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Big Five personality traits

Big Five personality traits
In psychology, the Big Five personality traits are five broad domains or dimensions of personality that are used to describe human personality. The theory based on the Big Five factors is called the five-factor model (FFM).[1] The five factors are openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Acronyms commonly used to refer to the five traits collectively are OCEAN, NEOAC, or CANOE. Beneath each global factor, a cluster of correlated and more specific primary factors are found; for example, extraversion includes such related qualities as gregariousness, assertiveness, excitement seeking, warmth, activity, and positive emotions.[2]:24 The Big Five model is able to account for different traits in personality without overlapping. Empirical research has shown that the Big Five personality traits show consistency in interviews, self-descriptions and observations. §Five factors[edit] Openness to experience: (inventive/curious vs. consistent/cautious).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Five_personality_traits

Related:  personality typesPersonality DimensionsEgo, id and superegoDiscovering EGOPsychology and stuff

The iPersonic Personality Type Our free personality test is extrapolated from a typology which was originally developed by the psychoanalyst Carl Gustaf Jung and later differentiated by Isabel Meyers and Katherine Briggs. This typology is based on different temperaments and attitudes respectively that are widely held to be hereditary. They take influence on our perceptions, thought process, feelings and behavior. This typology is based on four opposite pairs of personality dimensions. These are:The Energy Dimension: Extraversion versus IntroversionThe Information Dimension: Sensing versus IntuitionThe Decision Dimension: Thinking versus FeelingThe Action Dimension: Perceiving versus Judging

Robert Hogan (psychologist) Robert Hogan (born 1937) is an American psychologist known for his innovations in personality testing, and is an international authority on personality assessment, leadership, and organizational effectiveness. Hogan earned a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley. He was McFarlin Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at The University of Tulsa for 17 years. Prior to that, Dr. Hogan was Professor of Psychology and Social Relations at Johns Hopkins University. He has received a number of research and teaching awards, and is president of Hogan Assessment Systems based in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Eysenck Personality Questionnaire In psychology, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) is a questionnaire to assess the personality traits of a person. It was devised by the psychologists Hans Jürgen Eysenck and his wife Sybil B. G. Eysenck.[1] Hans Eysenck's theory is based primarily on physiology and genetics.

Personality psychology Personality psychology is a branch of psychology that studies personality and its variation between individuals. Its areas of focus include: Construction of a coherent picture of the individual and his or her major psychological processesInvestigation of individual psychological differencesInvestigation of human nature and psychological similarities between individuals "Personality" is a dynamic and organized set of characteristics possessed by a person that uniquely influences his or her cognitions, emotions, motivations, and behaviors in various situations. The word "personality" originates from the Latin persona, which means mask. In the theatre of the ancient Latin-speaking world, the mask was not used as a plot device to disguise the identity of a character, but instead was a convention employed to represent or typify that character.

Oddly Developed Types A Few Caveats Please bear in mind that none of this has to be a stereotype that rules your life. You're a unique individual with a unique background, and this description is simply a generalization based on statistics and averages. Don't take what you read here as limitations, but as an invitation to grow outside your core strengths. And especially don't use this description as an excuse.

The Big Five Personality Test Take this psychology test to find out about your personality! This test measures what many psychologists consider to be the five fundamental dimensions of personality. Learn more about the Big Five by reading answers to commonly asked questions.Read our consent form, which explains the benefits of this free, anonymous test and your rights.There are no "right" or "wrong" answers, but note that you will not obtain meaningful results unless you answer the questions seriously.These results are being used in scientific research, so please try to give accurate answers.Your results will be displayed as soon as you submit your answers. This site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for counseling with a health care provider. Privacy Policy Made by Jeff Potter, (c) 2000, 2009, 2015 Atof Inc.

Framing (social sciences) In the social sciences, framing is a set of concepts and theoretical perspectives on how individuals, groups, and societies organize, perceive, and communicate about reality. Framing is the social construction of a social phenomenon often by mass media sources, political or social movements, political leaders, or other actors and organizations. It is an inevitable process of selective influence over the individual's perception of the meanings attributed to words or phrases. It is generally considered in one of two ways: as frames in thought, consisting of the mental representations, interpretations, and simplifications of reality, and frames in communication, consisting of the communication of frames between different actors.[1] The effects of framing can be seen in many journalism applications.

Ego It may also refer to: In media and entertainment[edit] Ego the Living Planet, a character in the Marvel Comics universePlanet Eclipse Ego, a paintball marker produced by Planet EclipseEgo (a programming term, referring to the protagonist in an adventure game)[citation needed] In music[edit] In Other Uses[edit] EGO[edit] Sigmund Freud Sigmund Freud (/frɔɪd/;[2] German pronunciation: [ˈziːkmʊnt ˈfʁɔʏ̯t]; born Sigismund Schlomo Freud; 6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist, now known as the father of psychoanalysis. Freud qualified as a doctor of medicine at the University of Vienna in 1881,[3] and then carried out research into cerebral palsy, aphasia and microscopic neuroanatomy at the Vienna General Hospital.[4] Upon completing his habilitation in 1895, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology in the same year and became an affiliated professor (professor extraordinarius) in 1902.[5][6] Psychoanalysis remains influential within psychotherapy, within some areas of psychiatry, and across the humanities. As such, it continues to generate extensive and highly contested debate with regard to its therapeutic efficacy, its scientific status, and whether it advances or is detrimental to the feminist cause.[10] Nonetheless, Freud's work has suffused contemporary Western thought and popular culture.

INFP Personal Growth INFPs are creative, sensitive souls who take their lives very seriously. They seek harmony and authenticity in their relationships with others. They value creativity, spirituality, and honoring the individual self above all else.

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