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Using Photos With English-Language Learners

Using Photos With English-Language Learners
"A picture is worth a thousand words." -- Unknown Though the origin of this popular adage is unclear, one thing is clear: using photos with English-Language Learners (ELLs) can be enormously effective in helping them learn far more than a thousand words -- and how to use them. Usable images for lessons can be found online or teachers and students can take and use their own. The activities presented below connect to multiple Common Core Standards including the following ELA Standards: Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Picture Word Inductive Model The Picture Word Inductive Model (PWIM) is one of our favorites. The PWIM uses an inductive process (in which students seek patterns and use them to identify their broader meanings and significance), as opposed to a deductive process (where meanings or rules are given, and students have to then apply them). Thought Bubbles Picture Dictation Bloom's Taxonomy Related:  Visual Literacy in the Classroom

Werff- Using Pictures from Magazines in ESL Classes The Internet TESL Journal Joep van der Werffjoepvdw [at] yahoo.comInterlingua (Mexico City, Mexico) The purpose of this article is to show that pictures from magazines are a source of varied classroom activities in the areas of speaking, listening, writing, vocabulary and grammar. I'll give tips on how to collect and sort suitable pictures and I'll include several sample activities. Teachers can use the activities as they are presented, or adapt them to fit their needs. Introduction Several years ago I was teaching a beginning level class. This experience convinced me that visuals, especially 'unusual' pictures, foster students' imagination, which in turn motivates them to use English. Preparation Choosing Pictures Pictures are illustrations that are cut from a magazine, newspapers or other sources. Collecting the pictures Students like colorful and varied materials. Sorting the Pictures Sample Activities Below, I'll describe nine activities that can be done with magazine cutouts. Grammar

Strategies for Teachers Upon completion of this section, you will Acquire general recommendations for the classroom that enrich learning for beginning readers and writers Identify tips for the different parts of the reading process that enrich comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary Have ideas to use when teaching children with visual deficits Sparking new ideas for your classroom Malcolm Alexander, the acclaimed dyslexic sculptor, tells a story about one of his teachers who made a difference. According to Malcolm, that teacher said, "When I teach, when I look at a student's work, I always try to find something nice in it. And then go into the rest of it." This is a gift you can give all students, but particularly those who are dyslexic: find something positive, something they have done well, and acknowledge it. As a teacher, you most likely already have a print-rich environment in your classroom. The following suggestions may spark a new idea for your classroom. General recommendations Before reading Oral reading

Using Picture Books to Teach Characterization in Writing Workshop ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice Students explore the concept of character development through focused experiences with picture books. back to top Picture Books that Illustrate Well-Developed Characters: This booklist offers a list of picture books that feature well-developed characters. Story Map: Use this online tool to analyze a story's characters, plots, and settings. Further Reading Ray, Katie Wood. 1999.

Epic! - Books for Kids Guide... This list provides examples of ways in which digital images can be used in teaching and learning materials. It has been put together to inspire lecturers new to using digital images: however it is not comprehensive! The list does not differentiate between types of image e.g. photographic, vector, chart or graph. So in looking at the examples below, some thought has to be given to the subject area and pedagogy: the appropriate use of the images within teaching and learning materials and the appropriate 'type' of image to represent the concept. To illustrate concepts and to show examples of what you are talking about during a lecture when you can't visit the real thing (e.g. building site practices; 3D model of Roman villa) or see the item (e.g. chemical model) Drawing of a cross found at Peakirk, Sir Henry Dryden Collection via VADS Arkansas Archeological Society dig at Jones Mill by Farther Along on Flickr. To assess students' knowledge, understanding and observational skills (e.g.

Using Visual Materials as Historical Sources: A model for Studying State and Local History Using Visual Materials as Historical Sources: A model for Studying State and Local History The Social Studies, March/April 1990, pp 84-87 A Questioning Model for Using Historical Photographs Sample Lesson #1: Sugar Cane Syrup Making in Florida Sample Lesson #2: Migrant Workers in Florida during the Depression Further Reading "A picture is worth a thousand words." Too often, the use of pictures in social studies is confined to illustrating textbooks. The way to overcome these deficiencies of the textbooks' captioned photography is to select rich, high-interest pictures and use them as raw historical source materials. Once the teacher has selected a picture appropriate to the historical topic or era under study, he or she introduces the picture and displays it for student reflection. A Questioning Model for Using Historical Photographs The best kinds of questions for analyzing a historical engraving, painting, or photograph are narrowly focused questions. FIGURE 1 — Questioning Model Allen, R.

Using Pictures to Build Schema for Social Studies Content ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice Looking to help students practice "reading" images for a variety of contextual meanings while engaging in content area study? back to top Anticipation Guide: Boston Massacre: Have students use this printout to determine what they know about the Boston Massacre, propaganda, and reactions to the massacre. Villano, T.L. (2005). Meaning is communicated by illustrations in texts.

Using Historical Photographs in Teaching - History and Using Photographs in Teaching Period photographs, along with other primary source documents, are engaging yet deceptive historical tools that should become an important part of any educational experience if available. Two important points, however, need to be considered when using these historical documents. Dates must be established. If the date of a photograph is not known it can be difficult if not impossible to understand exactly what has occurred. Historical Photographs: A Critical Evaluation Both of these issues are dealt with when one takes a 'critical' look before making a judgment of a photograph or document. To give you an example of this technique, look at this picture of Civil War weapons. Ways to Integrate Historical Photos into the Classroom Historical photos are not only good for reinforcing critical thinking skills, but they can also be used as a jumping off point for other assignments. Many more ideas will present themselves to you over time.

Social Studies Hofer, M., & Swan, K. O. (2005). Digital image manipulation: A compelling means to engage students in discussion of point of view and perspective. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education [Online serial], 5(3/4). Digital Image Manipulation: A Compelling Means to Engage Students in Discussion of Point of View and Perspective Mark Hofer College of William & Mary and Kathleen Owings Swan University of Kentucky Abstract With the importance of imagery in our culture and the increasing access to both digital images and the tools used to manipulate them, it is important that social studies teacher educators prepare preservice teachers to provide their students with opportunities to develop a critical lens through which to view images. In her 1977 book, On Photography, essayist Susan Sontag wrote, “In America, the photographer is not simply the person who records the past, but the one who invents it.” Photo Manipulation, Past and Present Table 1. During the 2004 U.S. Figure 8.

A Pictures Worth A Picture’s Worth Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades Keith C. A picture can be worth a thousand words—and maybe a lot more. “What do you think is going on in this old picture? Students strain to get a better view. The teacher records these contributions on the board under two headings: What people are doing and Why we think so. “Those are good suggestions, and you’ve done a good job of giving reasons for your ideas. The Basics of Authentic Instruction In recent years, educators have stressed the need to engage students in authentic tasks—those that resemble the challenges people face outside of school, whether as professionals, consumers, family members, or citizens.1 In the teaching of history, authentic instruction involves students directly in the analysis and interpretation of historical information. What Children Bring to the Classroom Analyzing photographs, however, also calls for skills that children rarely develop without explicit instruction and practice. 1.

Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Go to the blog Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS. Using Primary Sources Discover quick and easy ways to begin using primary sources in your classroom, with teachers' guides, information on citing sources and copyright, and the Library's primary source analysis tool. TPS Partners The Teaching with Primary Sources Program builds partnerships with educational organizations to support effective instruction using primary sources. The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal

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