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Generating Positive Emotions

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The Science of Gratitude - Issue 30: Identity. I conducted an early Thanksgiving experiment on myself.

The Science of Gratitude - Issue 30: Identity

I was in Reykjavik, Iceland, on a lecture trip. My morning was free, and I took it to write two pages about how lucky I am—something, I’m embarrassed to say, that I had never done before. Here is one thing I wrote: “I’m looking out at a sky that Vikings would have seen. I get to do this—me.” Writing it all down felt very good. 10 Ways Gratitude Can Change Your Life & 4 Step Gratitude Plan.

Gratitude can motivate others, increase self-control, build social ties and more…plus 4-step gratitude plan.

10 Ways Gratitude Can Change Your Life & 4 Step Gratitude Plan

Gratitude is the new miracle emotion. Although gratitude has been around for as long as human beings, it’s only recently started to get the big thumbs-up from science. Use This Simple Daily Habit to Add More Gratitude to Your Life. I have a simple gratitude habit that I have been following nearly every day for three years.

Use This Simple Daily Habit to Add More Gratitude to Your Life

I want to share it with you here. First, let me set the stage. The Minor Tragedy The other day I ordered takeout from one of my favorite Indian restaurants for dinner. My family had a tight timeline that night, which meant we would only be together for an hour before everyone had to run off in separate directions. We picked up the food and drove home, but when we opened the bag we realized that the restaurant had forgotten to include one of the main dishes from our order. In the grand scheme of things, this isn’t a big deal. I wasn’t going anywhere later that night, so I volunteered to drive back to the restuarant and pick up the missing food while everyone else packed their bags for their trip.

The How of Happiness. Hardwiring Happiness. Rick Hanson is a master of his craft, showing us a wise path for daily living in this book.

Hardwiring Happiness

Based in the latest findings of neuroscience, this book reveals that if we understand the brain a little, we can take care of our lives a lot, and make a real difference to our well-being. Here is a book to savor, to practice, and to take to heart. –Mark Williams, Ph.D., Professor, University of Oxford, author of Mindfulness The cultivation of happiness is one of the most important skills anyone can ever learn.

Luckily, it’s not hard when we know the way to water and nourish these wholesome seeds, which are already there in our consciousness. In this remarkable book, one of the world’s leading authorities on mind training shows how to cultivate the helpful and good within us. Dan Gilbert: The surprising science of happiness. Authentic Happiness. Martin Seligman 'Flourishing - a new understanding of wellbeing' at Happiness & Its Causes 2012.

Wisebrain.org. The Foundations of Well-Being. Dr. Rick Hanson - Discover the Simple Method to More Joy &Less Stress. Posted on: February 1st, 2013 Wishing well?

Dr. Rick Hanson - Discover the Simple Method to More Joy &Less Stress

The Practice: Bless. Why? Lately, I’ve been wondering what would be on my personal list of top five practices (all tied for first place). You might ask yourself the same question, knowing that you can cluster related practices under a single umbrella, your list may differ from mine, and your practices may change over time. In these JOTs, so far I’ve written about two of my top practices: Meditate – Mindfulness, training attention, contemplation, concentration, absorption, non-ordinary consciousness, liberating insightTake in the good (in three chapters excerpted from my book, Just One Thing) – Recognize the brain’s negativity bias (Velcro for the bad, Teflon for the good), see good facts in the world and in yourself, be intimate with your experience, have and enrich and absorb positive experiences (turning mental states into neural traits, good moments into a great brain), let positive soothe and replace negative How?

Do blessing deliberately. Dr. Rick Hanson - Author of Buddha's Brain and Just One Thing. Posted on: November 30th, 2012 Who do you argue with?

Dr. Rick Hanson - Author of Buddha's Brain and Just One Thing

The Practice:Don’t quarrel.Why? It’s one thing to stick up for yourself and others. But it’s a different matter to get caught up in wrangles, contentiousness, squabbles . . . in a word: quarrels. Similarly, it’s one thing to disagree with someone, even to the point of arguing – but it’s a different matter to get so caught up in your position that you lose sight of the bigger picture, including your relationship with the other person.

You know you’re quarreling when you find yourself getting irritated, especially with that sticky feeling that you’re just not gonna quit until you’ve won. Quarrels happen both out in the open, between people, and inside the mind, like when you make a case in your head about another person or keep revisiting an argument to make your point more forcefully. Plus it eats away like acid on a relationship. This week, try not to quarrel with anyone or anything. Rick Hanson. YouTube. Matthieu Ricard: Habits of happiness.