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Inquiry-Based Learning - About Us

Inquiry-Based Learning - About Us

http://www.inquiry-based.com/

Related:  inquiryInquiry-Based LearningPBL and Global InquiryInquiry-Based LearningINQUIRY BASED LEARNING

An open education resource supports a diversity of inquiry-based learning Catherine Anne Schmidt-Jones University of Illinois Urbana-Champagne, USA Abstract There have been numerous calls for research that demonstrates how open education resources (OERs) are actually being used. This case study sought to shed light on the users of a well-visited set of modular music-education materials published at Connexions. Respondents to a voluntary survey included teachers, students, self-directed learners, music ensemble participants, and casual learners.

What is IBL? - The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is a student-centered method of teaching Mathematics. At the college mathematics level one of the forms of IBL is the Modified Moore Method, named after R. L. Moore. Other forms of IBL are also recognized, which employ different course structures, including some group work, projects, and courses that are not theorem-proof based (e.g. statistics, courses for preservice teachers).

Inquiry, Innovation and ICT Inquiry is process whereby learners wonder about and explore the world around them, investigate personally meaningful problems, issues or situations, construct new understandings and reflect on and share what they have learned with others. As Kuhlthau succinctly puts it, "[Inquiry] espouses investigation, exploration, search, quest, research, pursuit, and study." (Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century by Carol C. Kuhlthau, Leslie K. Maniotes and Ann K. Caspari, 2007). Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future Introduction The development of thinking and problem solving skills is an important objective of Education for Sustainable Development, especially given the urgency of problems facing the world today. These skills can be taught and enhanced through enquiry learning.

TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy What is Inquiry-based learning? The old adage, “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand” describes the core of inquiry-based learning. Inquiry is the process of seeking truth, information, or knowledge by questioning. Questioning! That is the key. Inquiry-based Learning With and Without Facilitator Interactions Abstract This paper discusses findings of a study investigating how students, on four online courses, engaged in inquiry-based learning with and without support from a facilitator. The investigation was conducted by analysing discussions of the online courses using the community of inquiry model. The results of the study imply that students in online discussions can engage in deep and meaningful learning, even when there is no facilitator interaction.

AEC394/WC075: What Is Inquiry-Based Instruction? Anna J. Warner and Brian E. Myers2 Introduction Questioning – Top Ten Strategies “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein Questioning is the very cornerstone of philosophy and education, ever since Socrates ( in our Western tradition) decided to annoy pretty much everyone by critiquing and harrying people with questions – it has been central to our development of thinking and our capacity to learn. Indeed, it is so integral to all that we do that it is often overlooked when developing pedagogy – but it as crucial to teaching as air is to breathing.

Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning Martin Luther King, Jr. considered this to be life's most persistent and urgent question: "What are you doing for others?" As we approach the holiday that honors his legacy, here's another question worth pondering: How many of your students know how to ask persistent and urgent questions of their own? Knowing how to formulate a good question -- and having the courage to ask it -- is a skill with profound social justice implications.

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that permit you to seek resolutions to questions and issues while you construct new knowledge.

Introduction 1. Students learn isolated skills and knowledge, starting with the simple building blocks of a particular topic and then building to more complex ideas. While this appeals to common sense (think of the efficiency of a automobile assembly line), the problem with this approach is the removal of any context to the learning, making deep understanding of the content less likely. Perkins calls this approach elementitis, where learning is structured exclusively around disconnected skills and fragmented pieces of information. 2.

Inquiry-based learning Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English)[1] starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. The process is often assisted by a facilitator. Inquirers will identify and research issues and questions to develop their knowledge or solutions. Inquiry-based learning includes problem-based learning, and is generally used in small scale investigations and projects, as well as research.[2] History[edit] In the 1960s Joseph Schwab called for inquiry to be divided into four distinct levels.[10] This was later formalized by Marshall Herron in 1971, who developed the Herron Scale to evaluate the amount of inquiry within a particular lab exercise.[11] Since then, there have been a number of revisions proposed and inquiry can take various forms.

20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”.

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