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Blind & Visually Impaired Photographers

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Shooting Blind (Aperture, 2002) Films. Miss Blindsight When noted photographer and sculptor Alice Wingwall began losing her sight, she became determined to continue making visual art.

Films

John Dugdale

Curiosity & The Blind Photographer. A talk by Mark Willis (2007) Paul Strand.

Curiosity & The Blind Photographer

Blind. 1916. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. I want to find new ways to talk about accessibility to engage people who would not otherwise consider that it pertains to them. When I talk about accessibility it doesn’t mean whether or not there is wi-fi at Starbuck’s. This image by Paul Strand is my first milestone in talking about accessibility in terms of culture. Another haunting aspect of this image is the way in which the photograph was taken. To Photograph Is To See. Blind All Around the World. BlindSide: A Game for Players Who Can't See.

Earlier this year, a minor injury to my right eye left me temporarily blind.

BlindSide: A Game for Players Who Can't See

I could do little but sit in bed and listen to audio books, until someone told me about the video game BlindSide, which doesn’t, in fact, contain any video. It is a meticulously designed, audio-driven thriller that is entirely devoid of graphics. Built to entertain blind players as well as those who can see, the audio-only game’s accommodation of disabled gamers is a pleasant anomaly in the gaming industry, even though the number of gamers with disabilities is significant.

The latest Americans with Disabilities report, which draws on 2010 census data, estimates that nearly fifty-seven million Americans, or roughly nineteen per cent of the population, have a disability, with over thirty-eight million suffering from what the report considers to be a “severe disability” of a physical, mental, or communicative nature. BlindSide is one of those games.

Others have sought to build on the game.

Flo Fox

Blind Vendor. California Museum of Photography. Photodemocracy. 19th March 2013 Mask (2008) by Kurt Weston In 2009 The University of California Riverside and The California Museum of Photography hosted an innovative exhibition entitled Sight Unseen.

photodemocracy

This exhibition had a very distinct and brave mission statement - to bring together the world's best blind photographers. Sight Unseen was the first major exhibition of its kind, celebrating the 'feel' and the act of photography as well as the visual outcomes. The pictures are undeniably excellent, and would be considered so, regardless of the artist's visual condition. Well, we can only deliberate. Connected (2006) by Michael Richard La convivencia de una frontera natural avasallada por el viento (A natural boundary subdued by the wind) (2000) by Gerardo Nigendia Stations by Pete Eckert.

My blind spot, my students and me. "I was convinced that it was time to embrace my partial blindness and place it at the centre of my academic career," says Hannah Thompson.

My blind spot, my students and me

Photograph: James Clifford Kent. I have been registered blind all my life but because I have what opthalmologists like to call "some useful sight" in one eye, I have always operated in a sighted way and done my best to 'pass' as a fully sighted person. Throughout my education at a mainstream comprehensive school and then at Newnham College, Cambridge, I studied using sighted methods and refused to learn braille or carry a white cane. I wasn't completely blind, but I wasn't completely sighted either. And I had no idea how to negotiate this shadowy in between space. Sophie Calle: Blind: Amazon.co.uk: Sophie Calle. No stranger to the art of staging and to the act of disclosure, Sophie Caile returns again here to the theme of autobiography and to the notion of the Other, revealing in all their difference and singularity those who have been blind since birth or who have gone blind following an accident.

Sophie Calle: Blind: Amazon.co.uk: Sophie Calle

By establishing a dialectic between the testimonies of several generations of blind people and the photographs taken by her on the basis on these accounts, Sophie Caile offers readers a reflection on absence, on the loss of one sense and the compensation of another, on the notion of the visible and the invisible. Group Study of photographers with visual impairment « julia cameron photography. Images displayed in Fusion, the Forum, Norwich on a 24 metre wide screen.

Group Study of photographers with visual impairment « julia cameron photography

They are the context shots for the photographs taken by photographers from Norfolk who have visual impairment, yet enjoy photography and the support of like-minded people. Effstopeyes: Images from the Edge of Sight, Fusion, The Forum Norwich. Until 8th Feb. Open Mon to Sat 10-5.

Béatrice de Géa

Evgen Bavcar. How Blind Photographers Like Chris Holmes Are Overcoming The Odds To Produce Stunning Images. At first it sounds almost like a oxymoron: if photography is the art of capturing a visual moment, how can someone who is blind be a successful photographer?

How Blind Photographers Like Chris Holmes Are Overcoming The Odds To Produce Stunning Images

Yet a growing online community is full of examples of precisely that, as visually impaired snappers share their experiences of producing quality work against the odds. But how, and why? Chris Holmes became blind almost overnight at 14, due to a genetic eye disorder. A photographer since childhood, Holmes also happens to be one of Great Britain’s most successful Paralympic swimmers and a nine-times gold medalist. A photograph by Chris Holmes of his dog Lottie in his office, preparing for the Olympics. “It’s always marvellous to think about what you can do with a camera, how you can capture the essence of a moment”, he says.

Holmes talks a lot about the importance of the “energy stored within a moment” - it’s clear that for him, photography’s ability to freeze time is what's most important. Paralympian Holmes takes his own self-portrait.