background preloader

Gastronomer's Guide: Simple Tiramisu

Gastronomer's Guide: Simple Tiramisu
For a lazy summer afternoon, tiramisu is the perfect pick-me-up. Its literal translation is pick me up (tira mi su). Tiramisu is one of those desserts that has as many different versions as there are mothers in Italy. This is my simple yet traditional version of the easy to assemble, no-bake, no-cook dessert. Mascarpone can be found in Italian specialty stores usually in an 8-ounce or 17-ounce container. Note: Leave out the raw eggs if you are uncomfortable using them or use pasteurized eggs. 4 large eggs, separated1 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar16 ounces mascarpone cheese1-1/2 cups brewed coffee1/2 cup coffee liqueur40 store-bought ladyfingers1 cup heavy creamcocoa powderbittersweet chocolate In a large bowl, beat egg yolks and cup of sugar until light and fluffy. In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg whites until soft peaks form. In a small bowl combine coffee and coffee liqueur. Dust with cocoa powder and garnish with grated and/or shaved bittersweet chocolate. Related:  Cake and cupcakes

Big Red Kitchen: Little Peach Cakes More Food Crafts:Chocolate Covered Strawberry Mallow CandiesRainbow Cupcakes with Rainbow FrostingCandy Cake The title of this post sounds like a term of endearment someone may bestow on a cute little child, but no, the photo is a shot of my Little Peach Cakes made this morning for when my niece and nephew come over to play. My own children were amazed at how real these little cakes appeared. They were almost too cute to cut into and eat but everyone loves a fresh peach right? I had spotted these in a magazine years and years ago (maybe Southern Living?) and just today thought to make them. A piece of cinnamon stick and a peppermint leaf complete the finishing touches. Little Peach Cakes What you will need: 2 Wilton Mini Ball Pans1/2 Duncan Hines Yellow cake mix, 1/4 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1/3 cup milkred liquid food coloringyellow liquid food coloring3/4 cup granulated sugar, divided1 cinnamon stick6-12 fresh peppermint leaves12 whole almondsOne batch Buttercream Frosting 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

2 Stews: Cheesecake In A Mug I was telling a friend about my 1-2-3 Chocolate Microwave Mug Cake and kept thinking there had to be equally easy and delicious alternatives. I had some cream cheese and sour cream in the refrigerator and played around with a microwave cheesecake. The first time I overcooked it, but the second time was a charm. This cake is great for people at work, in dorms or if you just want cheesecake...fast! Instead of a crust, I added a crumb topping. Microwave Mug Cheesecake 2 ounces low fat cream cheese, softened to room temperature1/2 cup low fat sour cream1/4 teaspoon vanilla2 tablespoons sugar2 tablespoons egg white, slightly beaten (egg whites in a carton work fine)1/2 teaspoon lemon juice1/2 teaspoon cornstarch (prevents liquid from forming) For "mix ins", add 1 tablespoon mini chocolate chips, or swirl in (not stir) 1 tablespoon jam of choice. In a 1 cup or larger microwave proof mug, beat the cream cheese until light and fluffy with a small whisk. or swirl in jam at this time. Serves 1.

Ivory's Ivory Rebatch | Little House in the Suburbs Thank you for visiting Little House in the Suburbs. Please subscribe and you'll get great simple living tips and how-to articles delivered to your inbox, for free! Last week, TL acquainted you with the perils of remilling homemade soap. In that article, she mentions that ‘tallow’ soap is easier to rebatch. Well guess what’s the first ingredient in Ivory Soap? Sodium Tallowate. So, this is for all ya’ll who thought my soap wrapping post betrayed a secret knowledge of store-bought rebatching. Ivory’s Remilled Ivory Ivory soap Water Additives (~1 tsp oil/8 oz soap) Microwave 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. BTW, that’s lavender bits on the right. Tagged as: chemical-free, frugal living, green living, homemade body products, natural body care

Twice Baked Potatoes Hiiii Abby!!! This blog post is dedicated to Abby. Abby emailed me a few weeks ago requesting a recipe that could be made in the microwave. No biggie, Abby; I got you, gurrrrl! Meet the Twice Baked Potatoes. I made ‘em two ways: decadent and amazing (bacon, cheddar, jalapenos, sour cream) and healthy and good (yogurt, chives, zucchini). I’m not even gonna pretend the healthy way tastes better. You’re gonna start by forking the potatoes. Now, pretend you’re in a video game. If you’re going right (oven), then put them on a baking sheet, season them with salt, pepper and olive oil and bake. If you’re going left (microwave), you’re going to place them on a microwave safe plate, season them with salt, pepper and olive oil and nuke. (Directions for both are below!) This is what potatoes look like when they come out of the oven/microwave. Thrilling picture, isn’t it? HOLD ON TO YOUR BUTTS, everyone….because it’s about to get all cheesy/yogurty/exciting up in this place. Add the yogurt and mash. P.S.

