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Oxford University Press Plagiarized Wikipedia, Now Who the Hell Should I Believe?  The Covert World of People Trying to Edit Wikipedia for Pay. On January 11, 2013, James Heilman, an emergency-room physician and one of Wikipedia’s most prolific medical editors, was standing watch over the online encyclopedia’s entry for a back procedure called a kyphoplasty.

The Covert World of People Trying to Edit Wikipedia for Pay

The page originally suggested that the procedure’s effectiveness was “controversial,” and an unidentified Wikipedia user had proposed changing the text to “well documented and studied”—a characterization that Heilman thought wasn’t supported by existing research. Macedonians Take Advantage of U.S. Post-Truth Politics to Make a Buck. The single most amazing story of the election was thrown up on the Intertoobz on Thursday by Buzzfeed News.

Macedonians Take Advantage of U.S. Post-Truth Politics to Make a Buck

It describes how the campaign of the Republican presidential nominee has re-energized the economy of Macedonia, and it is, well, just amazing. "Your Prayers Have Been Answered," declared the headline. For Trump supporters, that certainly seemed to be the case. They helped the baseless story generate over 140,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook.

Meanwhile, roughly 6,000 miles away in a small Macedonian town, a young man watched as money began trickling into his Google AdSense account. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below. The Internet's Dark Ages. The high cost of not finding information. By Susan Feldman On Sept 23, 1999, NASA's Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft disappeared.

The high cost of not finding information

The spacecraft had flown nine-and-a-half months and 416 million miles flawlessly. » Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable Clay Shirky. Back in 1993, the Knight-Ridder newspaper chain began investigating piracy of Dave Barry’s popular column, which was published by the Miami Herald and syndicated widely.

» Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable Clay Shirky

Web usage data outline map of knowledge. How to choose your news - Damon Brown. How the media landscape has changed Media visionary Clay Shirky gave a TED Talk on how the media landscape has changed.

How to choose your news - Damon Brown

“The moment we’re living through, the moment our historical generation is living through, is the largest increase in expressive capability in human history.” Professor Wikipedia. Essay on Wikipedia's fifteenth anniversary. Wikipedia came into the world 15 years ago today -- and, man, what an ugly baby.

Essay on Wikipedia's fifteenth anniversary

The first snapshot of it in the Internet Archive is from late March of 2001, when Wikipedia was already 10 weeks old. Science magazine can’t defend its flawed business model. Facebook News Feed: Finally lets you choose which friends' posts to see first. Courtesy of Facebook The big complaint about Facebook* has always been that you can’t control what you see in your News Feed.

Facebook News Feed: Finally lets you choose which friends' posts to see first.

That is finally beginning to change. Facebook announced a new set of options Thursday that will let you specify, among other things, which friends’ posts you’d like to see at the top of your feed when you open the app or website. The Eight-Second Attention Span. Infographic Shows Fair Use’s Importance in a Day in the Life of a College Student. In conjunction with Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2016, ARL is releasing an infographic that shows how a college student relies on fair use numerous times in a typical day.

Infographic Shows Fair Use’s Importance in a Day in the Life of a College Student

Fair use and fair dealing are vitally important rights for everybody, everywhere—students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material. These doctrines provide balance to the copyright system by allowing the use of copyrighted resources without permission from the rightholder under certain circumstances, thereby promoting creative progress and accommodating freedom of expression. “Self-literacy” in the information age. By Mary Madden Our “Digital Footprints” research found that many Americans are jumping into the participatory Web without considering all the implications.

“Self-literacy” in the information age

If nothing really bad has happened to someone, they continue to neither worry about their personal information nor take steps to limit the amount of information that can be found about them online. But “self-literacy,” or knowing what information is available about you online, is becoming a critical component of digital literacy in the information age.

Why plagiarize when you can rip off a writer's thoughts? Lines on Plagiarism Blur for Students in the Digital Age. “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University.

Lines on Plagiarism Blur for Students in the Digital Age

“It’s possible to believe this information is just out there for anyone to take.” Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to understand why it is so widespread. In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about 40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in written assignments.

Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade. Ms. Photo. The_lawsuit_against_sci_hub_begs_the_question_why_are_academic_journals.