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Reconstructing visual experiences from brain activity evoked by natural movies - GallantLabUCB

Reconstructing visual experiences from brain activity evoked by natural movies - GallantLabUCB

https://sites.google.com/site/gallantlabucb/publications/nishimoto-et-al-2011

Related:  VisionNeuroscience

Video Reconstruction of Visual Memory Ever dreamed of recording your dreams and turning them into a video clip? The technology that enables you to do that is near: UC Berkeley scientists figured out a way to turn the way our brains interpret visual stimuli into a video, and the result is amazing. To be able to do this, the researches used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to measure the blood flow through brain's visual cortex. Then, different parts of the brain were divided into volumetric pixels or voxels (the term might be familiar to those who remember early 3D games which were based on voxels instead of polygons which are more commonly used today). Finally, the scientists built a computational model which describes how visual information is mapped into brain activity.

Brainwave entrainment Brainwave Entrainment is any practice that aims to cause brainwave frequencies to fall into step with a periodic stimulus having a frequency corresponding to the intended brain-state (for example, to induce sleep), usually attempted with the use of specialized software. It purportedly depends upon a "frequency following" response on the assumption that the human brain has a tendency to change its dominant EEG frequency towards the frequency of a dominant external stimulus.[citation needed] Such a stimulus is often aural, as in the case of binaural or monaural beats and isochronic tones, or else visual, as with a dreamachine, a combination of the two with a mind machine, or even electromagnetic radiation. Hemispheric Synchronization, a potential and generally desired result of brainwave entrainment, refers to a state when the brainwave pattern of the right and left hemispheres become alike.

Table of contents (With last update date) Cover Foreword (August 13, 2009) Part 1. Visual Processing: Eye and Retina (Section 2, Chapter 14) Neuroscience Online: An Electronic Textbook for the Neurosciences In this chapter you will learn about how the visual system initiates the processing of external stimuli. The chapter will familiarize you with measures of visual sensation by discussing the basis of form perception, visual acuity, visual field representation, binocular fusion, and depth perception. An important aspect is the regional differences in our visual perception: the central visual field is color-sensitive, has high acuity vision, operates at high levels of illumination whereas the periphery is more sensitive at low levels of illumination, is relatively color insensitive, and has poor visual acuity. You will learn that the image is first projected onto a flattened sheet of photoreceptor cells that lie on the inner surface of the eye (retina). The information gathered by millions of receptor cells is projected next onto millions of bipolar cells, which, in turn, send projects to retinal ganglion cells.

Brain Stimulation May Induce the Human Will to Persevere - Wired Science The salience network, highlighted here in two epilepsy patients, is thought to mediate our response to important internal or external signals, such as pain or the sound of a siren. Image: Parvizi et al. Neuron 2013 One epilepsy patient reported a flushing in his chest and described a feeling of determinedness, like getting ready to drive through a storm. A second reported similar feelings, a response scientists involved in the study called “the will to persevere.”

Antoine Lutz's Homepage I am currently an associate scientist at the Waisman Lab for Brain Imaging & Behavior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I am doing my research in collaboration with Prof. R. J. Davidson and several researchers from his lab. Contact: Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging & Behavior University of Wisconsin-Madison 1500 Highland Avenue Madison, WI 53703-2280 (tel) (1).608.262.8705 (fax) (1).608.262.9440 alutz@wisc.edu

Web resources on consciousness, philosophy, and such Web resources related to consciousness, philosophy, and such. Compiled by David Chalmers Here are a small number of high-quality academic resources on the web that I find useful or interesting. The emphasis is on sites containing real intellectual content. Visual Pathways The spatial organization of the brain often provides hints about what the brain does to transform sensory input to useful information for the guidance of action and thought. Spatial organization can be seen at many different levels: Functional specialization: different types of information are processed in different parts of the brain (with varying degrees of separation). Columnar architecture: within a brain area, neurons with similar (or complimentary) sensitivities lie close together, often in "columns" or "pinwheels". Topography/Retinotopy: a "map" of the visual world (or, a map of the retina) is preserved in many visual brain areas.

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