Samoas ~ The Girl Scout Cookie Clone For a PRINTABLE copy of the recipe, you'll find it on my recipe blog. Click below:Once Upon a Plate RecipesIf you like the Girl Scout Cookies Samoas (also known as Caramel De-lites), I'm quite certain you will like these! I found the recipe on the excellent website "Baking Bites", and posted by a wonderful baker named Nicole. Thank you Nicole, for cracking the code for these delicious cookies. And please don't overlook all of Nicole's OTHER recipes on her incredible website ~ her talent is amazing: Please NOTE: I don't want you to be disappointed.---> If you are of the 'slice and bake' cookie mind, making these cookies might not be for you. <--- These cookies DO take TIME, EFFORT and a bit of SKILL. (also known as Caramel de-Lites) Makes about 3 1/2 to 4 dozen 1 cup butter, softened 1/2 cup sugar 2 cups all purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract up to 2 tablespoons milk Preheat oven to 350F. Cream together butter and sugar in a large bowl. Topping:

makes » recipe: ice cream cake (but not like you think) If you’ve been following along, you’re probably aware that I collect cookbooks. Specifically, cookbooks created by New England civic organizations between 1950 and 1980 for fundraising purposes. With yard sale season in full swing, I find myself solvent with new recipe ideas, among them one I found in this vandalized and water-damaged collection. The picture on the cover somewhat suggests the architecture of Calvary Baptist Church in Easthampton, but I bought the book in Millbury and it has no date (I’ve never been to that Church, I just tried to do some due diligence in my googling). And hey, no cake flour or fancy measuring required, because we’re using cake mix. I let my ice cream soften by scooping it up into small chunks and letting it sit a few minutes. The recipe calls for greasing & flouring a tube pan. After 4 minutes of beating, the batter kinda just looks like . . . well, melted ice cream. She was right. Preheat oven to 350o.

Flourless Chocolate Cake Flourless Chocolate Heaven- Perfection for a Gluten-Free Diet This is my go-to dessert whenever I'm having guests. Everyone loves it. And the best part is- the recipe is inherently gluten-free. No substitutions. Karina's Flourless Chocolate Cake Recipe Originally published January 2007. Dense, sexy chocolate deliciousness on a plate. Ingredients: 16 oz. solid dark chocolate (use your favorite GF dark chocolate bars) 1 cup organic light brown sugar, packed 1/2 cup organic white cane sugar 3/4 cup very hot strong coffee (or use espresso powder in very hot water) 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into pieces 2 tablespoons unsweetened organic cocoa powder 8 large organic free-range eggs, at room temperature 1 tablespoon bourbon vanilla extract- yes, a tablespoon! Instructions: Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Break up the dark chocolate into pieces and pour the chocolate into the bowl of the food processor. Pour the hot water or coffee slowly into the feed tube as you pulse again.

» USPS Mail Shipping Classes Explained Email Over the course of the last few weeks, I’ve been mailing a bunch of documents and packages back and forth between my parents and myself. Some of these packages have been important from a sentimental perspective, some have been important from a financial perspective, and some were just some routine things that weren’t important at all. Certified Mail The package is trackable and a signature is required on delivery. Registered Mail Registered mail is the only one that guarantees delivery and they claim to put it under “tight security from the point of mailing to the point of delivery,” plus insurance of up to $25k against loss and damage. Express Mail The package is trackable (if you print the label online) though no signature is required on delivery. Priority Mail The package is trackable (if you print the label online) though no signature is required on delivery. First Class Mail This is essentially everything else and is what I call regular mail. Confusion… Related Posts

Garlic Knots When I was in High School, I thought garlic knots were the best things on earth. I guess I still kind of think that, but often I’m disappointed by the garlic knots I buy. I’m not sure if the quality of garlic knots has gone down in NYC or if I’ve become harder to please. These days, they are often hard and dry, probably from being left around too long. As with all bread-based goodies, the freshest way to get it is out of your own oven. These really are a reasonable amount of work, and easily doubled, tripled, or quadrupled for even more return. I’m assuming that pizzerias make their garlic knots with the same dough that they make pizza with, so use any pizza dough that you like. Garlic Knots~12-13 knots 3/4 cup +1 tablespoon all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon sugar1/2 teaspoon instant yeast1/2 teaspoon table salt1/3 cup water at room temperature (70 to 90 degrees)5 1/2 teaspoon olive oil, divided4 large cloves garlic, minced1/4 teaspoon kosher salt1 packed tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 1.

My FAVORITE Chocolate Chip Cookie I have experimented with countless recipes searching for that perfect chocolate chip cookie. The characteristics of the perfect cookie are a very personal matter, and here are my preferences: texture: chewy w. medium thickness --- everyone has their preference, and this is mine! chocolate to cookie ratio: 50/50 --- I really enjoy having a lot of chocolate in every bite chips vs. chunks: chunks --- I like sizeable pieces of chocolate in my cookie. type of chocolate: bittersweet --- I like using Valrhona 61% extra bitter nuts or other add-ins: NONE!! With the above criteria in mind, this recipe is the closest I've come to experiencing CCC perfection. - Don't substitute the pastry and bread flours w. - Hand chopped chocolate chunks, NOT premade chips - I will purchase a hunk of the best bittersweet chocolate that I can afford and hand cut them into chunks. - Chill the cookie dough at least 24 hours (I let my dough sit anywhere from 2-3 days) before baking.

Root Beer Float Cake Before I made this cake on Sunday afternoon, I sat down with a nice, tall root beer float. Sure, it was 10:30 in the morning. I suppose that technically that means I had a root beer float for breakfast. That’s one of the great thing about being an adult, you can have a float for breakfast with no resistance. Something about a root beet float puts me on a conveyor belt back to some really random childhood memories. But cake!? Answers and cake, just a click away. Here’s what you should know about the Root Beer Float Cake. The cake doesn’t have the same memory inducing effects as a real root beer float. Try this cake. Root Beer Float Cake Baked: New Frontiers in Baking Print this Recipe! 2 cups root beer (don’t use diet) 1 cup dark unsweetened cocoa powder 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cut into 1/2 inch cubes 1 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 2 large eggs Preheat even to 325 degrees F. Chocolate Root Beer Frosting

Related: