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Using Photos With English-Language Learners

Using Photos With English-Language Learners
"A picture is worth a thousand words." -- Unknown Though the origin of this popular adage is unclear, one thing is clear: using photos with English-Language Learners (ELLs) can be enormously effective in helping them learn far more than a thousand words -- and how to use them. Usable images for lessons can be found online or teachers and students can take and use their own. The activities presented below connect to multiple Common Core Standards including the following ELA Standards: Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. Picture Word Inductive Model The Picture Word Inductive Model (PWIM) is one of our favorites. Research has shown that it is an effective way for students to learn to develop vocabulary and to read. Thought Bubbles Picture Dictation Bloom's Taxonomy Image Detective

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/ell-engagment-using-photos

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Werff- Using Pictures from Magazines in ESL Classes The Internet TESL Journal Joep van der Werffjoepvdw [at] yahoo.comInterlingua (Mexico City, Mexico) The purpose of this article is to show that pictures from magazines are a source of varied classroom activities in the areas of speaking, listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar. I'll give tips on how to collect and sort suitable pictures and I'll include several sample activities. Teachers can use the activities as they are presented, or adapt them to fit their needs.

How English language teachers can use pictures in class Larissa Albano, winner of our monthly Teaching English blog award Opens in a new tab or window., is an English teacher based in Italy who blogs at larissaslanguages.blogspot.com Opens in a new tab or window.. She explains how using pictures as a teaching aid can help language teachers engage their students. If I say 'picture', what do you think about? I guess the words 'drawing', 'photo', 'painting', and 'film' might come to mind. Learning Gets Personal Have you developed a Personalized Learning Mindset? Several months ago, I read this blog post by Anthony Kim, founder of Education Elements, and the article really resonated with me. I saw that, without even realizing it, I had been working for a year to help the staff at my school develop what he calls a personalized learning mindset.

Using Picture Books to Teach Characterization in Writing Workshop ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Guides Need help with using still images, sound and video for educational purposes? Explore our free digital media guides. They will take you through the process of finding, creating, managing, delivering and using digital media. The guides have been written specifically for teachers, learners and researchers working in higher education, further education and skills. They are also useful for people working in galleries, libraries, archives and museums. Creating

The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit I have been thinking about some "new" items I could add to my original Digital Citizenship Kit that I created last year. Like I said in that blog post, I love using props when teaching. After some great conversations with the good wife @jenbadura on what I should include, I have come up with some new items to include in the survival kit. Yes, you can use this with your students! After I blogged about the original kit, I had a plethora of teachers email me or send me a tweet me asking if it was okay to use this idea at their school. Please do!

Guide... This list provides examples of ways in which digital images can be used in teaching and learning materials. It has been put together to inspire lecturers new to using digital images: however it is not comprehensive! The list does not differentiate between types of image e.g. photographic, vector, chart or graph. So in looking at the examples below, some thought has to be given to the subject area and pedagogy: the appropriate use of the images within teaching and learning materials and the appropriate 'type' of image to represent the concept. To illustrate concepts and to show examples of what you are talking about during a lecture when you can't visit the real thing (e.g. building site practices; 3D model of Roman villa) or see the item (e.g. chemical model)

Teaching with Visuals: Students Respond to Images Dan Meyer knows that textbook-driven teaching hasn't served his students well. That's why they wind up taking remedial algebra with him in ninth grade. "They either need more time on content, or they've really been burned by traditional math instruction," says the teacher from San Lorenzo Valley High School, near Santa Cruz, California. For Meyer, now in his fifth year of teaching, a lightbulb moment happened three years ago when he acquired a projector for his classroom. "That gave me a way to put up a full-screen image really fast," he explains. "I could toss up visuals cheaply and quickly."

The Digital Citizenship Survival Kit It's a simple little prop I use when teaching Digital Citizenship to our K-8 #aurorahuskies students. I love utilizing props to try to get my point across to students. To me, it helps a student retain the lesson better. Let me introduce you to Mr.

Using Visual Materials as Historical Sources: A model for Studying State and Local History Using Visual Materials as Historical Sources: A model for Studying State and Local History The Social Studies, March/April 1990, pp 84-87 A Questioning Model for Using Historical Photographs

Interpreting Political Cartoons in the History Classroom What Is It? A lesson that introduces a framework for understanding and interpreting political cartoons that can be used throughout your entire history course. Rationale Political cartoons are vivid primary sources that offer intriguing and entertaining insights into the public mood, the underlying cultural assumptions of an age, and attitudes toward key events or trends of the times. Why It’s Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill By Warren Berger Friday March 14 is the 135th anniversary of Albert Einstein’s birthday, a good time to think about the importance of asking questions. This was a big theme for Einstein, who told us, “The important thing is not to stop questioning,” while also urging us to question everything and “Never lose a holy curiosity.” Einstein understood that questioning is critical to learning and solving problems.

Using Pictures to Build Schema for Social Studies Content ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More

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