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Inquiry-based Learning - About Us

Inquiry-based Learning - About Us
Related:  Inquiry-Based Learning

What is IBL? - The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is a student-centered method of teaching Mathematics. At the college mathematics level one of the forms of IBL is the Modified Moore Method, named after R. L. Moore. Other forms of IBL are also recognized, which employ different course structures, including some group work, projects, and courses that are not theorem-proof based (e.g. statistics, courses for preservice teachers). Boiled down to its essence IBL is a teaching method that engages students in sense-making activities. E. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) is a method of instruction that places the student, the subject, and their interaction at the center of the learning experience. A typical day in an IBL math course is hard to define, due to the variance across the environments and needs at institutions across the nation and world.

Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future | Module 23: Enquiry learning Introduction The development of thinking and problem solving skills is an important objective of Education for Sustainable Development, especially given the urgency of problems facing the world today. These skills can be taught and enhanced through enquiry learning. Enquiry learning is a learner-centred approach that emphasises higher order thinking skills. This module clarifies the characteristics of enquiry learning and illustrates strategies for teaching through enquiry-based approaches. Objectives To develop an understanding of enquiry-based teaching and learning strategies; To develop skills in planning for enquiry-based learning; and To illustrate ways of evaluating enquiry-based teaching and learning. Activities References Barrett,T., MacLabhrainn, I. and Fallon, H. Boud, D. and Feletti, G. (1997) The Challenge of Problem-based Learning (2nd Edition), Routledge. Duch, B.J., Groh, S.E. and Allen, D.E. Gough, N. (1992) Blueprints for Greening Schools, Gould League, Melbourne Credits

TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy What is Inquiry-based learning? The old adage, “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand” describes the core of inquiry-based learning. Inquiry is the process of seeking truth, information, or knowledge by questioning. Questioning! That is the key. The process of inquiring begins with gathering information and data through applying the human senses: seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, and smelling. Inquiry-based learning processes vary. How does inquiry-based learning encourage student learning? Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today’s world. What does inquiry-based learning look like in the classroom? The following example elaborates on the five steps listed above: questioning, planning and predicting, investigating, recording and reporting, and reflecting. Additional Information on the Five Steps for Inquiry-based Learning Questioning, Planning and Predicting, Investigating, Recording and Reporting, and Reflecting.

AEC394/WC075: What Is Inquiry-Based Instruction? Anna J. Warner and Brian E. Myers2 Introduction Educators should constantly evaluate and adjust their teaching approaches to meet the educational needs of their students and society. What is Inquiry-Based Teaching? Inquiry-based teaching is a teaching method that combines the curiosity of students and the scientific method to enhance the development of critical thinking skills while learning science. Students engage in five activities when they engage in inquiry learning and use the scientific method, as noted in the National Science Education Standards published by the National Academy of Sciences. Figure 1. Tasks of Inquiry Credit: Carin, Bass, & Contant, 2005, p. 21 [Click thumbnail to enlarge.] According to the National Academy of Sciences (1995), when students learn through inquiry, they: question;investigate;use evidence to describe, explain, and predict;connect evidence to knowledge; and share findings. Each of these factors can be found in the following example. Example 1 Example U.S.

Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning Martin Luther King, Jr. considered this to be life's most persistent and urgent question: "What are you doing for others?" As we approach the holiday that honors his legacy, here's another question worth pondering: How many of your students know how to ask persistent and urgent questions of their own? Knowing how to formulate a good question -- and having the courage to ask it -- is a skill with profound social justice implications. That was more than 20 years ago. In their important and accessible book, Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions, the co-authors outline a simple but powerful approach to put classroom questions where they belong: with students. The co-authors' Question Formulation Technique is appropriate for any classroom. Ask as many questions as you can. I'd argue that their approach belongs in the toolkit of any teacher implementing project-based learning. The problem might be that the project focus doesn't connect with students' interests.

