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EconPapers

EconPapers
<p><span><b>EconPapers has moved to http://EconPapers.repec.org! Please update your bookmarks.</b></span></p> EconPapers provides access to RePEc, the world's largest collection of on-line Economics working papers, journal articles and software. We have: 558,689 Working Papers (492,538 downloadable) in 3,866 series 935,251 Journal Articles (869,757 downloadable) in 1,930 journals 3,191 Software Items (3,178 downloadable) in 28 series 17,819 Books (8,101 downloadable) in 296 series 19,200 Chapters (17,627 downloadable) in 132 series 39,897 Authors and 10,366 individuals have registered in the RePEc Author Service for a total of 1,534,150 searchable working papers, articles and software items with 1,391,201 items available on-line.

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BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engine): Hit List Loading Error: Cannot Load Popup Box Mobile | A A A | Economic Data freely available online Compiled by John Sloman, Economics Network Last updated 12th April 2014 Here are some links that you may find useful for accessing statistics and other information. Datasets that require you to pay or register are on a separate page along with pointers. (Note that some free datasets that require registration are also listed below.) Printing out this page If you print out this page, the URLs will appear alongside each individual link.

John Kenneth Galbraith John Kenneth "Ken" Galbraith, OC (properly /ɡælˈbreɪθ/ gal-BRAYTH, but commonly /ˈɡælbreɪθ/ GAL-brayth; 15 October 1908 – 29 April 2006) was a Canadian and, later, American economist, public official, and diplomat, and a leading proponent of 20th-century American liberalism. His books on economic topics were bestsellers from the 1950s through the 2000s, during which time Galbraith fulfilled the role of public intellectual. In macro-economical terms he was a Keynesian and an institutionalist.[2] Galbraith was a long-time Harvard faculty member and stayed with Harvard University for half a century as a professor of economics.[3] He was a prolific author and wrote four dozen books, including several novels, and published more than a thousand articles and essays on various subjects.

Economics Roundtable January 2014 Payroll Employment We are getting closer to the previous peak. Click on the image to get a bigger version. Jobs The best summary of the state of our economy is the graph (below) of employment as a fraction of population for people over 16 years old. The decrease is large, but the most troubling feature of the graph is the flat trend . Franco Modigliani Franco Modigliani (Italian: [ˈfraŋko modiʎˈʎani]; June 18, 1918 – September 25, 2003) was an Italian economist naturalized American, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and MIT Department of Economics who won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1985. Life and career[edit] Born in Rome, Modigliani left Italy in 1939 because of his Jewish origin and antifascist views.

Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, Centenary Professor at the London School of Economics, Distinguished Scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center at the CUNY Graduate Center, and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times.[2][3] In 2008, Krugman won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography. According to the prize Committee, the prize was given for Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic concentration of wealth, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services. Krugman is known in academia for his work on international economics (including trade theory, economic geography, and international finance),[5][6] liquidity traps, and currency crises.

Paul Samuelson Paul Anthony Samuelson (May 15, 1915 – December 13, 2009) was an American economist, and the first American to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Swedish Royal Academies stated, when awarding the prize, that he "has done more than any other contemporary economist to raise the level of scientific analysis in economic theory".[1] Economic historian Randall E. Parker calls him the "Father of Modern Economics",[2] and The New York Times considered him to be the "foremost academic economist of the 20th century".[3] He entered the University of Chicago at age 16, during the depths of the Great Depression, and received his PhD in economics from Harvard.

Joseph Stiglitz Joseph Eugene Stiglitz, ForMemRS, FBA (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2001) and the John Bates Clark Medal (1979). He is a former senior vice president and chief economist of the World Bank, and is a former member, and Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.[2][3] He is known for his critical view of the management of globalization, free-market economists (whom he calls "free market fundamentalists"), and some international institutions like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Kanaal van jodiecongirl Upload economistsdoitwithmodels.com Subscription preferences Loading... Working... jodiecongirl How To Make Companies Think Long-Term - Roger Martin by Roger Martin | 12:12 PM October 3, 2011 This blog post is part of the HBR Online Forum The CEO’s Role in Fixing the System. In my latest book, Fixing the Game: Bubbles, Crashes, and What Capitalism can Learn from the NFL, I wrote about the negative impact of executive stock-based compensation on corporate short-termism. Eliminating stock-based compensation would help reduce the incentive for executive leadership to focus on the short term. CEOs Must Model the Behavior for Creating Societal Value - Roger Martin by Roger Martin | 2:22 PM September 26, 2011 This blog post is part of the HBR Online Forum The CEO’s Role in Fixing the System. CEOs can use both signals and systems as powerful levers in tilting the focus of their company toward long-term societal value creation — which will take care of their shareholders perfectly well.

Case Study: Can Nice Guys Finish First? - Jeffrey Pfeffer Editors’ Note: This fictionalized case study will appear in a forthcoming issue of Harvard Business Review, along with commentary from experts and readers. If you’d like your comment to be considered for publication, please be sure to include your full name, company or university affiliation, and email address. Adam Baker had been bothered all day by the blunt message his boss and mentor, Merwyn Straus, had delivered to him on the phone that morning: Adam was not the right guy to lead their company’s latest venture. “That door isn’t open to you” was how Merwyn had put it. It was one of those comments that sting a bit at first but inflict much more pain as time passes.

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