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The Sixteen Personality Types - High-Level

The Sixteen Personality Types - High-Level
ISTJ - The Duty Fulfiller Serious and quiet, interested in security and peaceful living. Extremely thorough, responsible, and dependable. Well-developed powers of concentration. Usually interested in supporting and promoting traditions and establishments. Well-organized and hard working, they work steadily towards identified goals. Click here for a detailed description of ISTJ. ISTP - The Mechanic Quiet and reserved, interested in how and why things work. Click here for a detailed description of ISTP. ISFJ - The Nurturer Quiet, kind, and conscientious. Click here for a detailed description of ISFJ. ISFP - The Artist Quiet, serious, sensitive and kind. Click here for a detailed description of ISFP. INFJ - The Protector Quietly forceful, original, and sensitive. Click here for a detailed description of INFJ. INFP - The Idealist Quiet, reflective, and idealistic. Click here for a detailed description of INFP. INTJ - The Scientist Independent, original, analytical, and determined.

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Write Better: 3 Ways To Introduce Your Main CharacterWritersDigest.com One of the biggest bugaboos in manuscript submissions is when the author doesn’t properly introduce the protagonist within the first chapter. Readers want to know quickly the protagonist’s sex, age and level of sophistication in the world of the story, and they want to relate to the character on an emotional level. Readers’ interest in the protagonist has to be earned, in other words.

PersonalityZone - Temperament and Your Career Finding Your Passion or What Makes a Job Right for You? Rationals - Finding Knowledge and Competence In this five-part series, we're examining each personality type and job fit. 100 Things Personality Test - VisualDNA VisualDNA brings a new layer of information to the world of technology that will help bring it closer to the people who use it – making it more enjoyable and relevant. Technology provides businesses with a surfeit of DATA – what and when. However it provides very little in the way of UNDERSTANDING – who did things, and why they did them. Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals « SENG Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals by James T. Webb

Antisocial Personality Disorder Symptoms Antisocial personality disorder is characterized by a long-standing pattern of a disregard for other people’s rights, often crossing the line and violating those rights. It usually begins in childhood or as a teen and continues into their adult lives. Antisocial personality disorder is often referred to as psychopathy or sociopathy in popular culture. However, neither psychopathy nor sociopathy are recognized professional labels used for diagnosis. Individuals with Antisocial Personality Disorder frequently lack empathy and tend to be callous, cynical, and contemptuous of the feelings, rights, and sufferings of others. They may have an inflated and arrogant self-appraisal (e.g., feel that ordinary work is beneath them or lack a realistic concern about their current problems or their future) and may be excessively opinionated, self-assured, or cocky.

Demons A to Z - Weird Encyclopedia A list of demons, devils, and evil gods from around the world. Probably not exhaustive. If you know of any more, keep it to yourself. The iPersonic Personality Type Our free personality test is extrapolated from a typology which was originally developed by the psychoanalyst Carl Gustaf Jung and later differentiated by Isabel Meyers and Katherine Briggs. This typology is based on different temperaments and attitudes respectively that are widely held to be hereditary. They take influence on our perceptions, thought process, feelings and behavior. This typology is based on four opposite pairs of personality dimensions. These are:The Energy Dimension: Extraversion versus IntroversionThe Information Dimension: Sensing versus IntuitionThe Decision Dimension: Thinking versus FeelingThe Action Dimension: Perceiving versus Judging

The Personality Project Welcome The personality-project is a collection of web pages devoted to the academic study of personality. It is meant to guide the interested student, researcher or serious layperson to recent developments in the field of personality research. Personality Types Members Login Log in to your account below: Enter your e-mail address to receive a reset link. Forgot password? Not a member yet? Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) : DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria What is a personality disorder? A personality disorder is a pattern of deviant or abnormal behavior that the person doesn't change even though it causes emotional upsets and trouble with other people at work and in personal relationships. It is not limited to episodes of mental illness, and it is not caused by drug or alcohol use, head injury, or illness. There are about a dozen different behavior patterns classified as personality disorders by DSM-IV. All the personality disorders show up as deviations from normal in one or more of the following: (1) cognition -- i.e., perception, thinking, and interpretation of oneself, other people, and events; (2) affectivity -- i.e., emotional responses (range, intensity, lability, appropriateness); (3) interpersonal functions; (4) impulsivity.

Dream Dictionary The significance of dreams has probably been debated since people first developed the ability to communicate. Despite this, there's still no agreement on why we dream. It's hard to believe that dreams have no meaning at all, though, especially when it's so much fun to try to figure out what they're trying to tell us. Big Five personality traits In psychology, the Big Five personality traits are five broad domains or dimensions of personality that are used to describe human personality. The theory based on the Big Five factors is called the five-factor model (FFM).[1] The five factors are openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Acronyms commonly used to refer to the five traits collectively are OCEAN, NEOAC, or CANOE. Beneath each global factor, a cluster of correlated and more specific primary factors are found; for example, extraversion includes such related qualities as gregariousness, assertiveness, excitement seeking, warmth, activity, and positive emotions.[2]:24

Character Strengths and Virtues The strengths and virtues[edit] CSV defined character strengths as satisfying most of the ten following criteria. Character strengths are The key points of the theory of positive disintegration. Return to Main page. -- Developed by Kazimierz Dabrowski (1902-1980), a Polish psychologist and psychiatrist. -- As a youth, Dabrowski was affected by his experience of the aftermath of battle in World War I.

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