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The Other 21st Century Skills: Educator Self-Assessment

The Other 21st Century Skills: Educator Self-Assessment
Chartkamp–I think I understand what you are saying, but in any scenario, someone, or something will spur the impetus for learning to occur. We could have a toddler go about and learn the world from scratch, but I don’t think anyone would say that is as efficient and as effective as a “parent” facilitating, or at least providing for a safe environment. And the better the parent, the more effective the toddler will be at contributing to the learning within the community as he/she progresses. Can you describe what you mean by informal learning? I can take that to be exploratory, on your own, as equals, not in a classroom, and so many more ways. Take the place, school, out of the equation.

https://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/the-other-21st-century-skills-educator-self-assessment/

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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A Very Good Checklist for Assessing 21st Century Learning Skills January 29, 2015 Here is another great resource from Dr. Jackie Gerstein, one of our favourite EdTech bloggers. Jackie designed this beautiful chart featuring 12 attributes and skills that teachers should tend to in their instruction. You can use it as a self-assessment checklist to help you evaluate your teaching practice. What I like the most about this chart is the fact that it emphasizes the social and affective component in learning, something which is often overlooked in today’s digitally-focused learning paradigms.

The Secret to Drawing Meaningful Reflection Out of Your Students - The Art of Ed If your students blog about their art as mine currently do, you understand the rich reflection that blogging can produce. When students reflect on both their finished pieces and the processes they went through to create them, they tend to communicate more in writing than they would in a class critique. As you read the writing, you discover much about the art and the student’s reason for making it. 5 Things Life's High Performers Know and Master  In today's hyper-paced society it can be challenging to keep up with the rate of change. Especially if you are someone who is constantly looking to achieve high performance in life. In our quest to always be one step ahead and succeeding we often look for new and innovative ways to stay ahead. One slight problem though is that we forget some of the fundamentals along the way.

Examples of learning intentions The learning intention is expressed in terms of knowledge, understanding and skills, and links directly with the relevant curriculum document. The design of learning intentions starts with the answers to these questions. What do I want students to know? How to Make Time for Reflection in the Arts Classroom Let’s be honest, when an art project goes long, or a class is a little crazy, structured reflection is the first thing to go. This happens in spite of the fact that we KNOW reflecting makes all the difference when it comes to students retaining their discoveries and being able to apply their learning in other contexts. In the words of John Dewey, “We do not learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience.” Like most things that are of paramount importance, creating an environment in which meaningful reflection can happen is difficult, especially if you are a teaching artist who only temporarily inhabits another teacher’s classroom.

DECA Idea Challenge What is the Idea Challenge? Toolkit | Website | Flyer DECA is excited to bring you another year of the DECA Idea Challenge, a fast-paced experiential learning exercise that dares elementary, secondary and college students to find an innovative new use for a common, everyday item. A premier event of Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW), the DECA Idea Challenge is a fast-paced, hands-on learning experience that dares students around the globe to generate an innovative new use for a commonplace item in just eight days. After organizing into groups, students must

#Productivity: 6 Best Apps To Stay On Track And Achieve Success; 4 Of Them Are Free! We all know the importance of setting goals – they hold you accountable, tell you what you truly want and help propel you forward. Whether you strive to get started on that new project, spend more time at home, launch a new product, or want to lose weight, many of us simply state our goals but fail to set deadlines and track our progress towards achieving our goals. Integrating your goals into your digital life is an easy way to keep your goals top of mind and help keep you motivated. Some apps even allow you to make your goals public, helping to hold you accountable and garner support from friends and family.

How do You Remove the Unused Parts of Cropped Screenshots in Microsoft Office Documents? When you add a screenshot to a Microsoft Office document and crop it, you most likely give no further thought to the unused portions, but did you know that they are still there and could pose a security risk if they contain sensitive information? Today’s SuperUser Q&A helps a worried reader retain only those parts of the screenshots needed while permanently getting rid of the rest. Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites. The Question SuperUser reader user462760 wants to know how to stop Microsoft Office from retaining the unused parts of cropped screenshots in documents: I made a worrying discovery that after cropping a screenshot in Word, PowerPoint, and likely other Microsoft Office programs, the unused parts of cropped screenshots are retained.

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