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Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation
What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that permit you to seek resolutions to questions and issues while you construct new knowledge. "Inquiry" is defined as "a seeking for truth, information, or knowledge -- seeking information by questioning." A Context for Inquiry Unfortunately, our traditional educational system has worked in a way that discourages the natural process of inquiry. Some of the discouragement of our natural inquiry process may come from a lack of understanding about the deeper nature of inquiry-based learning. Importance of Inquiry Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today's world. The Application of Inquiry

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Related:  Inquiry based learning & teachingEducational ModelsChange The Questions: From Your Heart! [Inquiry Mind-set]CurriculumIL

The Inquiry Page Based on John Dewey's philosophy that education begins with the curiosity of the learner, we use a spiral path of inquiry: asking questions, investigating solutions, creating new knowledge as we gather information, discussing our discoveries and experiences, and reflecting on our new-found knowledge. Each step in this process naturally leads to the next: inspiring new questions, investigations, and opportunities for authentic "teachable moments." The Skills Gap: America's Young Workers Are Lagging Behind New findings suggest that U.S. millennials are far less competent than their peers in Europe and Asia. Young American workers today are more educated than ever before, but the nation’s largest generation is losing its edge against the least and most educated of other countries, according to a provocative new report. The report’s authors warn these findings portend a growing gap between rich and poor American workers and that the lackluster results threaten U.S. competitiveness in an increasingly globalized market. The report, produced by testing giant ETS, analyzes data collected by the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality.

Stormwater Curriculum Units - Sustainability Ambassadors Tahoma School District - Sustainability Education Curriculum Units The Tahoma School District has developed stormwater related curriculum units at multiple grade levels. These units are available for free digital download on the Tahoma School District website. Puget Sound Communities – Grade 3 INQUIRY: How can we contribute to preserving and protecting our local ecology while practicing the skills of community contributors? Virtual Information Inquiry: Information Inquiry In inquiry-based learning environments, students are engaged in activities that help them actively pose questions, investigate, solve problems, and draw conclusions about the world around them. As independent thinkers, children become researchers, writers, videographers, and activists rather than passive receivers of a textbook's content. They do meaningful work that addresses essential questions and important standards. It's critical that learners take ownership of the inquiry process.

Earlychildhood NEWS - Article Reading Center Some people think of science as learning facts about the world around us. Others think of science and other ways of knowing as “the having of wonderful ideas” (Duckworth, 1987). This latter view of science and ways of knowing match the characteristics of young children as learners. Young children are naturally curious and passionate about learning (Raffini, 1993). In their pursuit of knowledge, they’re prone to poking, pulling, tasting, pounding, shaking, and experimenting. “From birth, children want to learn and they naturally seek out problems to solve” (Lind, 1999, p. 79). MOOCs Aren’t Revolutionizing College, but They’re Not a Failure A few years ago, the most enthusiastic advocates of MOOCs believed that these “massive open online courses” stood poised to overturn the century-old model of higher education. Their interactive technology promised to deliver top-tier teaching from institutions like Harvard, Stanford, and MIT, not just to a few hundred students in a lecture hall on ivy-draped campuses, but free via the Internet to thousands or even millions around the world. At long last, there appeared to be a solution to the problem of “scaling up” higher education: if it were delivered more efficiently, the relentless cost increases might finally be rolled back.

About Marilee Adams « Inquiry Institute About > About Marilee Adams Marilee Adams, Ph.D., is an author, executive coach, facilitator, and professional speaker. She is president and founder of the Inquiry Institute, a consulting, coaching, and educational organization and the originator of the QUESTION THINKING™ methodologies. Marilee is the author of Teaching That Changes Lives: 12 Mindset Tools for Igniting the Love of Learning, her latest book about cultivating the Learner Mindset for breakthroughs in schools, and Change Your Questions, Change Your Life: 10 Powerful Tools for Life and Work, a best-selling business and relationship fable about an executive coach and inquiring leadership. She also authored a textbook, The Art of the Question: A Guide to Short-Term Question-Centered Therapy. She wrote a chapter for Action Learning and Its Applications, Present and Future and coauthored, with Drs.

LID Manual for Schools - Sustainability Ambassadors LID Technical Assistance for Student Engineers Sustainability Ambassadors created the Stormwater Master Campus Planning Manual for schools as a curriculum-based engineering, science and policy guide for how to construct and maintain green infrastructure and other Low Impact Develop techniques on school property. It was developed in collaboration with Cascade Design Collaborative with Funding support from the Tahoma School District and the State Farm Youth Advisory Board. Adapted from the LID Technical Guidance Manual for Puget Sound developed by the WSU Puyallup Stormwater Research Center and the Puget Sound Partnership, the manual is designed in modular units for replication in other cities and school districts. Explore the chapters below.

The Keys to Inquiry: Introduction "We learn best when we learn from our own experiences." "Children need to be active learners, seeking answers to questions that they care about.""Science should be hands-on and minds-on so that children make sense of what they experience." Introduction 1. Students learn isolated skills and knowledge, starting with the simple building blocks of a particular topic and then building to more complex ideas. While this appeals to common sense (think of the efficiency of a automobile assembly line), the problem with this approach is the removal of any context to the learning, making deep understanding of the content less likely. Perkins calls this approach elementitis, where learning is structured exclusively around disconnected skills and fragmented pieces of information.

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