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Conjunto de Habilidades: hacer una Spline de la mariposa (o "Arikata")

Conjunto de Habilidades: hacer una Spline de la mariposa (o "Arikata")
For our Woodworking Skill Set theme, we asked MAKE contributor Len Cullum to contribute some pieces on understanding basic tools and techniques. Here, he presses into service some of the tools covered in previous articles. — Gareth Now that we’ve skimmed the surface of woodworking tools, perhaps we should put some of them to work. Below, we’ll outline the process for making the butterfly spline, known in Japanese as “arikata.” When working with wider, thicker slabs of wood, it is not uncommon to have checking (cracks) in the surface, particularly at the ends. While there are a couple of ways of dealing with this such as filling the gaps with wood or putties or epoxy, I prefer to leave it as it is, treating it as a feature instead of a flaw. What We’ll Be Using: Cracked piece – Port Orford CedarSpline piece – 1″ x 2″ x 3/8″ cherrySharp chisels – 1/2″ and 1″Marking knifeSharp PencilRouter with 1/4″ straight bitAdjustable squareAngle gaugeHammerGlue and brush Start with making the spline.

TetraBox Light by Ed Chew Liquid to Light Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space. Designer: Ed Chew The 360 House in Madrid by Subarquitectura & Yanko Design - StumbleUpon Loopy Home This stunning architectural piece called the 360 House in Madrid, Spain eschews standard conformity by looping in on itself. The roof is at once protective and accessible as a walkway. Designer: Subarquitectura

Fascinating Lamps by Calabarte | Pondly Calabarte is the pseudonym of a Polish artist named Przemek Krawczynski, whose art takes on a peculiar but incredibly beautiful form: cool lamps. The name itself is a portmanteau of two words – art (obviously), and calabash, the fruit that carries his imagination. The calabash is a bottle gourd originating in India, although Calabarte gets his supply from Senegal. Due to ancient domestication and usage, the bottle gourd has an incredibly tough outer shell. In the past, the gourd’s usage was defined mostly as a water container, due to having a tough, smooth shell with an ergonomic shape for handling, and natural buoyancy on water. Due to the combination of dark, thick material with a light source within, the primary art of his work, however, shines in the dark. Hard work, beauty, an exceptional degree of detail and a marriage between mathematical geometry and a rampant imagination – all imprinted onto the husk of a Senegal calabash. Website

Everything you ever wanted to know about anarchism This classic statement of anarchism was written by a diverse group of anarchists in Cardiff around 1980 and it is an interesting historical record of the optimism of mainstream anarchist thought at that time. There is probably more rubbish talked about anarchism than any other political idea. Actually, it has nothing to do with a belief in chaos, death and destruction. Anarchists do not normally carry bombs, nor do they ascribe any virtue to beating up old ladies. It is no accident that the sinister image of the mad anarchist is so accepted. The State, the press and all the assorted authoritarian types, use every means at their disposal to present anarchy as an unthinkable state of carnage and chaos. The alleged necessity of authority is so firmly planted in the average mind that anarchy, which means simply 'no government' is almost unthinkable to most people. Yet there are a limitless range of possible societies without the State. Our rulers claim to be protecting us from each other.

Bates Masi Architects - Portfolio - StumbleUpon Profile Bates Masi + Architects LLC, a full-service architectural firm with roots in New York City and the East End of Long Island for over 50 years, responds to each project with extensive research in related architectural fields, material, craft and environment for unique solutions as varied as the individuals or groups for whom they are designed. The focus is neither the size nor the type of project but the opportunity to enrich lives and enhance the environment. Paul Masi spent childhood summers in Montauk and currently resides in Amagansett. Harry Bates, a resident of East Hampton, received a Bachelor of Architecture from North Carolina State University.

