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Cookies are Not Accepted - New York Times. Project to map human brain from womb to birth releases stunning images. A landmark project to map the wiring of the human brain from womb to birth has released thousands of images that will help scientists unravel how conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy and attention deficit disorders arise in the brain.

Project to map human brain from womb to birth releases stunning images

The first tranche of images come from 40 newborn babies who were scanned in their sleep to produce stunning high-resolution pictures of early brain anatomy and the intricate neural wiring that ferries some of the earliest signals around the organ. The initial batch of brain scans are intended to give researchers a first chance to analyse the data and provide feedback to the senior scientists at King’s College London, Oxford University and Imperial College London who are leading the Developing Human Connectome Project, which is funded by €15m (£12.5m) from the EU. Hundreds of thousands more images will be released in the coming months and years.

Taking brain scans of sleeping babies is hard enough. Being on the same wavelength isn't just a figure of speech. It's proven neuroscience. — Quartz. Physicist Richard Feynman returned over and over to an idea that drove his groundbreaking discoveries.

Being on the same wavelength isn't just a figure of speech. It's proven neuroscience. — Quartz

His approach was documented by his Caltech colleague David Goodstein in the book Feynman’s Lost Lecture about physics classes Feynman taught in the 1960s: Once, I said to him, “Dick, explain to me, so that I can understand it, why spin one-half particles obey Fermi-Dirac statistics.” Study uncovers how brain damage increases religious fundamentalism. Research has found religious belief is associated with certain regions of the human brain, but there is still much to learn about how these areas influence religious belief.

Study uncovers how brain damage increases religious fundamentalism

A new study in the journal Neuropsychologia found that lesions in a particular brain region tend to increase religious fundamentalism. “Human beliefs, and in this case religious beliefs, are one of the cognitive and social knowledge stores that distinguish us from other species and are an indication of how evolution and cognitive/social processes influenced the development of the human brain,” Jordan Grafman of Northwestern University, the study’s corresponding author, told PsyPost. Grafman and his colleagues examined male Vietnam combat veterans with lesions to part of the brain known as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Neuroscientists Discover a Song That Reduces Anxiety By 65 Percent (Listen) Anxiety — that feeling of dread, fear, worry and panic — is certainly nothing new.

Neuroscientists Discover a Song That Reduces Anxiety By 65 Percent (Listen)

Hippocrates wrote about it in the fourth century BCE. As did Søren Kierkegaard in the 1860s. And Sigmund Freud addressed the disorder in 1926. Scientists Surprised to Find No Two Neurons Are Genetically Alike. The past few decades have seen intensive efforts to find the genetic roots of neurological disorders, from schizophrenia to autism.

Scientists Surprised to Find No Two Neurons Are Genetically Alike

But the genes singled out so far have provided only sketchy clues. Even the most important genetic risk factors identified for autism, for example, may only account for a few percent of all cases. Much frustration stems from the realization that the key mutations elevating disease risk tend to be rare, because they are less likely to be passed on to offspring. More common mutations confer only small risks (although those risks become more significant when calculated across an entire population).

Neuroscience. After watching this, your brain will not be the same. Your Brain Has A DELETE Button And Here's How To Use It! There’s an old saying in neuroscience: “neurons that fire together wire together.”

Your Brain Has A DELETE Button And Here's How To Use It!

This means the more you run a neuro-circuit in your brain, the stronger that circuit becomes. This is why, to quote another old saw, “practice makes perfect”. The more you practice piano, or speaking a language, or juggling, the stronger those circuits get. Scientists have known this for years. Man Missing Most Of His Brain Challenges Everything We Thought We Knew About Consciousness. Yet miraculously, the man was not only fully conscious, but lived a rich and unhindered life, working as a civil servant and living with his wife and two kids, blissfully unaware of the gaping hole in his brain.

Man Missing Most Of His Brain Challenges Everything We Thought We Knew About Consciousness

His ability to function without so many of the key brain regions previously considered vital for consciousness raises some major questions about existing theories regarding how the brain works and the mechanisms underlying our awareness. Empathy for others’ pain rooted in cognition rather than sensation, CU-Boulder study finds. The ability to understand and empathize with others’ pain is grounded in cognitive neural processes rather than sensory ones, according to the results of a new study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers.

Empathy for others’ pain rooted in cognition rather than sensation, CU-Boulder study finds

Artists 'have structurally different brains'. 17 April 2014Last updated at 05:35 ET By Melissa Hogenboom Science reporter, BBC Radio Science Brain scans revealed artists have more grey matter in parts of their brains Artists have structurally different brains compared with non-artists, a study has found.

Artists 'have structurally different brains'

Participants' brain scans revealed that artists had increased neural matter in areas relating to fine motor movements and visual imagery. MCB80x Course Intro: The Complex Species. The Fundamentals of Neuroscience: Nervous System Basics. Mcb80x. What percentage of your brain do you use? - Richard E. Cytowic. Reconstructing visual experiences from brain activity evoked by natural movies - GallantLabUCB.

Neurophenomenology.com. Kvinnors och mäns hjärnor olika kopplade. Brain Stimulation May Induce the Human Will to Persevere - Wired Science. The salience network, highlighted here in two epilepsy patients, is thought to mediate our response to important internal or external signals, such as pain or the sound of a siren.

Brain Stimulation May Induce the Human Will to Persevere - Wired Science

Image: Parvizi et al. Neuron 2013 One epilepsy patient reported a flushing in his chest and described a feeling of determinedness, like getting ready to drive through a storm. A second reported similar feelings, a response scientists involved in the study called “the will to persevere.” 'Memories' pass between generations. Behaviour can be affected by events in previous generations which have been passed on through a form of genetic memory, animal studies suggest. Experiments showed that a traumatic event could affect the DNA in sperm and alter the brains and behaviour of subsequent generations. A Nature Neuroscience study shows mice trained to avoid a smell passed their aversion on to their "grandchildren". Experts said the results were important for phobia and anxiety research.

A Neuroscientist's Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious - Wired Science. It’s a question that’s perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? We know it exists, at least in ourselves. But how it arises from chemistry and electricity in our brains is an unsolved mystery. Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he might know the answer. What percentage of your brain do you use? - Richard E. Cytowic.