South Australia: The latest Padagogy Wheel gathers Graduate Attributes, Motivation, Blooms Taxonomy, iPad Apps and finally the SAMR Model together in a helpful infographic. Have a look at the Version 3.0 Poster it puts it all on one diagram ( I have explained V3 on my blog post "The Padagogy Wheel V3.0: Learning Design starts with graduate attributes, capabilities and motivation" ( Jeff Dunn of Edudemic reviewed the Wheel at "Updated Padagogy Wheel Tackles The Problem Of Motivation In Education" (

However I think my latest blog post "Using The Padagogy Wheel: It’s All About Grey-matter Grids (GGs)" ( will be the most helpful to teachers. I would really appreciate feedback from any teacher who tries out these ideas. Do these concepts actually fly in anything from curriculum design through to facilitating a class online by allanadl Jun 13

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