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The Other 21st Century Skills: Educator Self-Assessment

The Other 21st Century Skills: Educator Self-Assessment
Chartkamp–I think I understand what you are saying, but in any scenario, someone, or something will spur the impetus for learning to occur. We could have a toddler go about and learn the world from scratch, but I don’t think anyone would say that is as efficient and as effective as a “parent” facilitating, or at least providing for a safe environment. And the better the parent, the more effective the toddler will be at contributing to the learning within the community as he/she progresses. Can you describe what you mean by informal learning? I can take that to be exploratory, on your own, as equals, not in a classroom, and so many more ways. Take the place, school, out of the equation.

https://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/the-other-21st-century-skills-educator-self-assessment/

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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A Very Good Checklist for Assessing 21st Century Learning Skills January 29, 2015 Here is another great resource from Dr. Jackie Gerstein, one of our favourite EdTech bloggers. Jackie designed this beautiful chart featuring 12 attributes and skills that teachers should tend to in their instruction. You can use it as a self-assessment checklist to help you evaluate your teaching practice. What I like the most about this chart is the fact that it emphasizes the social and affective component in learning, something which is often overlooked in today’s digitally-focused learning paradigms.

The Secret to Drawing Meaningful Reflection Out of Your Students - The Art of Ed If your students blog about their art as mine currently do, you understand the rich reflection that blogging can produce. When students reflect on both their finished pieces and the processes they went through to create them, they tend to communicate more in writing than they would in a class critique. As you read the writing, you discover much about the art and the student’s reason for making it. Examples of learning intentions The learning intention is expressed in terms of knowledge, understanding and skills, and links directly with the relevant curriculum document. The design of learning intentions starts with the answers to these questions. What do I want students to know?

How to Make Time for Reflection in the Arts Classroom Let’s be honest, when an art project goes long, or a class is a little crazy, structured reflection is the first thing to go. This happens in spite of the fact that we KNOW reflecting makes all the difference when it comes to students retaining their discoveries and being able to apply their learning in other contexts. In the words of John Dewey, “We do not learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience.” Like most things that are of paramount importance, creating an environment in which meaningful reflection can happen is difficult, especially if you are a teaching artist who only temporarily inhabits another teacher’s classroom. Museums, libraries and archives - learning - Inspiring Learning checklists Detailed framework (PDF, 3,094kb)This document sets out the detailed framework of organisational outcomes expected from use of the People, Places, Partnerships and Policies self-assessment and planning tool Summary of outcomes and processes (pdf, 1366kb)Inspiring learning is about outcomes as well as processes. Both outcomes and processes are summarised in this 2 page document Quick checklist (PDF, 34kb)The quick checklist will give you an overview of your current strengths, priorities for improvement and which areas you need to focus on for a more detailed assessment Generic Learning Outcome checklists and coding tools

How do You Remove the Unused Parts of Cropped Screenshots in Microsoft Office Documents? When you add a screenshot to a Microsoft Office document and crop it, you most likely give no further thought to the unused portions, but did you know that they are still there and could pose a security risk if they contain sensitive information? Today’s SuperUser Q&A helps a worried reader retain only those parts of the screenshots needed while permanently getting rid of the rest. Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites. The Question SuperUser reader user462760 wants to know how to stop Microsoft Office from retaining the unused parts of cropped screenshots in documents: I made a worrying discovery that after cropping a screenshot in Word, PowerPoint, and likely other Microsoft Office programs, the unused parts of cropped screenshots are retained.

How A Simple Checklist Can Improve Learning How A Simple Checklist Can Improve Learning From reminding us of what to pack for a trip to helping doctors perform surgery, checklists are crucial for projects that require sequential steps or a series of tasks. As Atul Gawande points out in his book “Checklist Manifesto,” checklists break down complex tasks and also ensure consistency and efficiency if more than one person is working on a project. Professional Learning That Matters 10 Keys to Making Professional Learning Meaningful By Samantha Cleaver Chances are, as you look at your calendar of scheduled professional learning days, you aren’t overcome with excitement.

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