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Papercraft 3D Self Portrait

Papercraft 3D Self Portrait

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Guide to Image Sharpening Image sharpening is a powerful tool for emphasizing texture and drawing viewer focus. It's also required of any digital photo at some point — whether you're aware it's been applied or not. Digital camera sensors and lenses always blur an image to some degree, for example, and this requires correction. However, not all sharpening techniques are created equal. When performed too aggressively, unsightly sharpening artifacts may appear. On the other hand, when done correctly, sharpening can often improve apparent image quality even more so than upgrading to a high-end camera lens.

Free icons! Author: YOOtheme Icon set website: Visit site License: Free for commercial use (Include link to authors website) Author: Taytel Icon set website: Visit site Holography without Lasers: Hand-drawn Holograms [SCIENCE HOBBYIST] Several hologram plates.(Obviously you cannot see the 3D effect in this flat photograph.) Depending on the tilt of the plate with respect to the sun, you might accidentally discover the "pseudoscopic" image of the "V," and it may appear to float *above* the surface of the plastic. Tilt the plate to bring the far edge up and towards you and you'll then find the "orthoscopic" image floating deep within the plate. If you had inscribed your entire name on the plastic, you'd now be seeing it down there within the surface.

Long Exposure Photography Long exposure photography is one of the coolest ways of taking pictures. It requires a longer shutter speed, anywhere from 1/2 sec up to several minutes or even a hour. The ability to take long exposures requires a user to use a tripod for optimum results (of course, some people prefer the hand shake look). The use of a tripod is essential because the inability for the human hand to stay still is truly remarkable. Chouette The first kit of the new year is this deceivingly simple looking little owl to expand the bird-population in 3EyedBear’s universe. We all know owls are one of the wisest creatures and this one certainly will be one day too. Thing is: she’s still very young and inexperienced, but she compensates that with a passion for reading thick books while you sleep.

Dreamtime astronomers understood meteors › News in Science (ABC Science) News in Science Tuesday, 15 March 2011 Stuart GaryABC Early astronomers A new study has found Aboriginal dreamtime stories were linking meteorites to impact craters and the origins of life, thousands of years before modern science. While the night skies play important roles in many traditional cultures around the world, Duane Hamacher from Sydney's Macquarie University says the Arrernte and Luritja people of central Australia have an unusually strong focus on meteors, meteorites and impact craters. Any phonetic script can be learned in just a few hours If you liked my association technique mentioned below, you would also enjoy my tips on using imagination to memorize vocabulary, which are discussed in great detail with many other hacks in the Language Hacking Guide. See the most popular posts on the right below for other interesting topics. For those curious, this post discusses Thai, but the ideas can equally be applied to other phonetic scripts such as Japanese (but not as well for Chinese). Just one week into the challenge of reading/speaking Thai in 8 weeks (actually only about 5 hours total, since I’ve been quite busy since I arrived, but I’ve made time to learn on the skytrain/in restaurants/taxis etc.) and I’ve reached the first major milestone already. I can read Thai. The major thing still missing is tones, which admittedly are an extremely important part of this language that cannot be ignored and I will get to shortly (Edit: Done!

Invisible Cities by Maria Popova What social media activity has to do with the literal lay of the land. In December, the now-infamous map of Facebook friendships revealed an uncanny cartography of the world depicted purely through social relationships data. Now, a project by Christian Marc Schmidt and Liangjie Xia is taking the concept ambitiously further: Invisible Cities is a transmedia mapping project, displaying geocoded activity from social networks like Twitter and Flickr within the context of an actual urban map — a visceral, literal embodiment of something VURB‘s Ben Cerveny has called “the city as a platform,” the idea that cities are informational media and living computational systems for urban society. By revealing the social networks present within the urban environment, Invisible Cities describes a new kind of city — a city of the mind.”

Water Marble Tutorial. Supplies: orange stick or... Water Marble Tutorial. Supplies: orange stick or toothpick, shot glass or cup (the smaller the circumference, the less polish you end up wasting), room temp. water, nail polish, tape (optional, but it helps with the clean up) I like to begin by prepping my nails with base coat and one coat of polish. Here I used China Glaze Innocence for a nice neutral base. Steps: Papercraft – Howl’s Moving Castle « Scawley A man called Ben Millett spent 72 hours over three weeks making this detailed Howl’s Moving Castle papercraft. Fantastic papercraft model Screen capture for comparison from the film by Studio Ghibli See the time-lapse video after the jump Timelapse video -approximately 5mins long

50 Tips to Maximize Productivity Here are commonsense yet practical tips on how we can maximize productivity in our daily lives. Try out some of these for yourself and discover which ones work best for you. 1. Photosynth Photosynth is a software application from Microsoft Live Labs and the University of Washington that analyzes digital photographs and generates a three-dimensional model of the photos and a point cloud of a photographed object.[1] Pattern recognition components compare portions of images to create points, which are then compared to convert the image into a model. Users are able to view and generate their own models using a software tool available for download at the Photosynth website. History[edit] Photosynth is based on Photo Tourism, a research project by University of Washington graduate student Noah Snavely.[2] Shortly after Microsoft's acquisition of Seadragon in early 2006, that team began work on Photosynth, under the direction of Seadragon founder Blaise Agüera y Arcas.[3] Microsoft released a free tech preview version on November 9, 2006. In March 2010, Photosynth added support for Gigapixel panoramas stitched in Microsoft ICE.

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