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that permit you to seek resolutions to questions and issues while you construct new knowledge. "Inquiry" is defined as "a seeking for truth, information, or knowledge -- seeking information by questioning." A Context for Inquiry Unfortunately, our traditional educational system has worked in a way that discourages the natural process of inquiry. Some of the discouragement of our natural inquiry process may come from a lack of understanding about the deeper nature of inquiry-based learning. Importance of Inquiry Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today's world. The Application of Inquiry

JIBLM.org - Journal of Inquiry-Based Learning in Mathematics - IBL Course Notes in Mathematics 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner” The process itself can be broken down into stages, or phases, that help teachers frame instruction. 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers 1. Student-to-material. 2. 3. 4.

16 Great Educational Web Tools and Apps for Inquiry-based Learning February, 2016As a learning strategy, inquiry-based learning is all about learners constructing their own understanding and knowledge through asking questions. Unlike traditional learning methods that focus primarily on drills, memorization and rote learning, inquiry-based learning is essentially student-centered. It starts with posing questions and directly involves students in challenging hands-on activities that drive students to ask more questions and explore different learning paths. In today’s post, we have assembled a collection of some useful web tools and apps that support the ethos of inquiry-based learning. Web Tools VideoNotes is a free web tool that allows students to take notes on a video they are watching. Edpuzzle allows you to use only what you need from any video, insert audio notes or record over a video with your voice, and add questions at any point in the video .3- PixiClip 6- Hints about Print 8- YouTube Video Editor iPad Apps 2- Penultimate 4- Haiku Deck 5- Tellagami

Inquiry-based learning Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English)[1] starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. The process is often assisted by a facilitator. Inquirers will identify and research issues and questions to develop their knowledge or solutions. Inquiry-based learning includes problem-based learning, and is generally used in small scale investigations and projects, as well as research.[2] History[edit] In the 1960s Joseph Schwab called for inquiry to be divided into four distinct levels.[10] This was later formalized by Marshall Herron in 1971, who developed the Herron Scale to evaluate the amount of inquiry within a particular lab exercise.[11] Since then, there have been a number of revisions proposed and inquiry can take various forms. Characteristics of Inquiry-Based Learning[edit] Specific learning processes that people engage in during inquiry-learning include:[13] 1.

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change. That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated. To change that is easier said than done. How to Encourage Questioning 1. Asking a question can be a scary step into the void. 2. This is a tough one. 3. Part of the appeal of “questions-only” exercises is that there’s an element of play involved, as in: Can you turn that answer/statement into a question? 4. 5. If the long-term goal is to create lifelong questioners, then the challenge is to make questioning a habit -- a part of the way one thinks.

Inquiry-Based Lesson Plans Inquiry Learning Student understanding is the central focus of inquiry learning. Students actively participate in inquiry learning experiences by developing questions and investigating to find solutions. Teachers guide student learning by selecting, designing and planning learning tasks, asking probing questions, observing students at work to identify misconceptions and planning follow up experiences. Though inquiry learning is a component of all areas of the curriculum, mathematics and science is the focus of the elementary inquiry lessons. Search for a Lesson Plan Return to Teach 21 Home

Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson? Recently, I was looking through my bookshelves and discovered an entire shelf of instruction books that came with software I had previously purchased. Yes, there was a time when software was bought in stores, not downloaded. Upon closer examination of these instruction books, I noticed that many of them were for computers and software that I no longer use or even own. I realized that I did the same when I bought a new car -- with one exception. This pattern was and is true for every device I buy. The Need to Know Too many classrooms ignore this basic learning model. Lessons, units, and topics are more motivating when they begin with a question whose answer students want to know. There is a catch, though, in using questions to begin your lesson. Have you ever forgotten the name of a song and spent hours trying to remember it? 10 Questions That Motivate Learning Questions this powerful are hard to find. Middle school math: What does Martin Luther King have in common with algebra?

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