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The Eight Pillars of Innovation

The Eight Pillars of Innovation
The greatest innovations are the ones we take for granted, like light bulbs, refrigeration and penicillin. But in a world where the miraculous very quickly becomes common-place, how can a company, especially one as big as Google, maintain a spirit of innovation year after year? Nurturing a culture that allows for innovation is the key. As we’ve grown to over 26,000 employees in more than 60 offices, we’ve worked hard to maintain the unique spirit that characterized Google way back when I joined as employee #16. At that time I was Head of Marketing (a group of one), and over the past decade I’ve been lucky enough to work on a wide range of products. Some were big wins, others weren’t. What’s different is that, even as we dream up what’s next, we face the classic innovator’s dilemma: should we invest in brand new products, or should we improve existing ones? Have a mission that matters Work can be more than a job when it stands for something you care about. Think big but start small

http://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/quarterly/innovation/8-pillars-of-innovation.html

Related:  Economy, Innovation, Startups, Crowdsourcing, Advertising, JobscreativityGeneral Professional Interest

4 Ways To Amplify Your Creativity The holidays are over, the weather is lousy, and we’re sober again. We made all kinds of New Year’s promises, but the big one that will change our careers, if not our lives, is the promise to ourselves to become more creative. In my new book, Creative Intelligence, I show that creativity is learned behavior that gets better with training--like sports. You can make creativity routine and a regular part of your life. That’s true for big companies as well as small startups, corporate managers as well as entrepreneurs.

We’re all marketers now - McKinsey Quarterly - Marketing & Sales - Strategy For the past decade, marketers have been adjusting to a new era of deep customer engagement. They’ve tacked on new functions, such as social-media management; altered processes to better integrate advertising campaigns online, on television, and in print; and added staff with Web expertise to manage the explosion of digital customer data. Yet in our experience, that’s not enough. To truly engage customers for whom “push” advertising is increasingly irrelevant, companies must do more outside the confines of the traditional marketing organization. Heather Sellers talks about requiring her students to turn in handwritten first drafts « The Digital Realist Heather Sellers is author of the critically acclaimed memoir You Don’t Look Like Anyone I Know, which tells the story of her lifelong struggle with face blindness, a neurological condition that prevents her from recognizing faces. She has also published poetry, a collection of short stories, a children’s book, and three books on the craft of writing. Her memoir brought her into the national spotlight in 2010, including appearances on Good Morning America and NPR, as well as being designated an editor’s choice in the New York Times and a book-of-the-month pick by the Oprah Magazine. With all her celebrity, Heather continues the good work of teaching writing at Hope College, where she has been a professor since 1995.

The Auteur Myth Randall Stross recently wrote an interesting piece in the Times extolling the virtues of the Apple design process by comparing it to Google’s engineer driven approach. According to Stross, who riffs on a well known talk by John Gruber, the success of Apple is a tribute to the auteur model of design: At Apple, one is the magic number.One person is the Decider for final design choices. Not focus groups. Not data crunchers. Not committee consensus-builders.

Oligopoly An oligopoly is a market form in which a market or industry is dominated by a small number of sellers (oligopolists). Oligopolies can result from various forms of collusion which reduce competition and lead to higher prices for consumers.[1] With few sellers, each oligopolist is likely to be aware of the actions of the others. The decisions of one firm therefore influence and are influenced by the decisions of other firms. 3 Paths Toward A More Creative Life Everyone can learn to be more creative, but to become very creative, I’ve come to believe you need to lead a creative life. In watching my best students, in examining the lives of successful entrepreneurs, and in seeing the process of the great Native American artists who I know, it is clear that how they live their daily lives is crucial to their success. I realize that it sounds very “zen-y” (which is OK by me), yet I come to this realization not through a search for spirituality or clarity but from simple observation. Creativity is in such demand today that when we apply for jobs, when we join organizations, or when we just meet other people, we are asked to present our creative selves.

Have you tested your strategy lately? - McKinsey Quarterly - Strategy - Strategic Thinking “What’s the next new thing in strategy?” a senior executive recently asked Phil Rosenzweig, a professor at IMD, in Switzerland. His response was surprising for someone whose career is devoted to advancing the state of the art of strategy: “With all respect, I think that’s the wrong question. The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them) Love cooking or hate it, much of your time in the kitchen is likely wasted by easily correctable mistakes you probably don't even know you're making. You waste time prepping ingredients, use your knives incorrectly, mix and match the wrong utensils, and throw out food that's still good—and those are just a few of the stupid things you do in the kitchen. Here's how to fix them. P Stupid Thing #1: You Spend Too Much Time Prepping IngredientsP

Related:  creativity