background preloader

Characters with Character: Random Personality Generator

If you're enjoying the content here, check out our new site, Thoughtcrime Games. Thanks for visiting! If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! I don’t know about you but when I sit down for a one-shot game with a pregen character, I can’t always come up with a unique and interesting personality on the fly. Sometimes the class, race and skill combo strikes a chord, but usually it’s just numbers. Using the Generator is a snap. Motivation: What is it that really gets your character’s motor running? Instinct: What is your character’s first reaction to a threat (physical or otherwise)? Approach: What archetype is your character best known for being? Now just because every character in D&D is combat-capable does not necessarily make them all warrior-type personalities. Raven, Revenant Tempest FighterMotivation 8 (Intense Experience); Instinct 10 (Invoke Tradition); Approach 12 (Ethereal Mystic) Most living beings fear death. Serious Skills Similar Posts:

http://at-will.omnivangelist.net/2010/11/characters-with-character-random-personality-generator/

Dyson's Random Morph Map Inspired by and using Dyson Logos' Geomorph Maps and coded by Rob Lang of The Free RPG Blog Dyson's Random Morph Map Press F5 for a new map or set tile width of to restrict the width. You can then screenshot or try printing straight from the browser. There are 30 morph types and used in the map. You can increase that if you like.

Random Inn/Tavern Generator Current Settings (Because this is a set of separate images, to save the floorplans you should: press your "print screen" key (or your computer's equivalent) and then open your favorite image editor and paste the screenshot into a new image. Then crop the rest of the screen. Spice Up Your Writing With Dialogue by Judy Cullins Does your chapter sound like a report? Does it go on and on with past tense sentences that tell, rather than show? To spice up your self help, non-fiction or fiction book and even promotional writing, you need to use much more dialogue. Why?

Hex Games As you can see, we've redesigned the Hex web site for the first time in quite a while. With the new version of the site, we've tried to account for the new ways people use gaming websites in the age of social media, which means getting rid of things like the dedicated forums that for the last few years have mainly only served as bait for spammers. We've also done our best to integrate the site with things like Facebook and Twitter. The slider on the right edge of page points to our social media pages (mouse over to see our latest posts) and the one on the left lets you share content on popular sites. You can also comment on most articles using your Facebook account below the article.

[Random Thursday] Strange Stones « Dyson's Dodecahedron Menhir illustration by Philip Reeve Standing stones are an immediate fantasy hook because of most of our obsession over the megaliths such as Stonehenge. Doubly so for those of us who live in parts of the world where such things are not found (like us North Americans). Like this: Seven Keys to Writing Good Dialogue | Nathan Bransford - Blog It goes without saying (but watch me say it) that dialogue is one of the very most crucial elements in a novel. Great dialogue can make a novel sing. Bad dialogue can sink it like a stone. Here are a few ideas on what makes good dialogue work: 1. Good dialogue is not weighed down by exposition

Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab: RPG The RPG Series Illustrations by the inimitable Julie Dillon. “You all meet at an inn.…” Pen and paper role-playing games have been a tremendous influence in my life since my formative years. My parents bought me the magenta D&D boxed set back in 1982, along with the Player’s Handbook, Dungeon Master’s Guide, and Monster Manual. My lifelong passion for fantasy, science fiction, war games, and mythology was well-channeled through RPGs, and I credit playing D&D with helping me sustain my imagination and sense of wonder through adulthood. I played with one particular group through the bulk of my late teens and early 20s, and this series — along with the atmosphere tools that Black Phoenix Trading Post has introduced — was inspired, specifically, by the time that we spent campaigning together.

[Random Thursday] Lost Cities of the Fallen Empire « Dyson's Dodecahedron B4 - The Lost City Lost Cities, Fallen Empires, entire civilizations no longer in decline – but leaving us with nothing but the ruins of their former homes to explore. These are classic themes and settings for pulp adventures and well suited to any role playing game. One of the original D&D modules explores this very theme (B4 – the Lost City). Deck of Many Boons Wouldn’t it be cool if you could get some sort of benefit in-game for doing things that promote better gaming? I do. That’s why I hand-crafted the Deck of Many Boons. It may look like an ordinary deck of cards, but this could not be further from the truth!

[Random Thursday] Party Time! « Dyson's Dodecahedron If there is anything that feels like a classic fantasy story, it is arriving in a town or city just in the midst or verge of a major festival. So what’s the party all about? Table 1 – Random Festivals (d12)

Related: