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Knowmad Society

Knowmad Society

The Future of the Future:From nomads to knowmads:Knowledge cities rise from the desert sands It’s like something out of a Star Wars movie. Flying across the Arabian Desert at night, a glowing city rises along the coast. Its skyline looks like that of any modern city, except for a huge, brightly lit skyscraper that dwarfs everything in sight. Towering almost half a mile high, it is currently the tallest building in the world. Not 50 years ago, the emirate of Dubai was little more than a fishing and pearl diving community along its 72-kilometer coastline, with wandering nomadic tribes in the interior. Clearly, something extraordinary is going on. Moving outward from the world’s tallest skyscraper. you’ll find the world’s largest shopping mall, the world’s largest indoor ski slope, the largest hotel, artificial island and coming soon, the world’s largest LED screen (no kidding). But there’s one more element we knowledge entrepreneurs should find intriguing, and that is the rapid growth of the Knowledge Village (kv.ae). Not all of this is new. The move from tribal to global

Spaceweaver: Nomads Knowmads Noumads The idea for this post came up while reflecting on Wildcat’s latest posts on the Knowmad and from an excellent piece I came by lately in G. Deleuze’s book – Spinoza: Practical Philosophy. To be more precise, it was inspired by a character from a science fiction book I am reading called Galileo’s Dream. Cartophilus never liked maps, but he is certainly the exception rather than the rule because we all love maps, to draw maps and to play with maps. Nomads have very special relations with space. In this light, Wildcat’s knowmad is an experiment in mapping, groping for those complex yet embryonic relations between consciousness and information space that will eventually emerge as a dynamic expression of freedom. While thinking about how nomads and knowmads are related through their style of mapping, that is, their manifest special kind of meeting between space and consciousness, I came across the following paragraph in Deleze’s book: Mind space is a pure relation space.

Nomads, Knowmads, Noumads The idea for this post came up while reflecting on Wildcat’s latest posts on the Knowmad and from an excellent piece I came by lately in G. Deleuze’s book – Spinoza: Practical Philosophy. To be more precise, it was inspired by a character from a science fiction book I am reading called Galileo’s Dream. A decrepit time traveler marooned in Galileo’s time who goes by the name Cartophilus – the lover of maps, brought everything together. Cartophilus never liked maps, but he is certainly the exception rather than the rule because we all love maps, to draw maps and to play with maps. Making maps is an essential aspect of how we extend into spaces. Nomads have very special relations with space. In this light, Wildcat’s knowmad is an experiment in mapping, groping for those complex yet embryonic relations between consciousness and information space that will eventually emerge as a dynamic expression of freedom. Mind space is a pure relation space. -Source Like this: Like Loading...

» Neonomads, or how travels, collaboration, virtualization and motivation are entering a new era « thomas jankowski – gazing at life The term neo-nomad (aka neonomad, digital bedouin) is rather new. In fact, it still lacks a formal definition although the neologism itself is simple enough to understand. A new type of a nomad; a wanderer, someone without a fixed sense of belonging… The way it has been used thus far refers, very generally, to people who take their work with them. In America, this usually applies to the vast amount of web 2.0 startup execs and other self-employed tech workers roaming around in the Bay area. They are sometimes referred to as the Starbucks society, since that is the preferred meeting place of the neo-nomads. Quite aptly so – all major Starbucks locations have excellent wi-fi through a partnership with T-Mobile, and have a corporate feel to them – it is here that one can run into execs from Google, Flickr, or a dozen other hot, new startups. Bill Thompson’s use of the term seems a bit more embracing of the neo-nomad mentality. But that, too, is changing.

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