background preloader

Using the new Positive Psychology

Using the new Positive Psychology

https://www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu/

Related:  FunPositive PsychologyWebsitesPsychology & NeurocienceBeing Human

The Most Brilliantly Pointless Street Flyers The hand-posted flyer is perhaps the cheapest way to spread the word about lost dogs, found cats, and creepy looking men offering low-cost guitar lessons. But most of the time, those flyers serve as nothing more than reading material for people waiting to get into a bathroom or on a bus. The flyers collected here acknowledge this reality, and they respond by trying to do nothing more than entertain whatever pair of eyes happen to be aimed in their direction.   The Featured Five The Tool for when you need to take action on what you have been avoiding. We avoid doing the things that are most painful for us but the more you act and face the pain, the more options come your way. The Tool for when you are so enraged with a person that the anger traps you in a maze.

DCN Labs Research Interests Prof. Diamond’s lab integrates developmental, cognitive science, neuroscience, and molecular genetic methods to study prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the most complex cognitive abilities ('executive functions' [EFs]) that rely on PFC and interrelated brain regions. Why Raising Children Is So Hard You don't really know what an experience is like, of course, until you have it yourself. I remember thinking to myself when my wife and I first began discussing the idea of having children that this was especially true regarding parenthood . In the past I'd been able to predict with reasonable accuracy a number of novel experiences based on previous similar experiences, but no experience I'd yet had seemed even close to the experience of having a child (sorry, owning a pet doesn't come close). The truth is that parenthood is both wonderful and awful at the same time. What makes it wonderful are all the things people tell you. What makes it awful, however, isn't quite as intuitively clear.

What is Dakini’s Bliss? I was first introduced to the concept of Dakini’s Bliss in an article I read about Pema Chodron. There was an excerpt from Pema’s book “Taking the Leap” where she described a feeling of fear, terror even, and the resulting physical symptoms that accompanied it. She described anxiety, rawness, and a sense of not knowing what comes next, what my teacher Paula likes to call “free fall.” Collection of Photos Taken in the Right Moment August 27, 2010 / Fun / 3 comments This is the biggest collection of photos taken in the right moment. In the last couple of month many different galleries has shown on the web. Here you will find all that photos in one gallery. Enjoy An Interview With Adam Phillips The Stone is a forum for contemporary philosophers and other thinkers on issues both timely and timeless. This video is part of a weekly series of interviews with contemporary thinkers and philosophers on questions that matter. Adam Phillips is a psychotherapist, literary critic and the author several well-known books, including “On Kissing, Tickling and Being Bored,” “Going Sane,” “On Kindness” and most recently, “On Balance.” Though not a professional academic philosopher, we interviewed Phillips because he’s written widely, from a unique psychoanalytic perspective, on a range of themes central to our project.

The Duckworth Lab Our Work Our lab focuses on two traits that predict achievement: grit and self-control. Grit is the tendency to sustain interest in and effort toward very long-term goals (Duckworth et al., 2007). Self-control is the voluntary regulation of behavioral, emotional, and attentional impulses in the presence of momentarily gratifying temptations or diversions (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005; Duckworth & Steinberg, 2015). On average, individuals who are gritty are more self-controlled, but the correlation between these two traits is not perfect: Some individuals are paragons of grit but not self-control, and some exceptionally well-regulated individuals are not especially gritty (Duckworth & Gross, 2014). [ Continue Reading Research Statement ] [ CV ]

Popular psychology theories on self-esteem not backed up by serious research, study finds Low self-esteem is associated with a greater risk of mental health problems such as eating disorders and depression. From a public health perspective, it is important for staff in various health-related professions to know about self-esteem. However, there is a vast difference between the research-based knowledge on self-esteem and the simplified popular psychology theories that are disseminated through books and motivational talks, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg. Current popular psychology books distinguish between self-esteem and self-confidence. It is also believed that it is possible to improve self-esteem without there being a link to how competent people perceive themselves to be in areas they consider important. This is in stark contrast to the results of a new study carried out by researcher Magnus Lindwall from the University of Gothenburg's Department of Psychology and colleagues from the UK, Turkey and Portugal.

Saudade Saudade (European Portuguese: [sɐwˈðaðɨ], Brazilian Portuguese: [sawˈdadi] or [sawˈdadʒi], Galician: [sawˈðaðe]; plural saudades)[1] is a Portuguese and Galician word that has no direct translation in English. It describes a deep emotional state of nostalgic or profound melancholic longing for an absent something or someone that one loves. Moreover, it often carries a repressed knowledge that the object of longing may never return.[2] A stronger form of saudade may be felt towards people and things whose whereabouts are unknown, such as a lost lover, or a family member who has gone missing. Saudade was once described as "the love that remains" after someone is gone. Saudade is the recollection of feelings, experiences, places or events that once brought excitement, pleasure, well-being, which now triggers the senses and makes one live again.

True weird sex stories SS Richard Montgomery Matter Powered by Translate True weird sex stories KARL WATKINS, 20, appeared at Hereford Crown Court in February 1993 on five The Neuroscience of Reframing & How to Do It by Anette Prehn I am a social scientist (M.A.), leadership trainer, thinker, poet, motivational speaker, and professional certified coach (PCC), helping bright, enthusiastic people excel. Having specialised in turning the insights of neuroscience into down-to-earth tools, I help of executives, managers and teams boost their change processes, relational power and results. The author of Play Your Brain (August 2011) and with First Framestorm and Broccoli for Breakfast on their way, my ambition is to reach young and old with powerful and fun brain-based tools. I believe in art and science united. I believe in making difficult things really easy. I believe in the power of the tiny tweaks: boosting strategies and results by changing approaches slightly and brightly.

The Virtues Project "The Virtues Project is a model global program for families of all cultures." United Nations Secretariat, International Year of the Family "The Virtues Project is a bridge between cultures." Robert Greenway, Tahltan elder We always knew that the main purpose of life on this earth was to develop virtues --- to be 'good' people and 'know' ourselves, but it was The Virtues Project that gave us the knowledge and the tools to begin that journey. Our gratitude for the ongoing growth and development of this great Project is boundless.

Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had no longer experienced any additional hallucinations. All were forced to admit to having a mental illness and agree to take antipsychotic drugs as a condition of their release.

This is the homepage of Dr Martin Seligman, who founded positive psychology theory. by mkeen Mar 25

Related:  Positive psychologyPersonality researchpositive psychologyPsychologyTestshemanngosserMindAltitude [Happiness]Medicine, Health, Nutrition & FitnessPositive Psychologyjuliepoopositive pychologyPsychology and Neurologylizal30Psicología Positiva