Video Copyright © 2006-2019 The Wood Whisperer Inc. The Wood Whisperer, The Wood Whisperer Guild, TWW, and TWW Guild are trademarks of The Wood Whisperer Inc. All rights reserved. Designed and developed by Underscorefunk Design This site uses affiliate links. Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky Tangga House by Guz Architects | HomeDSGN, a daily source for inspiration and fresh ideas on interior design and home decoration. - StumbleUpon By Eric • Mar 23, 2011 • Selected Work The Tangga House is another Singapore’s dream home designed by Guz Architects. Completed in 2009, the 7,663 square foot residence is located in Holland Village, an elite district of Singapore that is famous amongst the expatriate community. The luxury single-family home gives the owners the opportunity to live in harmony and comfort with nature, in Singapore’s hot tropical climate. Tangga House by Guz Architects: “The house is a contemporary interpretation of a traditional courtyard house, laid out around a central green courtyard with a double height stair and entry area forming the focal point of the project. The L-shaped plan creates open spaces which encourage natural ventilation and offer resident’s views over the courtyard to the veranda, roof gardens and beyond. The large roof above the courtyard creates an indoor and outdoor space leading to the gardens and swimming pool which wraps around two sides of the house. Photos by: Patrick Bingham-Hall

Hand Cut Double Dovetail Experiment - by Woodhacker After admiring the double and double-double dovetail joints that are capable with the Incra and other jigs, I started thinking, “Why not try this by hand?” So this box is my first experiment with handcut double dovetails. It took me some time to figure out the joinery process, but once I realized a few things about this type of joint, it seemed do-able. It was quite challenging but also a ton of fun. It also does take some degree of patience and precision…which I’m still working on. In this blog, I’m focusing on the sides of the box, but here’s a few pictures of the nearly completed box - Materials.For this box’s sides I used three types of primary contrasting woods, although there is no real reason to do so. The picture below shows the rabbet joint cut on each end of each side – I set the rabbet depth at 1/8” and cut it on my router table. Below is a top-view picture of the pieces in relation to each other once they become integral to the box. The close-up below shows in more detail.

Crystal River - The most beautiful river on earth [Pics] Cano Cristales - Crystal River. River of five colors, as the locals call it, originates in the south of the mountain chain Macarena, Colombia, and flows eastward to its confluence with the Guayabero river. In the Cano Cristales found five colors: yellow, blue, green, black and red. All of them are waste product of many algae and, depending on time of year, color saturation, or weakened or strengthened. Share on Tumblr

Gothic Architecture Pictures - stock photos and fine art prints - StumbleUpon All text and pictures © QT Luong. See conditions for use of pictures. There are 28 pictures on this page out of 228 pictures of Gothic Architecture. The DIY $20 brake bleeder The $20 DIY Brake Pressure Bleeder You've heard me extol the songs of brakes and brake fluid, and how its important to change it every two years. I'd like to take credit for this idea, but I got it from this page.: - Here's another one too. And his idea was good. Look, here's the same thing I made for less money.... wow $114.99 LESS!!! You'll need some basic hand tools and a Dremel with a stone cone-shaped bit or a drill and a set of bits. You'll want to use a NEW sprayer tank, don't go grabbing whatever you see in the shed, or was used last summer to kill weeds. This pressure bleeder will (like all of them) will fill your master cylinder up to the very top. last wheel your bleeding, to close the pressure line on the bleeder with the switch on the handle of the tank, and then vent the pressure in the tank. This little ditty will work wonders for your VW's brakes, or hydraulic clutch on your VR6 or Vanagon.. well, just about any European car!

Japón Museo presenta un globo gigante hecha de 10.000 Live-Actualización de los paneles OLED Geo-Cosmos If you want to see what Earth looks like from space, become an astronaut (or, barring that, a space tourist). For the next best view, pay a visit to Tokyo’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation where a massive, nearly 20-foot spherical OLED orb--the world’s first large scale spherical OLED --offers a satellite’s-eye view of the planet in super high resolution. “Geo-Cosmos” is made up of 10,362 OLED panels that display continuously-updating satellite footage of our tiny blue marble, representing what our planet looks like from space in something close to realtime. And like any good museum exhibit, Geo-Cosmos is interactive. [ Tokyo Tek ]

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