background preloader

Teachers toolbox - Professor John Hattie's Table of Effect Sizes

Teachers toolbox - Professor John Hattie's Table of Effect Sizes
Hattie says ‘effect sizes' are the best way of answering the question ‘what has the greatest influence on student learning?'. An effect-size of 1.0 is typically associated with: • advancing learners' achievement by one year, or improving the rate of learning by 50% • a correlation between some variable (e.g., amount of homework) and achievement of approximately .50 • A two grade leap in GCSE, e.g. from a C to an A grade An effect size of 1.0 is clearly enormous! Below is Hattie's table of effect sizes. Terms used in the table (Interpreted by Geoff Petty) • An effect size of 0.5 is equivalent to a one grade leap at GCSE • An effect size of 1.0 is equivalent to a two grade leap at GCSE • ‘Number of effects is the number of effect sizes from well designed studies that have been averaged to produce the average effect size. • An effect size above 0.4 is above average for educational research Some effect sizes are ‘Russian Dolls' containing more than one strategy e.g. Beware Over-interpretation!

http://www.teacherstoolbox.co.uk/T_effect_sizes.html

Related:  John Hattie, Visible LearningashleyweberArticles en anglaisquestioning

What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters I have been a fan of John Hattie’s work ever since I encountered Visible Learning. Hattie has done the most exhaustive meta-analysis in education. Thanks to him, we can gauge not only the relative effectiveness of almost every educational intervention under the sun but we can compare these interventions on an absolute scale of effect size. Perhaps most importantly, Hattie was able to identify a ‘hinge point’ (as he calls it) from exhaustively comparing everything: the effect size of .40. Anything above such an effect size has more of an impact than just a typical year of academic experience and student growth. And an effect size of 1.0 or better is equivalent to advancing the student’s achievement level by approximately a full grade.

Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement  John Hattie developed a way of ranking various influences in different meta-analyses related to learning and achievement according to their effect sizes. In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Therefore he decided to judge the success of influences relative to this ‘hinge point’, in order to find an answer to the question “What works best in education?”

Educational Leadership:Using Assessments Thoughtfully:The Right Questions, The Right Way It is perhaps the most familiar of all classroom routines: A teacher asks the class a question, several students raise their hands, the teacher selects one of those with a hand raised, the student gives a response, the teacher evaluates the student's response, and the cycle begins again. Education researchers call it the standard classroom transaction model or just I-R-E (for initiation-response-evaluation). You will find this model played out it in the vast majority of classrooms in every country in the world. Teachers use this routine to assess where students are so that they can plan next steps. Yet just about every aspect of this scenario actually gets in the way of learning—and it doesn't provide enough information on what most students in the class know and need to learn.

John Hattie's Eight Mind Frames For Teachers “Hattie’s 8 Mind frames”. Video scribe project by Cheryl Reynolds. In Visible Learning for Teachers (p. 159 ff) John Hattie claims that “the major argument in this book underlying powerful impacts in our schools relates to how we think! It is a set of mind frames that underpin our every action and decision in a school; it is a belief that we are evaluators, change agents, adaptive learning experts, seekers of feedback about our impact, engaged in dialogue and challenge, and developers of trust with all, and that we see opportunity in error, and are keen to spread the message about the power, fun, and impact that we have on learning.” John Hattie believes “that teachers and school leaders who develop these ways of thinking are more likely to have major impacts on student learning.”

Student Center Activities During 2004-2007, a team of teachers at FCRR collected ideas and created Student Center Activities for use in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms. Accompanying these Student Center Activities is a Teacher Resource Guide and Professional Development DVD that offers important insights on differentiated instruction and how to use the student center materials. Frequently Asked Questions about Student Center Activities Grades K-1 Student Center Activities (2005) Grades K-1 Student Center Activities (Revised, 2008) Grades 2-3 Student Center Activities (2006) Grades 4-5 Student Center Activities (2007) Student Center Activities and Instructional Routines Search Tool The K-5 Student Center Activities (SCA) and K-3 Instructional Routines search tool provides teacher's access to the 522 individual SCA and the instructional routines from Empowering Teachers.

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment Providing students with feedback on written work can, at times, feel like a burden. Dozens (perhaps even hundreds) of papers clutter your desk, and commenting on each is nearly impossible. Still, we know, both from our experiences and from research, that feedback is essential. John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, believes that feedback must be timely, relevant, and action-oriented. The good news, according to Hattie, is that "students want feedback just for them, just in time, and just helping nudge forward."

Visible Learning: 800+ Meta Studies And 138 Effects Visualized John Hattie has synthesized more than 800 meta-studies related to achievement. In his book Visible Learning he found 138 influences with positive and negative effects on learning outcomes. Some of Hattie’s critics state that comparing so many different things would be like comparing apples and oranges. But is it? The following visualizations show how many studies Hattie actually read and synthesized for his ground-breaking meta-meta-study on what works in the classroom. How many meta-studies has John Hattie synthesized for each of the 138 influences? Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative Program- Departmental Listings - The Ohio State University Administration Executive Director Faculty Board Art Department Senior Graphic Designer Business Office IDEC Director Director, Technology and Operations Help Desk IDEC Webmaster Office Associate Systems Manager Keep Books Literacy Collaborative Research Help Desk Literacy Collaborative Training Office Associate Primary Trainer Program Managers Training Coordinator MIS Systems Manager Reading Recovery

How to move your lessons from good to outstanding Where would I be without Twitter? I have decided to elaborate on this AfL strategy, following this tweet from my @TeacherToolkit account on #ukedchat 3.11.11. My tweet said "#ukedchat Missed out tonight, look forward to reading ideas. My favourite T&L strategy at the moment is "Pose, Pause...Pounce, Bounce" #AfL". Glossary of Hattie's influences on student achievement This Glossary explains influences related to student achievement published in John Hattie’s Visible Learning for teachers (Hattie 2012; 251ff). You can find an older list of influences related to student achievement in Hattie (2009) Visible Learning. 1. Student Self-Reported Grades

Equal Access: Universal Design of Distance Learning Programs A checklist for making distance learning programs welcoming and accessible to all students Represented by students in distance learning courses are a variety of racial and ethnic backgrounds, ages, native languages, and learning styles. In addition, increasing numbers of students with disabilities participate in regular precollege and postsecondary courses.

Research into what makes the biggest difference to student achievement. Feedback is at the top of the list. This is bidirectional, from student to teacher and from teacher to student. by irsanderson Jun 19

Related: