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Questioning – Top Ten Strategies

Questioning – Top Ten Strategies
“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein Questioning is the very cornerstone of philosophy and education, ever since Socrates ( in our Western tradition) decided to annoy pretty much everyone by critiquing and harrying people with questions – it has been central to our development of thinking and our capacity to learn. Indeed, it is so integral to all that we do that it is often overlooked when developing pedagogy – but it as crucial to teaching as air is to breathing. We must ask: do we need to give questioning the thought and planning time something so essential to learning obviously deserves? Most research indicates that as much as 80% of classroom questioning is based on low order, factual recall questions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Q1. I like to exemplify the probing nature of Socratic questioning with the attack dog of relentless questions – Jeremy Paxman – and his logical stripping down of Michael Howard! 6. Related:  PBL and Global Inquiry

20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”. Consider collaboration in recent history: Watson and Crick or Page and Brin (Founders of Google). Yes, those two were of course Bill Gates and Paul Allen, the founders of Microsoft. Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually. Groups tend to learn through “discussion, clarification of ideas, and evaluation of other’s ideas.” Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer times than students working individually. Many consider Vygotsky the father of “social learning”. What are some ways to include best practices for collaborative learning in our classroom? 1. 2. 3. 4. Successful interpersonal communication must exist in teams. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Peer marking and how to make it work in your classroom - TES English - Blog - TES English English and media teacher Ms Findlater explains the process of introducing peer marking to her pupils. Effective marking is essential. So, too, are time-saving strategies. How can we juggle the two? We want it done well but we can't, and shouldn’t, undertake detailed marking on every piece of work a student produces. So, how about a strategy that both reduces the mark load and enables students to take charge of their own learning? As a new teacher, I remember ‘doing’ peer marking with a year 9 class a few times. This would, indeed, have been the case at that time. Don't dumb it down Prior to the peer marking task being completed by the students, a copy of the success criteria/mark scheme is shared with them, the same one that I’m expected to use. Show me the skills Students highlight three key words at every level that helps them remember what they’re being asked to assess. Moving on up The students underline the word that describes the level of difficulty within each grade description.

Going SOLO: An introduction to the taxonomy everyone’s talking about This article originally appeared in Innovate My School's September 2012 digital magazine. The Structure of Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) taxonomy aims to show pupils how to develop sophisticated responses to questions by getting them to examine their thought-process as their understanding of a topic improves. I began using SOLO in 2011, and it is now integral to my teaching. SOLO defines five stages of understanding for any topic: prestructural, unistructural, multistructural, relational and extended abstract. The first three involve gathering relevant information. The other two are about using that information: linking facts and findings, questioning existing ideas about the topic, and forming new theories. All well and good. SOLO LEVEL: PRESTRUCTURAL (the pupil has missed the point) PUPIL RESPONSE:I think Johnny Depp is a Shakespeare character because we watched a film featuring both of them. TO MOVE ON:The pupil must begin to gather basic information on the topic. Implementing SOLO

Empower Their Voice cc licensed ( BY SD ) flickr photo shared by HowardLake It seems that serendipitously, if you are continuing to read blogs, some ideas that may be floating around in my head are made clearer by reading what others wrote. In many of my conversations with educators and students, we have talked about empowering students to have a voice in not only learning, but to actually make a difference in the world. Bloggers like Martha Payne and my friend Alyssa have inspired many in different ways through their blogs and by sharing their voice. So why should a teacher give these same opportunities in the classroom, especially with the demands of the profession and often an overwhelming curriculum that we must cover. Though often more informal than structured essays, blogging can encourage young people to trust that their written words have power and that expressing themselves through written storytelling can transform themselves and our communities. Pretty neat huh? Well…here’s one way…

Inquiry-Based Learning - About Us Class Teaching | Sharing best practice in secondary teaching and learning Taking the ‘temperature of learning’ in lessons: a few tried and tested strategies | @mrocallaghan_edu ‘Progress’ appears to be the buzz word in schools at the moment, especially during lesson observations. The new Ofsted framework specifically looks at how teachers enable students to make progress in lessons and over a series of lessons. I believe progress is only as good as the learning objective you measure it against, so making sure your learning objectives are clear and differentiated is vital. This should not be a hoop you jump through for observations but a means to take the ‘temperature of learning’ in a lesson. The information obtained from students can then be used to direct the course of the rest of the lesson. Below is a range of strategies I have used in lessons to try and get students to take a more active role in their learning and take some ownership of the progress they are making. 1. This is very easy to set up and use in lessons. 2. This works by displaying a scale on the board under a learning objective with a happy face at one end and a sad face at the other. 3. 4.

Grant Wiggins: Defining Assessment Grant Wiggins is a nationally recognized assessment expert who has been working in assessment reform for more than twenty-five years. He is president of the educational consulting firm Authentic Education, and with Jay McTighe, co-author of Understanding by Design, an award-winning framework for curriculum design used around the world. In this interview, Wiggins shares his thoughts on performance assessments, standardized tests, and more. Wiggins has published several articles for Edutopia.org. In 2002, he wrote Toward Genuine Accountability: The Case for a New State Assessment System. 1. Our line of argument is that testing is a small part of assessment. What can the test do that more complex, performance-based, project-based things can't do? For instance, in some state-based, performance-based assessment, they always had a parallel paper-and-pencil test for the individual student so that you had enough data on the individual. Back to Top 2. 3. We call it backward design. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Inquiry, Innovation and ICT Inquiry is process whereby learners wonder about and explore the world around them, investigate personally meaningful problems, issues or situations, construct new understandings and reflect on and share what they have learned with others. As Kuhlthau succinctly puts it, "[Inquiry] espouses investigation, exploration, search, quest, research, pursuit, and study." (Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century by Carol C. This web site was developed to support a session at ECOO 2012. What do teachers, teacher-librarians and students need to do to implement an inquiry-oriented program? When looking at the use of technology in the area of inquiry there are a number of ways in which it can be used. as a channel though which learners find and explore informationas a tool to facilitate the development new understandingsas a means of communication amongst learnersas a platform for sharing new understandings

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Gathering Evidence that Flipping the Classroom can Enhance Learning Outcomes As an advocate of the potential of the flipped classroom, it’s rewarding and encouraging when student and teacher feedback supports the benefits of this approach, and this happens quite often. However, a wealth of measurable evidence that the technique can improve learning outcomes would go a long way towards convincing educators everywhere that this is an important technique to consider leveraging further in our schools. Not long ago I stumbled across an article about San Jose State University that discusses measurable improvements in test scores in a course in which some students used a flipped model. “San Jose State U. The Chronicle of Higher Education, October 17, 2012 “In an effort to raise student performance in a difficult course, San Jose State University has turned to a “flipped classroom” format, requiring students to watch lecture videos produced by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and using class time for discussion. “Flipping the Classroom” Cara A. About Kelly Walsh

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 6 Great Videos on Teaching Critical Thinking Critical thinking is a skill that we can teach to our students through exercise and practice. It is particularly a skill that contains a plethora of other skills inside it. Critical thinking in its basic definition refers" to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with evaluating information as well as evaluating our thought in a disciplined way ". Critical thinking is part and parcel of what is called critical theory and hence critical literacy. 1- A Quick Guide to 21st Century Critical Thinking Skills for Teachers2- What Does Critical Thinking Mean in Education3- Great Critical Thinking Poster for your Class4- 7 Great iPad Apps to Improve Kids Critical Thinking5- A Clever Tip to Easily Develop Students Critical Thinking What we have for you today is a great series of videos on critical thinking. 1- Critical Thinking Part 1: A Valuable Argument 2- Critical Thinking Part 2 : Broken Logic 3- Critical Thinking Part 3 : The Man who was Made of Straw

Guide to Developing Good Questions | Steve Mouldey This question development guide was one first developed in a previous school which I have updated recently. The Word version of this is formatted nicely but this gives a good idea of how it works: Brainstorm of your early ideas Questions/topics/areas/issues related to theme that you may be interested in developing further Relevance of your topic What big ideas and/or concepts will I learn about from doing this topic? How do my ideas for an inquiry so far relate to what we have been doing in class? Developing good inquiry questions There are two main types of questions: Questions which require you to simply gather information.Questions which require you to make a reasoned judgement about information. Here are some examples of the two types of question: Now that you have brainstormed some ideas, what is your final choice of a topic? What is the inquiry question you will use to explore this topic? To ensure you have a powerful inquiry question, use the following criteria: Yes (continue) No (continue)

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