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Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler
Johannes Kepler (German: [ˈkʰɛplɐ]; December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion, based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton's theory of universal gravitation. During his career, Kepler was a mathematics teacher at a seminary school in Graz, Austria, where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg. Later he became an assistant to astronomer Tycho Brahe, and eventually the imperial mathematician to Emperor Rudolf II and his two successors Matthias and Ferdinand II. He was also a mathematics teacher in Linz, Austria, and an adviser to General Wallenstein. Early years[edit] Birthplace of Johannes Kepler in Weil der Stadt Graz (1594–1600)[edit] Mysterium Cosmographicum[edit] Close-up of inner section of the model

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Kepler

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Resonance In physics, resonance is the tendency of a system to oscillate with greater amplitude at some frequencies than at others. Frequencies at which the response amplitude is a relative maximum are known as the system's resonant frequencies, or resonance frequencies. At these frequencies, even small periodic driving forces can produce large amplitude oscillations, because the system stores vibrational energy. Great conjunction A Great Conjunction is a conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn.[Note 1] The last Great Conjunction took place on May 31, 2000, while the next one will be in late December 2020. Great Conjunctions take place regularly, every 18–20 years, as a result of the combined ~12-year orbital period of Jupiter around the Sun, and Saturn's ~30-year orbital period.

Alhazen In medieval Europe, he was honored as Ptolemaeus Secundus ("Ptolemy the Second")[10] or simply called "The Physicist".[11] He is also sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري) after Basra, his birthplace.[12] He spent most of his life close to the court of the Caliphate in Cairo and earned his living authoring various treatises and tutoring members of the nobilities.[13] Overview[edit] Biography[edit] Born c. 965 in Basra, which was then part of the Buyid emirate,[1] to an Arab family.[14][15] Legacy[edit]

Pentagonal antiprism In geometry, the pentagonal antiprism is the third in an infinite set of antiprisms formed by an even-numbered sequence of triangle sides closed by two polygon caps. It consists of two pentagons joined to each other by a ring of 10 triangles for a total of 12 faces. Hence, it is a non-regular dodecahedron. Geometry[edit] If the faces of the pentagonal antiprism are all regular, it is a semiregular polyhedron. It can also be considered as a parabidiminished icosahedron, a shape formed by removing two pentagonal pyramids from a regular icosahedron leaving two nonadjacent pentagonal faces; a related shape, the metabidiminished icosahedron (one of the Johnson solids), is likewise form from the icosahedron by removing two pyramids, but its pentagonal faces are adjacent to each other.

Galileo Galilei Galileo Galilei (Italian pronunciation: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564[3] – 8 January 1642), often known mononymously as Galileo, was an Italian physicist, mathematician, engineer, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the scientific revolution during the Renaissance. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism. Galileo has been called the "father of modern observational astronomy",[4] the "father of modern physics",[5][6] the "father of science",[6][7] and "the father of modern science".[8] William Herbert Sheldon William Herbert Sheldon, Jr. (November 19, 1898 - September 17, 1977) was an American psychologist and numismatist. He created the field of somatotype and constitutional psychology that tried to correlate body types with behavior, intelligence and social hierarchy through his Ivy League nude posture photos.[1] However, his work is generally dismissed by modern researchers.[2]

Nibiru (Babylonian astronomy) Nibiru (also transliterated Neberu, Nebiru) is a term in the Akkadian language, translating to "crossing" or "point of transition", especially of rivers,[1] i.e. river crossings or ferry-boats. In Babylonian astronomy, Nibiru (in cuneiform spelled dné-bé-ru or MULni-bi-rum) is a term of the highest point of the ecliptic, i.e. the point of summer solstice, and its associated constellation. As the highest point in the paths of the planets, Nibiru was considered the seat of the summus deus who pastures the stars like sheep, in Babylon identified with Marduk. The establishment of the nibiru point is described in tablet 5 of the creation epic Enûma Eliš; “When Marduk fixed the locations (manzazu) of Nibiru, Enlil and Ea in the sky".[2] The Enuma Elish states:

Dual polyhedron The dual of a cube is an octahedron, shown here with vertices at the cube face centers. Duality is closely related to reciprocity or polarity. Kinds of duality[edit] There are many kinds of duality. The kinds most relevant to elementary polyhedra are: Nuremberg Castle Nuremberg Castle - Sinwell Tower in the middle left, Luginsland Tower in the far right part of the picture Nuremberg Castle (German: Nürnberger Burg) is a historical building on a sandstone rock in the north of the historical city of Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany. It comprises three sections: the Imperial castle ("Kaiserburg"), some buildings of the Burgraves of Nuremberg ("Burggrafenburg"), and the municipal buildings of the Imperial City at the eastern site ("Reichsstädtische Bauten"). The castle together with the City walls of Nuremberg is meant to be one of Europes most considerable medieval war systems.[1] History[edit] The courtyard with Heidenturm (Heathen Tower), Kaiserkapelle (Emperor's Chapel) and Tiefer Brunnen (Deep Well).

Ernst Kretschmer Ernst Kretschmer, Dr. med. Dr. phil. h.c. (October 8, 1888 – February 8, 1964), was a German psychiatrist who researched the human constitution and established a typology. Life[edit]

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