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Programmation à l'Ecole - Mondes virtuels

Programmation à l'Ecole - Mondes virtuels

http://www.scoop.it/t/programmation-a-l-ecole-primaire

Related:  Ressourcesprogrammation et robotsCoding for KidsRobotique/ProgrammationCode & Bots

Learn Minecraft Hour of Code Grades 2+ | Blocks Moana: Wayfinding with Code Make a Flappy game Blockly for PICAXE - Software Product Details Blockly for PICAXE is a free powerful visual programming tool for generating PICAXE microcontroller programs. By stacking coloured blocks on top of each other a control program can be rapidly generated. Code Maven from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Maven gets teens excited about programming. It is an interactive tutorial where anyone can experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Maven from Crunchzilla uses Javascript.

Code Monster from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Monster gets kids excited about programming. It is a combination of a game and tutorial where kids experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Monster use Javascript. Making Distance Sensors: trigger the Touch Board with proximity Step 8 Spot the difference This code is basically the same as the Touch MP3 code that ships with the Touch Board. The only difference is that the threshold for detecting a touch has been decreased (along with the threshold for detecting a release, for balance). If you have the Touch MP3 code to compare against, you can see that lines 69-78 in Proximity MP3 have been added in, but the rest are the same.

Ideas for Using Minecraft in the Classroom As is the nature of sandbox games, players can roam free, choosing objectives as they go. Because Minecraft has such open possibilities and potential, the teacher can choose how he or she wants to use it. Just as the student has the ability to be creative, the teacher has the same. That can be overwhelming, but luckily, there is a tool for using Minecraft created by teachers for teachers.

Scratch Developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten with the MIT's Media Lab research group, Scratch is a new programming language that facilitates the creation of interactive, cartoons, games, musical compositions of stories, simulations and their shares on the Web. Scratch is a free software designed to introduce students from the age of 8, to fundamental concepts in mathematics and computer science. It is based on a fun of algorithmic approach, to help them to create, to reason and to cooperate. It also promotes the sharing on the Web. From 2007, the website was opened to allow everyone on the one hand to publish, so sharing its projects on the Web, and on the other hand to provide assistance to the implementation of Scratch. I - A.

Computer Coding Game No Computer Needed Superhero Activity A computer coding game is a really fun way to introduce the basic concept of computer coding to young kids. Even better if you make it a superhero computer coding game! Plus you don’t actually have to have a computer, so it’s a cool tech-free idea. This homemade coding game was pretty easy to set up and can be played with over and over again with any type of pieces. Kidsruby.com Write Code You can see your code, run it, and see what it outputs all at the same time. This makes it a lot easier to learn. Try Code Learn to Make Interactive Graphics with Updated Getting Started with Processing We started the Processing project in 2001 as a software sketchbook and to teach computer programming fundamentals within a visual context. Instead of printing “Hello World” to the console, people start by drawing a line to the screen. Since then, Processing has evolved many times over into what it is today — a powerful, minimal environment for learning, sketching, and producing professional work, with a dedicated community of contributors who extend the software with the ever-growing list of libraries (extensions). As always, Processing is free software and can be downloaded from the project website.

15+ great resources for introducing coding to the classroom By Kelly Maher September 4th, 2015 Must-try apps, games, and tutorials for learners of every age “Computer science is a liberal art, it’s something that everyone should be exposed to, everybody should have a mastery of to some extent.”—Steve Jobs As the world continues to become more and more digital, the number of computer science jobs in this country is rising three times faster than the number of computer science graduates.

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. They need this skill not because they’ll all go into it as a career—that isn’t realistic—but because it impacts every career in the 21st-century world.

PLEN2: An Open Source, 3D Printable Robot on Kickstarter The PLEN2 can carry small items, dance around, or play a game of soccer on your desktop and you can make it all happen via a smartphone or PC or a whole range of inputs like motion control, facial expressions, or, for that matter, your brain waves. Yep, the PLEN2 is a robot kit which includes all the control boards, servo motors, and accessories you need to build your own tiny, albeit slight less sophisticated, version of ASIMO, or something very like it. At just 7.87 inches tall and built with some 18 movable joints, the PLEN2 is highly maneuverable and you can — without significant technical knowledge and special tools — build the robot using just a screwdriver. Natsuo Akazawa, the founder and CEO of the PLEN2 Project, says he hopes a Kickstarter campaign for the project will bring robotics technology to the masses. But it all comes down to funding.

Digital Makers Why are we doing this? Digital technologies touch every aspect of life and business – but most people just use them and relatively few create them. We want to mobilise a generation of young people with the drive, confidence and know-how to understand how technology works and make their own new technology – whether websites, apps, hardware, games or innovations we haven’t yet imagined. We believe this won't just benefit young people themselves, but society and the economy too. For more on this, see our Next Gen. report or watch this animation. What have we been doing?

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